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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I didn't make it to the Desmo service prior to requiring a new chain. On my last road trip the chain stretched so much that it needed to be adjusted prior to completion of the ride. I stopped at a dealership in Klamath Falls, OR selling Japanese motorcycles. They refused to work on an Italian motorcycle. Fortunately they told me about an independent shop called Airheads. The owner had an adjustable "C" spanner, but needed to borrow a T60 to loosen the set screw (bolt). He adjusted the chain to specification. It was good that the chain adjustment specs were on a sticker on the swing arm.

By the time I arrived back in Las Vegas the chain had stretched some more.

The Las Vegas Ducati Dealer replaced the chain and sprockets, I think the cost was quite expensive. I paid almost $700 for the new chain and sprockets.

In another 1500 mi I will need to go back for my Desmo service. That will set me back $1500. I will probably need new tires by then.
 

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I didn't make it to the Desmo service prior to requiring a new chain. On my last road trip the chain stretched so much that it needed to be adjusted prior to completion of the ride. I stopped at a dealership in Klamath Falls, OR selling Japanese motorcycles. They refused to work on an Italian motorcycle. Fortunately they told me about an independent shop called Airheads. The owner had an adjustable "C" spanner, but needed to borrow a T60 to loosen the set screw (bolt). He adjusted the chain to specification. It was good that the chain adjustment specs were on a sticker on the swing arm.

By the time I arrived back in Las Vegas the chain had stretched some more.

The Las Vegas Ducati Dealer replaced the chain and sprockets, I think the cost was quite expensive. I paid almost $700 for the new chain and sprockets.

In another 1500 mi I will need to go back for my Desmo service. That will set me back $1500. I will probably need new tires by then.
Wow. I know it doesn't help but a sprocket and chain set can be had for around US$150. That's for a good chain.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Wow. I know it doesn't help but a sprocket and chain set can be had for around US$150. That's for a good chain.
It helps a lot because I will replace the chain and sprockets myself next time. I have a T60 and will buy a "C" spanner. I will get a steel socket to remove the rear sprocket. I assume I will not need to remove the rear wheel.

Any recommendations where to purchase a set without going to the dealer?
 

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It helps a lot because I will replace the chain and sprockets myself next time. I have a T60 and will buy a "C" spanner. I will get a steel socket to remove the rear sprocket. I assume I will not need to remove the rear wheel.

Any recommendations where to purchase a set without going to the dealer?
Torque wrench and power bar will be needed to. Rear nuts are 230nm. Using a torque wrench to undo the nuts has been known to damage its calibration so a power bar may need to be used. Tool setup is pricey but worth it in the long run.
Tools required for front and rear sprocket change are:
Multi sided pit stand. Capable of left and right side.
4mm Allen key for front sprocket cover.
12mm Allen key for the back of the cush drive.
12mm open end spanner to hold the Allen key
14mm bi hex socket for rear sprocket nuts.
T60 torx for eccentric hub.
C spanner.
55mm bi hex socket
Torque wrench of 180nm- 230nm
Torque wrench of 20-45nm
32mm hex socket for front sprocket (could be 30mm)
Angle grinder to cut old chain.
Chain riveter.
Wheel bearing grease or copper compound.

Cost adds up but they are once off costs. You might want to balance cost versus benefit, you could decide to pay the labour if they have the tools. Like taking the chain and sprockets kit to the dealer.

Edit: To remove the rear sprocket you will find it easier to remove the rear wheel otherwise you'll struggle trying to remove the sprocket nuts. 12mm Allen key needs slotting into the rear of the cush whilst you unloosen the sprocket nuts.
Also, you'll need a 2nd person to press on the rear brake to lock the wheel down. Don't use the gearbox like some have done, you could shear something.
You can take off the rear sprocket without removing the wheel and use a vice to hold the 12mm Allen key.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have a stand already which would be the greatest expense. I still need to buy the "C" spanner and the 55 mm bi hex socket and the 32 mm hex socket. I will also purchase a chain tool.

Even if I don't replace the chain myself, I want to get a "C" spanner after my experience on the road trying to get the chain adjusted.
@amoslws I really appreciate your being so helpful.
 

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Wow, interesting, my chain has only required adjustment once with almost 11,000 miles on the clock, including a 5000 mile trip. I brought tools to adjust it on the trip, but it wasn’t needed.

I lube it every 200 miles if it doesn’t get wet. On my tour, I lubed it daily.

I’m a light rider, but do let it rip with every ride, and luggage was heavily loaded with tools and equipment on the tour.

What about others, how often are you guys finding chain adjustment is needed?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Wow, interesting, my chain has only required adjustment once with almost 11,000 miles on the clock, including a 5000 mile trip. I brought tools to adjust it on the trip, but it wasn’t needed.

I lube it every 200 miles if it doesn’t get wet. On my tour, I lubed it daily.

I’m a light rider, but do let it rip with every ride, and luggage was heavily loaded with tools and equipment on the tour.

What about others, how often are you guys finding chain adjustment is needed?
Mine was fine at 11,000 mi. With "O" rings I wonder if lubing is any benefit. I think cleaning would be beneficial.
 

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I didn't make it to the Desmo service prior to requiring a new chain. On my last road trip the chain stretched so much that it needed to be adjusted prior to completion of the ride. I stopped at a dealership in Klamath Falls, OR selling Japanese motorcycles. They refused to work on an Italian motorcycle. Fortunately they told me about an independent shop called Airheads. The owner had an adjustable "C" spanner, but needed to borrow a T60 to loosen the set screw (bolt). He adjusted the chain to specification. It was good that the chain adjustment specs were on a sticker on the swing arm.

By the time I arrived back in Las Vegas the chain had stretched some more.

The Las Vegas Ducati Dealer replaced the chain and sprockets, I think the cost was quite expensive. I paid almost $700 for the new chain and sprockets.

In another 1500 mi I will need to go back for my Desmo service. That will set me back $1500. I will probably need new tires by then.
Yikes. Sprockets are more expensive for this bike than for Japanese bikes. That's why I replace sprockets every other chain, provided the teeth look good. I can get at least 15k miles out of a quality chain when I don't replace the sprockets. Also, I only get steel sprockets. They last longer.
 

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It helps a lot because I will replace the chain and sprockets myself next time. I have a T60 and will buy a "C" spanner. I will get a steel socket to remove the rear sprocket. I assume I will not need to remove the rear wheel.

Any recommendations where to purchase a set without going to the dealer?
Sprocketcenter. For the rear sprocket without a carrier, a front gear, and a chain, you'll pay about $200.
 

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Looks very interesting, have you or anyone you know tried it?
On this bike, no. I have a 520 series Superlite aluminum rear sprocket and matching steel front sprocket with a DiD XRV chain on my '94 900SS and it looks like new at 5000 miles. I do use the Dupont chain wax regularly on it. You can choose the steel rear sprocket for longevity, if that's your thing.
 
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Hi,

For those who changed the kit, did you equally changed the rubber cush drive hub?
N°9

I have 18000 miles, normaly they shouldn't be too damaged and could resist to the next change.

And do you have an idea why this kit is low priced?

It's in German, but just to explain: Chain x ring, rivet lock and 520 pitch which is the most important. And 14/43 sprocket available.
Really strange!
 

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I might change the sprockets and chain myself. One thing I am nervous of is installing a new chain.
I have never peened a chain, easy enough?
It will help to get a chain breaker and rivet tool. If you don't have the tools, bring it to a shop. You'll also need an impact driver to get the front sprocket off and on too. Any local shop will do it and won't ask much. It will help to order the chain through the service shop and have it taken care of.

The rear sprocket is the only peculiar piece that you should consider to order for yourself since most of the domestic suppliers might not locate one. Or order all the parts and pay the labor.
 
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