Ducati Supersport 939 Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Administrator
Joined
·
293 Posts
Discussion Starter #1


Ducati introduced a new 937cc SuperSport, adding a new street-based sportbike to its roster to go alongside the more track-focused Panigale line. The SuperSport will be available in a base model for $12,995 and a higher-end S model for $14,795 which adds upgraded suspension and quickshifter. Ducati will also offer a choice of Sport or Touring packages.

2017 Ducati Supersport S Leaked

The SS is powered by Ducati’s 937cc Testastretta 11° engine claiming with 111 hp at 9000 rpm and 71.3 lb-ft. at 6500 rpm. According to Ducati, the engine reaches 80% of its maximum torque at just 3000 rpm, while still staying above 90% when it reaches its peak revs. The ECU allows for three selectable ride modes to suit varying conditions: Sport, Touring and Urban. Exhaust gases flow through a 2-1-2 system to a stacked silencer setup behind the right footpeg.

Read More Here
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
Reviews won't be the deciding factor when it comes to purchasing a new motorcycle, it's the test ride that'll do it but reviews will keep us entertained while the 939 gets shipped to your dealership.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,531 Posts
Steeve, we all want to see MCN's opinions on the new SS, but we also know, given the carryover hardware on this bike, pretty much what it will be like to ride. Once I saw the look and accompanying specs I was sold. With all due respect, I'm not waiting for Mr. Neeves review to make my purchase decision.
Sorry I wasn't suggesting that what we read in any magazine would significantly affect the buying decision. All I was posting was a link to the MCN article announcing their press launch, as you should be able to clearly see. I'm unsure where you got that feeling from?

I just thought people would be interested that there is some 'new' news, good or bad, as it's all gone very quiet.

Personally I'm looking forward to reading their review, but sadly most testers are racers and or younger people who don't have trouble bending knees or being hunched up over a sports bike.
Like previous new bikes I've bought, I'll get hold of as many test reports as I can find and keep them. I find them interesting although not always relevant.

MCN or at least Andy Downes (senior reporter) has already pinned his opinions to the mast. He thinks the bike is an irrelevance and suggests if we want a 'sportsbike' we buy a Panigale and if we want to ride fast on the road or tour we buy a Multistarda. Wait until he's older he may change his opinions.

See a copy of his report below. Please note I do not support his views. To me the new Supersport is very much along the lines of the first VFR 750, a complete do it all bike.


AGAINST: MCN Senior Reporter Andy Downes:
"This is the first new Ducati I’ve looked at in recent years and thought ‘Huh? I don’t get it.’
"I do get the concept of a sportsbike for the road but I think the Ducati Multistrada 1200 range ticks that box. That is a bike that packs a superbike punch but keeps it comfy, keeps it practical but also adds a pillion-friendly riding capability. The Multistrada range is aimed directly at the blokes who used to ride superbikes but have got a bit older, a bit less willing to accept the comfort compromises, yet still want to keep on riding.
"And if you still really, really still want a sportsbike then there is a wide array of the nutty Panigales to choose from that includes the 959 through to the Panigale R. I’m not sure where that leaves a bike like the SuperSport 939 which doesn’t cover either base in a way that’s immediately obvious to me.
"I’ve talked to lots of Ducati owners about the return of a SuperSport badge on a modern Ducati and the bike they have told me they would be more interested in seeing was something that was a bit more of a modern retro-styled bike with about 120bhp, simple technology and minimal rider aids. Something that could take on the new Triumph Thurston R for example. This kind of Panigale ‘lite’ is not what they had in mind. And even at around £10,000 for the standard bike it feels a little pricey.
"Maybe I’m looking at this from the wrong end of the argument? Maybe offering an alternative to 195bhp, focussed and looney-tunes superbikes is the way sportsbikes can offer more to a greater number of people? Maybe this is a more authentic take on a modern SuperSport bike that harks back to the old SS models that ran alongside the 851/888 superbikes of the time rather than some retro bike offering?"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
524 Posts
Sorry I wasn't suggesting that what we read in any magazine would significantly affect the buying decision. All I was posting was a link to the MCN article announcing their press launch, as you should be able to clearly see. I'm unsure where you got that feeling from?

I just thought people would be interested that there is some 'new' news, good or bad, as it's all gone very quiet.

Personally I'm looking forward to reading their review, but sadly most testers are racers and or younger people who don't have trouble bending knees or being hunched up over a sports bike.
Like previous new bikes I've bought, I'll get hold of as many test reports as I can find and keep them. I find them interesting although not always relevant.

MCN or at least Andy Downes (senior reporter) has already pinned his opinions to the mast. He thinks the bike is an irrelevance and suggests if we want a 'sportsbike' we buy a Panigale and if we want to ride fast on the road or tour we buy a Multistarda. Wait until he's older he may change his opinions.

See a copy of his report below. Please note I do not support his views. To me the new Supersport is very much along the lines of the first VFR 750, a complete do it all bike.


AGAINST: MCN Senior Reporter Andy Downes:
"This is the first new Ducati I’ve looked at in recent years and thought ‘Huh? I don’t get it.’
"I do get the concept of a sportsbike for the road but I think the Ducati Multistrada 1200 range ticks that box. That is a bike that packs a superbike punch but keeps it comfy, keeps it practical but also adds a pillion-friendly riding capability. The Multistrada range is aimed directly at the blokes who used to ride superbikes but have got a bit older, a bit less willing to accept the comfort compromises, yet still want to keep on riding.
"And if you still really, really still want a sportsbike then there is a wide array of the nutty Panigales to choose from that includes the 959 through to the Panigale R. I’m not sure where that leaves a bike like the SuperSport 939 which doesn’t cover either base in a way that’s immediately obvious to me.
"I’ve talked to lots of Ducati owners about the return of a SuperSport badge on a modern Ducati and the bike they have told me they would be more interested in seeing was something that was a bit more of a modern retro-styled bike with about 120bhp, simple technology and minimal rider aids. Something that could take on the new Triumph Thurston R for example. This kind of Panigale ‘lite’ is not what they had in mind. And even at around £10,000 for the standard bike it feels a little pricey.
"Maybe I’m looking at this from the wrong end of the argument? Maybe offering an alternative to 195bhp, focussed and looney-tunes superbikes is the way sportsbikes can offer more to a greater number of people? Maybe this is a more authentic take on a modern SuperSport bike that harks back to the old SS models that ran alongside the 851/888 superbikes of the time rather than some retro bike offering?"
Steeve, I'm with you on this. I'm looking forward to what the journalists have to say, but I've made my own decision already based on all the years experience I have. I'd like a bike similar to the VFR or older SS, but updated in looks and technology. Andy doesn't get it and that's OK, but I do. For me, the Panigales are way too race track focused for the street riding I do and the Multistradas are too tall and too ugly to find a place in my garage (and I've ridden both). Yes, some would like the new SS to be a retro bike and Ducati has done that before, but I think this new SS will hit a sweet spot for many riders, especially now that the demographics are changing (we Boomers are getting old!).
I sure loved my '99 SS; enough that I kept it for 15 years (see photo).
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
430 Posts
Sorry I wasn't suggesting that what we read in any magazine would significantly affect the buying decision. All I was posting was a link to the MCN article announcing their press launch, as you should be able to clearly see. I'm unsure where you got that feeling from?

I just thought people would be interested that there is some 'new' news, good or bad, as it's all gone very quiet.

Personally I'm looking forward to reading their review, but sadly most testers are racers and or younger people who don't have trouble bending knees or being hunched up over a sports bike.
Like previous new bikes I've bought, I'll get hold of as many test reports as I can find and keep them. I find them interesting although not always relevant.

MCN or at least Andy Downes (senior reporter) has already pinned his opinions to the mast. He thinks the bike is an irrelevance and suggests if we want a 'sportsbike' we buy a Panigale and if we want to ride fast on the road or tour we buy a Multistarda. Wait until he's older he may change his opinions.

See a copy of his report below. Please note I do not support his views. To me the new Supersport is very much along the lines of the first VFR 750, a complete do it all bike.


AGAINST: MCN Senior Reporter Andy Downes:
"This is the first new Ducati I’ve looked at in recent years and thought ‘Huh? I don’t get it.’
"I do get the concept of a sportsbike for the road but I think the Ducati Multistrada 1200 range ticks that box. That is a bike that packs a superbike punch but keeps it comfy, keeps it practical but also adds a pillion-friendly riding capability. The Multistrada range is aimed directly at the blokes who used to ride superbikes but have got a bit older, a bit less willing to accept the comfort compromises, yet still want to keep on riding.
"And if you still really, really still want a sportsbike then there is a wide array of the nutty Panigales to choose from that includes the 959 through to the Panigale R. I’m not sure where that leaves a bike like the SuperSport 939 which doesn’t cover either base in a way that’s immediately obvious to me.
"I’ve talked to lots of Ducati owners about the return of a SuperSport badge on a modern Ducati and the bike they have told me they would be more interested in seeing was something that was a bit more of a modern retro-styled bike with about 120bhp, simple technology and minimal rider aids. Something that could take on the new Triumph Thurston R for example. This kind of Panigale ‘lite’ is not what they had in mind. And even at around £10,000 for the standard bike it feels a little pricey.
"Maybe I’m looking at this from the wrong end of the argument? Maybe offering an alternative to 195bhp, focussed and looney-tunes superbikes is the way sportsbikes can offer more to a greater number of people? Maybe this is a more authentic take on a modern SuperSport bike that harks back to the old SS models that ran alongside the 851/888 superbikes of the time rather than some retro bike offering?"
That opinion of Andy Downers above was penned in July 2016. He hadn't even seen or ridden the bike. So its really just his opinion about the SPORT-touring market segment, e.g everyone in that segment should ride some butt ugly bloated adventure bike. Compare his comment to that of Martin Rees in the same article: “I believe there’s a real gap in the market for it at the moment. It’ll be nice to have a great handling bike that is comfortable to ride and isn’t going to rip your arms off. Hopefully it’ll come in at the right price point too. I think I know who has a more realistic assessment of the market place.

Andy Downers (unfortunate surname) is totally looking at it from the wrong end of the argument. Taking notice of people who want a retro copy of a 1970's Duc along the lines of the Thurxton S. These people may say this is what they want (you'll read exactly the same thing in Kawasaki forums about another Z1 retro), but when it comes time for putting their money on the table, they'll be nowhere to be seen. I like retro's, have one already, but no way would I part with $20k to buy a naked bike with a 25 degree forward lean angle like the Thurxton. Yes its a nice looking bike, good for a short ride to the local coffee shop (well not even that good compared to a 250 dual-sport).

According to Andy, the Ninja 1000 is pretty pointless, same as the BMW RS, etc. I doubt I'll be taking much notice of anything Andy writes about the bike.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
728 Posts
Steeve, I'm with you on this. I'm looking forward to what the journalists have to say, but I've made my own decision already based on all the years experience I have. I'd like a bike similar to the VFR or older SS, but updated in looks and technology. Andy doesn't get it and that's OK, but I do. For me, the Panigales are way too race track focused for the street riding I do and the Multistradas are too tall and too ugly to find a place in my garage (and I've ridden both). Yes, some would like the new SS to be a retro bike and Ducati has done that before, but I think this new SS will hit a sweet spot for many riders, especially now that the demographics are changing (we Boomers are getting old!).
I sure loved my '99 SS; enough that I kept it for 15 years (see photo).
I couldnt agree more with you!!! I was originally waiting for the new Honda Interceptor, but it never came. Once this was announced I was sold!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
137 Posts
Someone I knew that was a said hardcore Honda and Ducati fan boy just ditched those two all together and went to Kawaski for the Ninja H2 - an amazing pick, but I haven't seen it being a bike that many Ducati owners accepted the idea of having especailly for the price they go for.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
728 Posts
Someone I knew that was a said hardcore Honda and Ducati fan boy just ditched those two all together and went to Kawaski for the Ninja H2 - an amazing pick, but I haven't seen it being a bike that many Ducati owners accepted the idea of having especailly for the price they go for.
I have never been a Kawi guy. All of my bikes, street and dirt , have been Suzuki, Yamaha or Honda. I have to say that the H2 is a very , very nice bike but at almost 2x what the SS it will be a tough sell. Based on the performance numbers the H2 is more than what the typical SS or VFR buyer is looking for ...from a HP perspective.

I think we will see many people like me....50ish, lifelong rider that doesnt want the power or the ergos of a Panigale, but still enjoys leaning it over in the twisties and now that the kids are out, or almost out of college, have the funds to buy something that looks good but you can ride it all day.

I dont see many 25 year olds buying this...there are too many other options for them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,531 Posts
H2 is not a Supersport competitor. Too expensive, too limited, uncomfortable and hugely more powerful. A frightening ride that is too intimidating on the road.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
As nice as the Ninja H2 is, the supercharged supersport is too much of a beast for me to handle and I think it's still holding the title of being the most powerful production motorcycle on the market. That's a far cry from the Supersport.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top