DTC is Off or minimized. (Warning!) Correcting for rear wheel slide. - Ducati Supersport 939 Forum
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post #1 of 13 (permalink) Old 07-10-2019, 08:52 AM Thread Starter
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DTC is Off or minimized. (Warning!) Correcting for rear wheel slide.

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post #2 of 13 (permalink) Old 07-10-2019, 11:35 AM
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There's a reason all the pros ride dirt-track or just plain dirt for training - maintaining brake, throttle and slide control.

I learned to ride in the dirt last year, after 25 years of riding on the street. My street riding improved remarkably afterward. I think I took to the dirt really quickly due to many track days in the Miata and learning how to initiate and control four wheel drifts with a 2200 lb car that has less HP than a Supersport.

Tracking the Miata is also where I learned my two axioms: "Slow is smooth and smooth is fast," and "if you want to go faster, stop using the brakes - they only slow you down."
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post #3 of 13 (permalink) Old 07-10-2019, 11:44 AM
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Originally Posted by psyopper View Post
There's a reason all the pros ride dirt-track or just plain dirt for training - maintaining brake, throttle and slide control.

I learned to ride in the dirt last year, after 25 years of riding on the street. My street riding improved remarkably afterward. I think I took to the dirt really quickly due to many track days in the Miata and learning how to initiate and control four wheel drifts with a 2200 lb car that has less HP than a Supersport.

Tracking the Miata is also where I learned my two axioms: "Slow is smooth and smooth is fast," and "if you want to go faster, stop using the brakes - they only slow you down."
Agree with the first axiom but the second one contradicts trail braking
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post #4 of 13 (permalink) Old 07-10-2019, 11:57 AM
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Fastest guys use their brakes the most. At least in a high power to weight vehicle. On a bicycle, probably not.
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post #5 of 13 (permalink) Old 07-10-2019, 12:42 PM
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Fastest guys use their brakes the most. At least in a high power to weight vehicle. On a bicycle, probably not.
A bicycle is an apt comparison when considering a Miata with 85 HP trying to climb up the hill coming out of turn 5 at Laguna Seca. The only way to do it is to hit the turn flat out, let the corner scrub the speed, and shove your foot through the floorboard all the way up through 6 and 7. Anything less will see you getting to the top at about 20 mph in 1st gear begging to maintain any amount of momentum.
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post #6 of 13 (permalink) Old 07-10-2019, 01:56 PM
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Love Mazda road cars. Great handling and feel. Rarely able to outrun their chassis. Hence not using much brakes. On a bike, even one with our relatively low power to weight, it's a different story.

When I started riding 110 HP was unheard of. Few cars made that king of power. I always considered that no one needed more than 80 HP on the road. Still true for me. On the road, I can keep up with anyone I want to without using more than 6k rpm.
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post #7 of 13 (permalink) Old 07-10-2019, 02:29 PM Thread Starter
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There's a reason all the pros ride dirt-track or just plain dirt for training - maintaining brake, throttle and slide control.
Yes.

Im not a racer, but it was a fortunate coincidence for me, more than planned, to start in the dirt as I wasnt of legal age for the street when starting riding.
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post #8 of 13 (permalink) Old 07-10-2019, 06:56 PM
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There's using brakes and USING BRAKES.
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post #9 of 13 (permalink) Old 07-10-2019, 09:08 PM
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Started in dirt at young age. I too believe it helped to understand handling.
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post #10 of 13 (permalink) Old 07-11-2019, 01:13 PM
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I have started riding flat track and am "painfully" understanding the balance of the bike, or my "movable balance point on the front vs rear". Flat tracking on short tracks, when going into the corner your backing it in and if/when the front washes out, you either low side or slide in perfect balance until you find grip again. As I get better with my sliding, I am moving more weight distribution to the front wheel. When going into a corner, if the bike is rear wheel heavy in weight distribution the rear steps out violently and low sides happen. Just got my SSS last month and thinking a lot about this fore and aft weight distribution when I am in the canyons. Really not a believer in sliding a street bike or even when riding supermoto at the track, because smooth control just seem like the way to survive. Just leaning forward when the rear steps out is usually enough to calm the bike down, I have found. I have no idea how the Ducati traction control works. This is a wonderful forum and thank you to all who share
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