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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Lots of chatter about DQS equipped bikes on other threads, and I haven't had time to go through every thread on this forum yet. I don't mean DQS bikes being shifted manually, but are there any reporting shift problems on bikes w/o the DQS system?

I really don't like the DQS for street riding. It's nowhere near as smooth or precise as a good manual shift. I can see using it for racing, but this is a far cry from a racebike.
 

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Lots of chatter about DQS equipped bikes on other threads, and I haven't had time to go through every thread on this forum yet. I don't mean DQS bikes being shifted manually, but are there any reporting shift problems on bikes w/o the DQS system?

I really don't like the DQS for street riding. It's nowhere near as smooth or precise as a good manual shift. I can see using it for racing, but this is a far cry from a racebike.
What kind off problems are you alluding to? False neutral and hard to find neutral have been discussed countless times. Fix being building mileage, adjusting clutch lever tension, adjusting gear foot lever and shifting firm on the gear foot lever.
 

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I really don't like the DQS for street riding. It's nowhere near as smooth or precise as a good manual shift. I can see using it for racing, but this is a far cry from a racebike.
I don't know where you got this information, but my experience with the DQS has been outstanding. One could argue that it isn't needed on the street, but it works very well. Just make sure you are on the throttle during upshifts, and off the throttle for downshifts.
 

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Many of the issues are because of not having the bike set up correctly. Lowering the shift lever got rid of DQS issues for most of us. It's a new bike and people are working thru the quriks. Taking the time to learn the bike will resolve most issues. The only ones that we are still working on are the mirror and a plastic bumper on the non S model. Other than that the bike is stellar.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
What kind off problems are you alluding to? False neutral and hard to find neutral have been discussed countless times. Fix being building mileage, adjusting clutch lever tension, adjusting gear foot lever and shifting firm on the gear foot lever.
I meant to title this thread "...manual shifting BIKES" but I couldn't edit the title. I should have called it ''Non-DQS equipped bikes", because that's what I meant. After looking through threads on shifting problems I can't find any that state that the bike in question is identified as a Non-DQS machine.

What kind off problems are you alluding to?...
I'm not alluding to any particular problem, nor am I having any problem with the DQS. I just don't like the way it shifts, and can feel it operating even when I'm shifting manually, making for notchy, clunky shifts. I'd like to be able to make smoother more precise shifts manually to save wear and tear on the gearbox, so am considering removing it. Anyone want a good deal on an almost-new DQS system?

But I'd like to know if any problems are more common to DQS bikes or if they show up in both models. In other words, which problems are mechanical and inherent to the clutch/transmission, which are due to rider techniques or poor adjustment and which are caused by the DQS system?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I don't know where you got this information, but my experience with the DQS has been outstanding. One could argue that it isn't needed on the street, but it works very well. Just make sure you are on the throttle during upshifts, and off the throttle for downshifts.
Admittedly I'd prefer not having DQS involved in my shifting process, but I'm not attacking the DQS system or its proponents, I'm trying to get information. That is the point of this Forum, no? DQS is a racing system on a touring bike, and my information is based on my own experience, having ridden and raced many bikes both with and without QS.

The beauty of the Supersport is that it is NOT a racebike with a license plate. Many club racers and street riders end up defeating the gains from their quick shifters due to adjustment/set up errors. The same can be said for slipper clutches for example. A good rider certainly doesn't need TC/DQS/Slipper Clutch etc on a bike at this level, and improperly set-up systems are worse than none.

This seems to be a theme here. I'm simply trying to find out if a basic Non-DQS equipped Ducati Supersport
is having as many as, or the same shifting issues as the DQS models. I don't claim to know, which is why I asked.

Thanks for your kind indulgence.
 

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I meant to title this thread "...manual shifting BIKES" but I couldn't edit the title. I should have called it ''Non-DQS equipped bikes", because that's what I meant. After looking through threads on shifting problems I can't find any that state that the bike in question is identified as a Non-DQS machine.



I'm not alluding to any particular problem, nor am I having any problem with the DQS. I just don't like the way it shifts, and can feel it operating even when I'm shifting manually, making for notchy, clunky shifts. I'd like to be able to make smoother more precise shifts manually to save wear and tear on the gearbox, so am considering removing it. Anyone want a good deal on an almost-new DQS system?

But I'd like to know if any problems are more common to DQS bikes or if they show up in both models. In other words, which problems are mechanical and inherent to the clutch/transmission, which are due to rider techniques or poor adjustment and which are caused by the DQS system?
I have a non-DQS and what mentioned was related to it. I have no experience on the DQS, even though I test rode one, cause i shifted manually due to habit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I have a non-DQS and what mentioned was related to it. I have no experience on the DQS, even though I test rode one, cause i shifted manually due to habit.
Cool! So is there any consensus among Non-DQS bike owners? Any common shift problems other than hard-to-find-neutral? (Hint: slip it into neutral with the clutch engaged while still rolling)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Many of the issues are because of not having the bike set up correctly. Lowering the shift lever got rid of DQS issues for most of us. It's a new bike and people are working thru the quriks. Taking the time to learn the bike will resolve most issues. The only ones that we are still working on are the mirror and a plastic bumper on the non S model. Other than that the bike is stellar.
I agree with your summary BW1 (Eww, ticks), and since this thread took off in a DQS direction for a while I might as well jump in too.

I would use the DQS on the track, but only if it the shift pattern is reversed for GP shift. I suspect that many missed shifts people experience would be improved, not to mention keeping the chassis more stable, if they were pressing down for an upshift with the lever positioned lower for a natural fluid motion rather than jerking up on the shift lever, especially when tucked for speed. Conversely, downshifts are done with the rider more upright, and by lifting the lever up, done more purposefully than jamming the lever down.

I found two threads addressing GP Shift for DQS bikes. No replies on either, so apparently no one on this Forum has addressed this procedure yet, or been curious enough to comment. I'll see what I can stir up.

http://www.ducatisupersport939.net/forum/87401-post2.html
 

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I have DQS, but use it selectively... depending on conditions.

Rather than remove it, consider turning up or down, or both, off electronically through the provided user control functionalities.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
I have DQS, but use it selectively... depending on conditions.

Rather than remove it, consider turning up or down, or both, off electronically through the provided user control functionalities.
Amazing! That's what I read about in the manual today. :grin2: Turned it OFF, discovered that the gearbox is simply harsh. It slams into gear. It actually seemed to help turning the DQS back on, and like you, I shifted over the DQS and it seemed less harsh. Subjective I know, but I'll keep working on it.

It's fine for aggressive shifting, but I don't have high hopes for the gearbox's longevity if this continues. My ST2 is still smooth and precise as can be with 65,000 miles on it.
 

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Have a look at the electrical diagram. I am on the phone writing this so no chance of me booting up the laptop. My guess there are two signal wires and ground. I suspect you will be changing the rear sets too and not obly the changing order. Aftermarket I suspect will be a trial and error however 2nd hand pani might be available and work. Swop the signal wires around if you can open the transducer
 

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I meant to title this thread "...manual shifting BIKES" but I couldn't edit the title. I should have called it ''Non-DQS equipped bikes", because that's what I meant. After looking through threads on shifting problems I can't find any that state that the bike in question is identified as a Non-DQS machine.



I'm not alluding to any particular problem, nor am I having any problem with the DQS. I just don't like the way it shifts, and can feel it operating even when I'm shifting manually, making for notchy, clunky shifts. I'd like to be able to make smoother more precise shifts manually to save wear and tear on the gearbox, so am considering removing it. Anyone want a good deal on an almost-new DQS system?

But I'd like to know if any problems are more common to DQS bikes or if they show up in both models. In other words, which problems are mechanical and inherent to the clutch/transmission, which are due to rider techniques or poor adjustment and which are caused by the DQS system?
Topic renamed.....let me know if that works!
 

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While using DQS I have experienced the following . . .
- Missed shifts/False gear changes (bike shows it's in one gear but either is in a neutral or other gear position.
- Syncros not working correctly during 4th-5th shift causing gear "crunching"
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
This from the GP Shift thread

O.K. A bit of complexity in shifting the DQS bike, and an idea of why even shifting w/the DQS OFF can feel a little indirect.

Not a lot of room to play with on the S model w/DQS. They call the linkage from the shift lever to the countershaft shift arm the GEARBOX TRANSMISSION ROD ASSEMBLY, which fits into the DETECTOR unit up front, and there must be damping spring inside the Detector ASSBLY to prevent the Rod from bouncing, which would cause the engine to cut out intermittently.

Close ups are of the Shift rod and Shift Detector in action. Images are, from left to right:

1)Shifter at rest.
2 On downshift the rod appears to lengthen as it extends from the Detector Assbly in front.
3)On upshift the rod appears to shorten as it plunges into the Detector.

The base model uses a conventional solid rod w/heim joints at either end called a GEARBOX DRIVING ROD. This makes for a direct mechanical linkage with slightly shorter throw since it doesn't have to move that small distance in/out of a Detector and no springs are involved.
Not much room for error w/the DQS linkage adjustment. Check what others have done to improve shifting. It looks like adjusting the angle of the foot shift lever down gives improved power and accuracy in the shift.
 

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