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....well not unnecessary from a wear perspective but perhaps not cost effective.

I'd like to see the numbers and why sprockets costs more for Ducs. :surprise:
Depends on what you get. Sprocketcenter has a kit with chain, front and rear sprockets, with a quick change carrier for the SS for $329, depending on what chain you add.

https://sprocketcenter.com/street-sprocket-applications/ducati/939-supersport-2017-2019/520-conversion-kit-quick-change-sprocket-set-with-your-choice-of-x-ring-chain-ducati-1199-1299-panigale-panigale.html

I plan on changing the cush drive when I do the full replacement, so that's gonna bump it up to almost $500. That's with me doing the labor. The chain by itself is around $140 on Amazon, so yeah, I'll just be doing the chain the first time around.
 

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....well not unnecessary from a wear perspective but perhaps not cost effective.

I'd like to see the numbers and why sprockets costs more for Ducs. :surprise:
Decent sprockets are normally around $40-50 for rear, $25 or so front if you go aftermarket and not OEM. A decent chain is in the $100-$150 range.

Is it the exact same cost, no, but say $75 for sprockets and $100 for a chain, it's close enough for discussion.
 

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Decent sprockets are normally around $40-50 for rear, $25 or so front if you go aftermarket and not OEM. A decent chain is in the $100-$150 range.

Is it the exact same cost, no, but say $75 for sprockets and $100 for a chain, it's close enough for discussion.
well that's about the same as my other chain driven bikes, $75 for sprockets and another $125-150 for a chain (that chain appears to be pretty long). For those numbers I'd replace the sprockets everytime.

Now 1UB has me in wonderland. I am not familiar with a quick change carrier (but assume it's a one time cost). Are the cush drives a high wear item? I've never replaced them.
 

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Decent sprockets are normally around $40-50 for rear, $25 or so front if you go aftermarket and not OEM. A decent chain is in the $100-$150 range.

Is it the exact same cost, no, but say $75 for sprockets and $100 for a chain, it's close enough for discussion.
You should introduce us to your supplier. We could all do with paying those prices. Any links available?
 

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well that's about the same as my other chain driven bikes, $75 for sprockets and another $125-150 for a chain (that chain appears to be pretty long). For those numbers I'd replace the sprockets everytime.

Now 1UB has me in wonderland. I am not familiar with a quick change carrier (but assume it's a one time cost). Are the cush drives a high wear item? I've never replaced them.
They aren't a high wear item, but I have seen what they can do when they wear. Once the rubber starts to crack, the cush drives can back out and start to wear the hub where your spanner turns the entire hub. Here's a link.
How to lose unsprung rear weight (single-sided swingarm cush drive joys)

The odds are probably rare, but worth changing for preventive maintenance, IMO.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Good discussion here! I think I'm leaning towards only replacing the chain since I can do it myself fairly easily, put a snap link on the chain and drive it slowly to the dealer where they can rivet it on properly in about a minute or two.

But are we in agreement that my chain needs replacing based on the video I posted? :p
 

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Mine was complety shot as wel @ 24.500 km. Just changed mine voor a Tsubaki chain. The Tsubaki chain is a bit wider and stronger as well. The rear sprocket of our model specifiek is more expensive than reguler model because of the construction.


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Good discussion here! I think I'm leaning towards only replacing the chain since I can do it myself fairly easily, put a snap link on the chain and drive it slowly to the dealer where they can rivet it on properly in about a minute or two.

But are we in agreement that my chain needs replacing based on the video I posted? :p
Yes, the chain is shot, not horribly so, but it is.

The side plate of a clip type link needs to be pressed on. Sure you can struggle with a set of pliers and get it on. The cost of the clip master link $5 to $10 and a lot of hassle to fit. Then you have to spend time riding to the dealer and hanging around, and then get a bill for $60? for riveting the chain (rivet type usually supplied with the chain).

Alternatively, you spend $90 and buy an RK Chain tool (don't even think of getting anything else) and now you'll be able to perfectly and easily press on the side plates of both clip and rivet master links and do perfect flairs each and every time for the rest of your life.

Anyone who can't do a perfect job riveting a master link with an RK Chain tool, the 'rolls-royce' of chain tools, shouldn't be doing anything mechanical to a motorcycle. You don't even need to measure anything, it'll press the side plate on the exact correct distance (different for clip and rivet type master links).

P.S. Just remember to grind the heads of the pins of the link where you plan to separate the chain. You'll bust just about any tool trying to do it without removing the heads. I find a small 6" angle grinder perfect for the job.
 

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But are we in agreement that my chain needs replacing based on the video I posted? :p
Perhaps for the sake of the discussion, its worth explaining why the chain is shot.

When a chain is new it will be exactly the same pitch (distance between the links) as the distance between the sprocket teeth, and as such be a tight fit around the full back half of the sprocket. As the chain stretches (it doesn't stretch as such, but every pin on the chain wears a tiny amount) the chain pitch increases and eventually it no longer matches the sprocket. That's reflected in the amount you can pull the now longer chain away from the back of the sprocket.

It can't simply be adjusted out because the chain is already locked into the sprocket at the very top and bottom teeth of the sprocket. The amount you can pull the chain back is the amount the chain is now longer than those two points. You can tighten the chain up as tight as a guitar string, and the pullback at the back of the sprocket will still be there.

Run a stretched chain that no longer matches the sprocket pitch and the next thing that happens is the sprocket teeth will start to hook badly. A typical workshop manual will have you evaluate the serviceability of a drive chain by measuring the distance between X pins. Checking the chain for stretch at the back of the sprocket is doing virtually the same thing, but just using the sprocket as a template. If the chain can be pulled back any significant amount the chain has 'stretched' beyond its acceptable service limit.
 

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Great post. Got me to rethink my psylosothy on sprocket replacement. In the past I've always worn the chain out and replaced the set. But after looking up the price of the sprocket I decided to replace the chain at the first sign of wear - 11,000 mls for me. I'll wear out the second chain and then replace the set.
 

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Great post. Got me to rethink my psylosothy on sprocket replacement. In the past I've always worn the chain out and replaced the set. But after looking up the price of the sprocket I decided to replace the chain at the first sign of wear - 11,000 mls for me. I'll wear out the second chain and then replace the set.
Strategy will work just fine. It's an ill fitting chain that does 90% (just made that number up) of the wear to a sprocket.

I run alloy rear sprockets on my bike (not a SS), and as long as you don't run a shot chain its surprising how good a shape they retain. Probably different on a heavy or 200hp bike. I do still replace the chain and sprockets but that is just being anal. Even the alloy rear sprocket could easily go round a second time.
 

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Great post. Got me to rethink my psylosothy on sprocket replacement. In the past I've always worn the chain out and replaced the set. But after looking up the price of the sprocket I decided to replace the chain at the first sign of wear - 11,000 mls for me. I'll wear out the second chain and then replace the set.
My thoughts too. OEM chain showed signs of rust so I put on the X Ring DID. Next change will be a full set. Every second change will include sprockets.
 
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