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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Any one taken off their OEM wheels and weighed them yet. They look the same as the Monster S wheels, I assume they *are* the same because that's how Ducati rolls.

I'm wondering what the wheel upgrades are going to look like. Forged Aluminum will be the least expensive but I wonder how much weight we'll actually save.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Anyone work out wheel genealogy yet?

There's a lovely pair of forged silver 1098S wheels that I'm pretty certain are drop in replacements that I have my eyes on.

The 1098 and MTS 1200 are wheel compatable, and the MTS and Monster 1200 are wheel compatable, and the Monster 1200 and the Supersport are wheel compatable - as far as I can tell.
 

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Maybe the front wheel is the same but the rear is different.
SuperSport is 5,50" x 17, Monster is 6,00" x 17
 

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New wheels? I really like the factory ones. Usually (on Asian bikes), the wheels are boring, but I like these. :nerd:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
New wheels? I really like the factory ones. Usually (on Asian bikes), the wheels are boring, but I like these. :nerd:
I'm not sure of your background, so I don't want to be insulting - have you ridden a bike that has the wheels upgraded to something lighter and/or more mass centralized? The difference in handling is usually described as "amazing" and "the best performance upgrade I made, regardless of price."

Because of the reduced gyroscopic effect, the lighter front weight allows much easier side/side transitions preventing rider fatigue, or conversely - with the same rider input, much faster transitions. The lighter rear wheel increases acceleration numbers significantly - on my 94 900SS (which had boat anchors for wheels) it was about the equivalent of 3 or more teeth on the rear sprocket, allowing me to adjust final gearing to regain some top end speed without losing acceleration performance elsewhere. On both ends, the lighter weight needs less suspension compression/rebound leading to a much nicer and more compliant ride.

New high end forged aluminum wheels will run in the range of $3000 USD. It's not uncommon to find used OEM forged aluminum wheels (maybe slightly heavier than the top end race wheels, but still saving you several pounds of rotating mass over the low grade wheels on our bikes) in the $900 to $1200 range. The real treat, if you have the ways and means, is a pair of BST Carbon Fiber wheels, almost never sold used and going for around $4000 new.

On my '94 900SS I found a pair of Marchesini Kompe forged aluminum wheels for sale used off of a track bike being parted out. I have the numbers somewhere, but I think it came out to removing 6 lbs off the front wheel and almost 10 lbs off the rear. I got even luckier that they were anodized gold and kept the same basic color aesthetic on the bike.
 

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I'm not sure of your background, so I don't want to be insulting - have you ridden a bike that has the wheels upgraded to something lighter and/or more mass centralized? The difference in handling is usually described as "amazing" and "the best performance upgrade I made, regardless of price."

Because of the reduced gyroscopic effect, the lighter front weight allows much easier side/side transitions preventing rider fatigue, or conversely - with the same rider input, much faster transitions. The lighter rear wheel increases acceleration numbers significantly - on my 94 900SS (which had boat anchors for wheels) it was about the equivalent of 3 or more teeth on the rear sprocket, allowing me to adjust final gearing to regain some top end speed without losing acceleration performance elsewhere. On both ends, the lighter weight needs less suspension compression/rebound leading to a much nicer and more compliant ride.

New high end forged aluminum wheels will run in the range of $3000 USD. It's not uncommon to find used OEM forged aluminum wheels (maybe slightly heavier than the top end race wheels, but still saving you several pounds of rotating mass over the low grade wheels on our bikes) in the $900 to $1200 range. The real treat, if you have the ways and means, is a pair of BST Carbon Fiber wheels, almost never sold used and going for around $4000 new.

On my '94 900SS I found a pair of Marchesini Kompe forged aluminum wheels for sale used off of a track bike being parted out. I have the numbers somewhere, but I think it came out to removing 6 lbs off the front wheel and almost 10 lbs off the rear. I got even luckier that they were anodized gold and kept the same basic color aesthetic on the bike.
Mmmmmm I have never considered changing the wheels before. Probably as each bike I had iether had more power than I could use or was used as a cart horse. But I see how this might benifit our SS which could do with a little more oomph.
 

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On both ends, the lighter weight needs less suspension compression/rebound leading to a much nicer and more compliant ride.
This is the biggest difference I've noticed. The best bike I've ever ridden had Ohlins Road & Track forks, an Ohlins rear shock, and forged aluminum wheels. I've ridden the individual suspension components on other bikes but when you combined them with the light-weight wheels the results were staggeringly good. The bumpy track where I got a test-ride literally felt like it had been completely repaved!
 

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@psyopper - My background is that I've been riding on the street for almost 30 years and on various roads and bikes over those years. I agree that high end wheels make a difference, but I'm not good enough to extrapolate that difference from them. See, I'm a really good rider and am able to outpace most folks I encounter and almost all my friends...but I'm no professional by any stretch. My ability ends WAAAAAY before the ability of the stock wheels, let alone any upgraded ones ends. The cost to performance benefit is lost on me. No offense taken.
 

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@psyopper - My background is that I've been riding on the street for almost 30 years and on various roads and bikes over those years. I agree that high end wheels make a difference, but I'm not good enough to extrapolate that difference from them. See, I'm a really good rider and am able to outpace most folks I encounter and almost all my friends...but I'm no professional by any stretch. My ability ends WAAAAAY before the ability of the stock wheels, let alone any upgraded ones ends. The cost to performance benefit is lost on me. No offense taken.
Rotational weight will make a difference. I replaced my wheels on my push bike to lighter ones, I'm definitely not Chris Froome but I do notice the difference especially going uphill. My legs are the engine on that. On a motor bike the same will be true using less power for the same speed (a very simplistic view), the engine will be under less strain.
As for changing direction I'm not gifted enough to justify the cost to appreciate the difference.
I too would not notice the difference but I'm sure my engine would, whether that justifies the price or not.....not for me but each to there own.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Rotational weight will make a difference. I replaced my wheels on my push bike to lighter ones, I'm definitely not Chris Froome but I do notice the difference especially going uphill. My legs are the engine on that. On a motor bike the same will be true using less power for the same speed (a very simplistic view), the engine will be under less strain.
As for changing direction I'm not gifted enough to justify the cost to appreciate the difference.
I too would not notice the difference but I'm sure my engine would, whether that justifies the price or not.....not for me but each to there own.
Ahhh, but that's the thing, you *would* notice the difference due to the very same physics you outlined yourself. I've seen this debated eslewhere, but seriously - bikes turn because of handlebar input. All bikes, all turns, all handlebar input. Rotational speed increases the gyroscopic, so the faster you go, the lighter the wheels will seem compared to OEM.

Lighter wheels help racers turn bikes because you get faster turning from the same rider effort.

Lighter wheels help touring riders turn bikes because you get the same turning with *less* rider effort. This reduces fatigue significantly and is the first thing I noticed when I upgraded my other bike to lighter wheels. And by first, I mean it felt like a different bike the moment I pulled out of my driveway. I am, by no measurable means, a racer or knee dragger.
 

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I am back after 17 stitches just came out of my hand and looking for a lighter set of wheels. Have any one found a set that will fit the super sport? I have used Marchesini in the past and they worked well - I am thinking about carbon and have not tried carbon on a Motorcycle. The do work well on my pedal bikes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
:surprise:Just priced the Marchesini M7R Genesi in Aus AU$7,300 - about US$5,300.

The Genesi is a racing wheel and probably the lightest metallic wheel around - most sanctioning bodies require metallic wheels and disqualify carbon for safety reasons. Forged magnesium is expensive. Forged Aluminum is less so, and the Marchesini Komp's come out to about $2400 USD new. OZ Piegga come out about the same price as the BST's and same weight as the Genesi.

Carbon BST's are in the $3500 range and are the lightest of the bunch so far.
 
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