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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When I was picking up my long-awaited Supersport S last week, I got a bunch of advice from my salesman that is very questionable in retrospect. He told me lots of things, but two stand out as being very important:
  • The break-in period for the engine is 75 miles. I should keep it in Touring or Urban mode for the first 75 miles, and after that I should put it through its paces and ride it hard.
  • "Tonight, when you get home, read the manual cover-to-cover."

75 miles sounded a little too good to be true, but I didn't grill him on it, nor did I bother to check the manual that he had just handed me. I knew that I could knock out 75 miles before noon, so I went out and did it. Then I put the bike through its paces, just like he said. Clown stuff, red-lining, consistent high RPMs, whatever. Then I got home with a gigantic smile on my face, spent about half an hour reading the manual, and nearly had a heart attack when I got to the part where it says that you're not supposed to exceed 7,000 RPM for the first 1,500 miles, AND that the engine warranty is void if you don't abide by the break-in period. I've been some combination of heartbroken and extremely pissed for the last few days. I've been meaning to talk to the head of service at my dealership or maybe at a totally different dealership to get the real story, but I get too angry every time I go to pick up the phone.

What have you all heard about the break in period from your dealers? And WHAT HAVE I DONE TO MY BIKE?
 

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The manufacturer sets the break in period, not the dealer. It seems like many people don't follow the break in period anyway and nothing catastrophic ever happens....if you believe what you read on the internet. Next time you buy a machine, listen to your gut when something sounds too good to be true, and don't assume what the SALES person tells you is based on fact.
 

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When I was picking up my long-awaited Supersport S last week, I got a bunch of advice from my salesman that is very questionable in retrospect. He told me lots of things, but two stand out as being very important:
  • The break-in period for the engine is 75 miles. I should keep it in Touring or Urban mode for the first 75 miles, and after that I should put it through its paces and ride it hard.
  • "Tonight, when you get home, read the manual cover-to-cover."

75 miles sounded a little too good to be true, but I didn't grill him on it, nor did I bother to check the manual that he had just handed me. I knew that I could knock out 75 miles before noon, so I went out and did it. Then I put the bike through its paces, just like he said. Clown stuff, red-lining, consistent high RPMs, whatever. Then I got home with a gigantic smile on my face, spent about half an hour reading the manual, and nearly had a heart attack when I got to the part where it says that you're not supposed to exceed 7,000 RPM for the first 1,500 miles, AND that the engine warranty is void if you don't abide by the break-in period. I've been some combination of heartbroken and extremely pissed for the last few days. I've been meaning to talk to the head of service at my dealership or maybe at a totally different dealership to get the real story, but I get too angry every time I go to pick up the phone.

What have you all heard about the break in period from your dealers? And WHAT HAVE I DONE TO MY BIKE?

A few thoughts. A dealer I know says look after it for the first few hundred and it will be fine-they say they have never seen a Ducati with a problem because of not running in. The first service is the key one because they use thinner oil/lube to start with. Think about test bikes. I tested an SS at 30 miles and whilst I was mainly good, lots of others wouldn't be. Other vehicles don't need run ins these days and a mate of mine says it's a manufacturer conspiracy on bikes to stop new owners going nuts on fast bikes straight away without bedding themselves in. So whilst not ideal, take it easy until the new oil goes in and enjoy the bike! Life is too short to worry about what might be! 0:)
 

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You forgot to heed to his second point :wink2:

Correct Break in procedures for motorcycles are debated as much as government policies and invoke similar strong opinions.

Modern day engines are pretty resilient - your Supersport engine should be fine, just ensure you get the oil change at first 600 miles :smile2:
 

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I think you'll be fine, but it's not what I'd do.

I think you need to talk with the dealer manager and get at least an extra years warranty on them. Then kick the salesman around the room. From now on stick to what it says in the book.

Vehicle manufacturers know their product better than any one. They design them, specify the tolerances and materials it's made of, they stand the warranty if it should fail too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
You forgot to heed to his second point :wink2:
I followed his instructions exactly! I picked up the bike in the morning, "broke it in" before noon, abused the engine all afternoon, then went home and read the manual cover to cover, just like he told me to! All on Day 1. :mad:

Right now I'm just practicing my "WOOSAH" and trying to convince myself it's not worth worring about. But I'd like to ask my dealer to agree to partially subsidize an engine rebuild in the future, if I still want to a few years from now. Legally, I'm sure they have no obligation to, but I'm hoping they'll either be good guys about it, or at the very least, give me a highly technical and convincing explanation about how I didn't permanently scar my engine.
 

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... Legally, I'm sure they have no obligation to, but I'm hoping they'll either be good guys about it, or at the very least, give me a highly technical and convincing explanation about how I didn't permanently scar my engine.
At least let them know that their salesman is spreading false information.


PhilB
 

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I followed his instructions exactly! I picked up the bike in the morning, "broke it in" before noon, abused the engine all afternoon, then went home and read the manual cover to cover, just like he told me to! All on Day 1. :mad:

Right now I'm just practicing my "WOOSAH" and trying to convince myself it's not worth worring about. But I'd like to ask my dealer to agree to partially subsidize an engine rebuild in the future, if I still want to a few years from now. Legally, I'm sure they have no obligation to, but I'm hoping they'll either be good guys about it, or at the very least, give me a highly technical and convincing explanation about how I didn't permanently scar my engine.
Unless you had red-lined the crap out of it, you wouldn't have done any permanent damage, let alone worry about future engine rebuilds!!!

Me and my mate bought street triples almost at the same time, I stuck to the break-in period as per the book, and my mate didn't. The only difference we found was that mine runs a little smoother than his.
 

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When I was picking up my long-awaited Supersport S last week, I got a bunch of advice from my salesman that is very questionable in retrospect. He told me lots of things, but two stand out as being very important:
  • The break-in period for the engine is 75 miles. I should keep it in Touring or Urban mode for the first 75 miles, and after that I should put it through its paces and ride it hard.
  • "Tonight, when you get home, read the manual cover-to-cover."

75 miles sounded a little too good to be true, but I didn't grill him on it, nor did I bother to check the manual that he had just handed me. I knew that I could knock out 75 miles before noon, so I went out and did it. Then I put the bike through its paces, just like he said. Clown stuff, red-lining, consistent high RPMs, whatever. Then I got home with a gigantic smile on my face, spent about half an hour reading the manual, and nearly had a heart attack when I got to the part where it says that you're not supposed to exceed 7,000 RPM for the first 1,500 miles, AND that the engine warranty is void if you don't abide by the break-in period. I've been some combination of heartbroken and extremely pissed for the last few days. I've been meaning to talk to the head of service at my dealership or maybe at a totally different dealership to get the real story, but I get too angry every time I go to pick up the phone.

What have you all heard about the break in period from your dealers? And WHAT HAVE I DONE TO MY BIKE?
Are you reading the manual for the SuperSport??!? I took the manual home with me when I went to do my paperwork on Saturday. Per page 245, "Running-In Recommendations" - up to 600mi, it is recommended not to exceed 5,500-6,000 RPM. During first few hours of driving, run the engine at varying loads and RPM's, and for the first 60mi, avoid hard braking so as to allow the brake pads to bed in with the discs.
 

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I think our salesmen went to the same Bad Salesman School.

After reading many of the posts on here, I received my SS last Friday and vaguely remembered some complaints on the forum about having to baby the bike for the first 600 miles. I asked my salesman about a running-in period and this is what he said:

"Ride it like you would normally ride it. I mean, I wouldn't run it at 10,000 rpm for the next three hours, but vary the RPMs and you will be fine." I specifically asked him about rev limits and he said there weren't any. I sensed the vague whiff of marijuana in the air as he said this. Just kidding.

Anyway, I followed his instructions, but I didn't go crazy. When I got home, I read the manual. The manual actually says, "Never exceed 6,000 RPMs in the first 600 miles." When I read this, I was nearly as upset as redshirt. What a numbnuts.

Like someone said earlier, listen to the manufacturer not the brain-dead salesman. Anyway, redshirt, I too, think you and your bike will be fine. And....

...this bike is one fun mother!!
 

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Are you reading the manual for the SuperSport??!? I took the manual home with me when I went to do my paperwork on Saturday. Per page 245, "Running-In Recommendations" - up to 600mi, it is recommended not to exceed 5,500-6,000 RPM. During first few hours of driving, run the engine at varying loads and RPM's, and for the first 60mi, avoid hard braking so as to allow the brake pads to bed in with the discs.
Then it continues to say stay below 7000 until 1500 miles. See below, this is page two of running in instructions and could easliy be missed.

Furthermore, the drive chain should be inspected
frequently. Lubricate as required.
From 1000 km (600 mi) to 2500 km (1553 mi).
At this point, you can squeeze some more power out
of your engine. However never exceed 7,000 rpm.
 

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Then it continues to say stay below 7000 until 1500 miles. See below, this is page two of running in instructions and could easliy be missed.

Furthermore, the drive chain should be inspected
frequently. Lubricate as required.
From 1000 km (600 mi) to 2500 km (1553 mi).
At this point, you can squeeze some more power out
of your engine. However never exceed 7,000 rpm.
At my average rate by the time the east coast sees the bike... I will have it broken in for next season
 

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"I asked my salesman about a running-in period and this is what he said:"

I don't understand why anyone would do this. The salesman sells bikes why do you expect him to have Ducati's design knowledge? You should have asked the factory, but then they wrote it in the manual so that you would know. Perhaps the salesman cannot read and that is why he only sells bikes.

If I asked the chap who delivers mail to our local doctors surgery, if he would give me a medical exam, would that be any different?
 

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... Perhaps the salesman cannot read and that is why he only sells bikes.

If I asked the chap who delivers mail to our local doctors surgery, if he would give me a medical exam, would that be any different?
That would be different, as that's a totally different field. I would expect a competent salesman to know the products he sells; that's part of his job. If I sold bikes, I would know and be able to advise my customers on the care and maintenance, on the performance, on how it compares to ride with its competitors, on other aspects of the machine. I certainly would be sure not to give the customers false info; if I didn't know, I'd say I didn't know, and tell them I'd find out and get back to them. But then, I guess that's why I'm an engineer and not a salesman.


PhilB
 

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........ I certainly would be sure not to give the customers false info; if I didn't know, I'd say I didn't know, and tell them I'd find out and get back to them. But then, I guess that's why I'm an engineer and not a salesman.
PhilB
Exactly. :grin2:

It is rare to come across a salesman who is actually a motorcycle enthusiast. At the going rate for bike sales personnel they are seldom specialists but more along the likes of general specialists. They could be selling phones one week, cars the next, or motorcycles. Being able to easily transition to various products is to their benefit, and a detriment to their customers. As in most everything, there can be exceptions.
 

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I wouldn't stress about it if I were you, Redshirt. There are some pretty fierce debates that go around regarding the best way to run in a new bike. I wouldn't want to do a track day on a new bike or red line it for sustained periods of time, simply because the 'bedding in' engine oil from the factory isn't the highest quality, but it's not crap either.
These engines are ready to go, straight from the factory. Your quiet first 75 miles will have been enough. Go back to what the manual says from now on, and who knows, maybe you've done the bike a favor!
Jump on Google and you'll find some interesting stuff about running in bikes.
 

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This is older information I once copied down, but I would guess it is true still and true for the SS:

Every Ducati engine is run-in for ten minutes or more on the dyno using a prescribed rpm and temperature sequence. The piston rings seal is mostly complete after this initial test run. The follow-up part of the break-in that you read in your Owners Manual has little to do with piston ring sealing. It’s meant to accommodate the time it takes for normal wear to occur to thousands of mating parts.

The initial break-in period is actually the final finishing step in manufacturing an engine. At the factory, Ducati hones the cylinder walls to a fine finish, grinds cams to accurate, smooth profiles, and makes connecting rod journals to high standards of roundness and accuracy. But, metal surfaces are still microscopically rough, consisting of tiny peaks and valleys. When you start a new engine, these surfaces must slide over each other and wherever the peaks stick up higher than the local oil film thickness, metal hits metal, welds momentarily from the intense local pressure, and then tears away. The oil flushes away these bits of metal, and the oil filter removes them from circulation.

This process works quickly at first, then more slowly as break-in proceeds. Once the high spots are knocked off or pushed down, the roughness of the surfaces no longer sticks above the oil films. Piston rings have filed themselves into a fine fit to their cylinders. Bearings spin without metal-to-metal contact, on full oil films.

If you decide to ignore Ducati’s recommendation that engine rpm be limited for the break-in period and instead you run at high rpm and heavy throttle (trips to the red line), the wear process may generate more heat and metal debris than the lubrication system can handle. Then the result is destruction of contact surfaces in some parts of the engine.

If you use Ducati’s break-in method and gradually build up to higher revs and throttle, the washing action of the oil will keep up with the generation of wear particles, and the surfaces will bed into each other in such a way that the oil film can carry the load.

Finally, the initial period of moderate operation needs to be followed by some hard acceleration and brief trips to the red line. Sustained, high-speed operation (i.e., 5,000 rpm for 25 minutes) is not a good idea because it provides no wash time at low load, during which the oil system can flush away any wear particles.
 
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