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I just purchased a 2019MY Supersport S (used). Previous owner had fitted the Competition Werkes GP pipe and also the Termignoni T800 UpMap. I started some online discussion with the UpMap team and they were very helpful. They suggested that I disconnect the Lambda sensor connectors (but can leave the sensors installed in the pipes). This will enable the flashed UpMap 'map' to control the fuelling and spark, rather than the ECU adjusting at lower rpm based on the lambda sensor signals. I've followed the lambda sensor wiring but my hand cannot reach the connectors. Can anyone advise where the connectors are located and what I may have to remove to access them (so I can disconnect/unclip and insulate them). Any assistance/images appreciated.
I thought if Ducati is in "Evo" mode, it means It runs in open loop mode. That means it doesn't care about lambda sensor and doesn't actuate the servo for the butterfly flap or the fueling with reading from lamda sensor anymore.
So, whether the sensor is connected or not, it shouldn't make any difference after upmap and dashboard shows Evo.

I would say Termignoni customer service should really ask their engineering about this, because it doesn't make sense.
The fact they wrote sensor can be removed it would be for aesthetics reason not bike operation reason.
Who knows, I might be wrong !
 

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I’m not clear myself what is correct. To be accurate Termi customer service did not say I should remove the sensor, they said the bike will run better if the Lambda sensor is disconnected. Has anyone tried to unplug the lambda sensor electrical wiring loom connectors (leaving the physical lambda sensor still in the exhaust)?
 

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I’m not clear myself what is correct. To be accurate Termi customer service did not say I should remove the sensor, they said the bike will run better if the Lambda sensor is disconnected. Has anyone tried to unplug the lambda sensor electrical wiring loom connectors (leaving the physical lambda sensor still in the exhaust)?
But I think that’s the point in the post above: if the sensor isn’t doing anything, and it shouldn’t be if the upmap EVO is installed, it shouldn’t matter if it’s plugged in or not. My thought is if the ECU is taking readings from it, you’ll trigger a check engine light if you unplug it.

It seems to me like there’s a disconnect between operation and what they are telling you to do.
 

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But I think that’s the point in the post above: if the sensor isn’t doing anything, and it shouldn’t be if the upmap EVO is installed, it shouldn’t matter if it’s plugged in or not. My thought is if the ECU is taking readings from it, you’ll trigger a check engine light if you unplug it.

It seems to me like there’s a disconnect between operation and what they are telling you to do.
Please see attached screenshot of email I received from UpMap. Thoughts?
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Please see attached screenshot of email I received from UpMap. Thoughts? View attachment 42575
How lame of the system to be designed like this !!
The harnesses for these probes is buried deep under the tank and would require some effort to dig them up and disconnect them :)
I will probably ask for it on my next service.

I noticed that bike is a bit unresponsive on a cold start at low RPMs, not sure if that's the reason or not.
 

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Maybe our Akra friends can help here. Does Ducati remove the O2 sensor from the back header pipe when they install the Akra pipes?

Edit: From pics, Looks like it's still there, but maybe they unplug the cable under the bensin tank.

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Please see attached screenshot of email I received from UpMap. Thoughts? View attachment 42575
I would agree with the above poster that it’s a pretty lame design if they can disable the error code if you pull them but not be able to make the system ignore the values. I suppose it’s two different places in the ECU programming but still.........
 

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Please see attached screenshot of email I received from UpMap. Thoughts? View attachment 42575
I've never heard of this. I'd assumed that the lambdas were disabled and were just plugging the holes in the headers. Strange that they should leave them having an effect on fueling but disabling any error message. Next time I'm in there I'll disconnect them and see what the result is.
 

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OK, so I spent a few hours in the garage on Saturday and successfully disconnected the lambda sensors. Following a test ride on Sunday I am pleased to report that there is a noticeable improvement in sub 4,000rpm engine driveability. I followed the owner manual instructions plus referred to some fairing and fuel tank removal YouTube videos by Brandon Pryor. If you have never removed the Supersport fairings, I can tell you that as long as you have time, patience and good light it is actually quite simple. Some tips...follow the order of removing screws and fasteners as per the owner’s manual. First step is removing the horizontal dark panels that sit either side of the steering. Undo the two screws (noting one is longer than the other). I strongly recommend small sandwich bags (or equivalent) that you can write on to identify the screws from each section of the fairings as they vary. Left and their opposite right side fairings screws are identical. There are two areas at the front where the fairing is held in the headlight structure and just follow the owner manual and ease the fairing out (the video mentioned above also helpful). There is also a section of fairing (sort of bang in the middle) that is held in by a rubber grommet). Once all the screws are undone you ease the fairing towards the back of the bike and the last grommet releases (note the section must be pulled backwards as it is 90 degrees to the other grommet/retainers).

The front cylinder’s Lambda sensor connector is low down just behind the battery. It is fairly simple to follow the wiring to confirm you have the right sensor. I’ve attached an image showing the plugs disconnected after I had wrapped them in good quality underbody car tape.

To get to the rear sensor connector you need to lift up the fuel tank. This is where it is advised to have a friend available. Remove the seat. Unscrew the screw towards front of the trim that runs under the seat - and then gently pull the front of this part out of the retaining grommet. (You have to do this to lift the fuel tank). There is a screw at the back of the tank (one of those hex fittings). After removal, ease out the bracket and then the rear of the tank can lift. There is one bolt to remove at front of tank.

Place something like a clean towel or bunch of rags and with two people lift the tank very slowly.My tank was about half full of fuel and my friend stood on left hand side of tank and tipped the tank towards him and tested it against towels (to avoid damaging paint). While your friend does this you can stand on right hand side and look under to ensure no wiring or hoses; etc. are under tension or there is risk of stretching. I’ve attached pictures of the connectors disconnected before I taped them with the tape. It is easy to check that you have the right connector by following the wiring back to the Lambda sensor.
As your friend places the tank back, just ensure the wiring loom and the fuel breather tubes do not get pinched. I slowly pushed them back down at front of bike and then just ensure I also pulled them back down a bit underneath the bike.

CAUTION. I found the ‘O’ shaped rubber grommets where fairing section popped in or out had a tendency to fall out so just check they are in place before mounting the fairing. I actually didn’t realise one of these fell outfrom the under seat side panel...and found it on the floor at end! Spent an hour working out where it had come from. Removed the fairing Sunday morning and couldn’t see one missing. Fortunately I checked the side panel and found it.

I hope this is helpful to those of you running a Termignoni T800 UpMap. UpMap also confirmed that my Competition Werkes GP exhaust is compatible with the T800 mapping.

In summary I would recommend you consider doing the above. The results are well worth it. I have also found the quick shifter seems to work better at slower road speeds (but I need to do some more road riding to be sure).
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@Sprint1500 Thanks a lot for sharing this valuable information.

Do you also have the Termi UpMap installed? Do you feel on a cold start the the engine non-responsive feeling disappeared?
 

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@Bassem.nomany I have the UpMap T800 installed. The app looks like the attached image. This is the only reason I disconnected the Lambda sensors (because they recommend it). I’ll have to ride a few more times from cold start to assess if there is a non-responsive feeling. I had only ridden the bike about three times since I got it before carrying out the above.
 

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@Bassem.nomany I took the bike out tonight. About 20 degrees Celsius. Started then rode it straight away without allowing engine to warm-up. Definitely lacking a bit of power in first minute or so. I suspect fueling is not rich enough to compensate for cold engine. It’s not a deal breaker just something to be aware of until a bit of heat produced. Once warming-up and for rest of ride I found driveability much improved sub 4000rpm.
 

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@Bassem.nomany I took the bike out tonight. About 20 degrees Celsius. Started then rode it straight away without allowing engine to warm-up. Definitely lacking a bit of power in first minute or so. I suspect fueling is not rich enough to compensate for cold engine. It’s not a deal breaker just something to be aware of until a bit of heat produced. Once warming-up and for rest of ride I found driveability much improved sub 4000rpm.
@Sprint1500 Thanks a lot for your feedback.

Lacking power when it's cold is a bit annoying when I have to climb a ramp out of the garage, because engine can stall. but you are right, engine warms up fast and then it's quite awesome.
I have a friend with M1200S and Termi exhaust and UpMap, He also suffer the same behavior.

Next time I'm in service, I will have them disconnect the O2 cable, I don't have enough courage to tinker with lifting up the fuel tank.
 

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@Sprint1500 Thanks a lot for your feedback.

Lacking power when it's cold is a bit annoying when I have to climb a ramp out of the garage, because engine can stall. but you are right, engine warms up fast and then it's quite awesome.
I have a friend with M1200S and Termi exhaust and UpMap, He also suffer the same behavior.

Next time I'm in service, I will have them disconnect the O2 cable, I don't have enough courage to tinker with lifting up the fuel tank.
Totally get your concerns. It is a bit mind boggling but I couldn’t believe how easy it was. Just need a second person and a towel so they can rest/support the tank as it is rolled on its left hand side (towel protects the paintwork). Also if you try it, I recommend investing in some high quality automotive (underbody) insulating tape to wrap the connector ends.
 

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I followed the steps and suggested video @Sprint1500 posted. Was pretty simple, I removed the sensors completely and plugged the holes. In case anyone was wondering, standard 12mm o2 plugs work (I swiped mine off my triumph and just ordered a new set). The difference is immediately noticeable. It’s not going to blow your socks off or anything but previously my bike hated being cold or below 4K. Now, it just simply dislikes it. But it’s simple and free (unless you want to get plugs, which are cheap) so there’s no reason not to IMO.
Edit: 12mm o2 sensor, not 18mm. Don’t know what I was smoking
 

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I followed the steps and suggested video @Sprint1500 posted. Was pretty simple, I removed the sensors completely and plugged the holes. In case anyone was wondering, standard 18mm o2 plugs work (I swiped mine off my triumph and just ordered a new set). The difference is immediately noticeable. It’s not going to blow your socks off or anything but previously my bike hated being cold or below 4K. Now, it just simply dislikes it. But it’s simple and free (unless you want to get plugs, which are cheap) so there’s no reason not to IMO.
@ThatJabinGuy Glad to read it’s worked for you too. I think your explanation of the performance improvement is spot on.
 

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OK. Now, I'm sold. will work on getting this over weekend.
@Sprint1500 why did you need a towel? was the tank leaking when you left it up? or?
The pictures you posted had one of the O2 sensors, is that the front or the back header O2 sensor?
 
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