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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I know we have bits and pieces of this process amongst a couple threads on this forum, but this will put all the important info in one post with some very helpful tips. I do not take credit for everything as some of this info came from other members. If this existed I could have been prepared and done this in one go, instead I ended up running around trying to find special tools. So here it is...

Parts Required:
Ducati OEM Oil Filter (Part Number: 444.4.003.7A)
Copper Gasket 18x12.2x1.5 (Part Number: 85250421A)
Aluminum Gasket 28mmx22.5mmx1.0 (Part Number: 22032083A)
Gasket 32x38x1.5 (Part Number: 85250051A)
3.35L (0.88 gallons) 15W50 Oil (See page 306 of Owner's manual for requirements)

Tools Required:
5mm Hex Socket
12mm Hex Socket
14mm Hex Socket
17mm Hex Socket (IMPORTANT: MUST HAVE A MINIMUM INSERTABLE LENGTH OF APPROX. 1.75"/44mm)
Oil Filter Wrench
Plastic Pry Tool
Oil Pan
Lots of shop towel or rag
Nitrile Gloves (Optional)
Funnel (Optional)

Torque Specifications
Oil Drain Plug with Magnet: 20Nm (Min. 18 Nm - Max. 22 Nm)
Oil Drain Plug for Mesh Filter: 42 Nm (Min. 38 Nm - Max. 46 Nm)
Mesh Filter Bung: 42 Nm (Min. 38 Nm - Max. 46 Nm)
Plastic Mesh Filter: 10Nm (Min. 9 Nm - Max. 11 Nm)
Oil Filter 11 Nm (Min. 10 Nm - Max 12 Nm)

Procedure:

Step 1: Partially wrap exhaust with tinfoil where the main drain bung is if you'd like to prevent oil from getting on it. When you remove the main plug it will run down your exhaust. If you aren't worried about it, move on to the next step.

Step 2: Place drain pan under bike. Remove filler cap so the oil will flow nicely. Remove the oil drain plug for the mesh filter. This requires a 12mm hex socket. Remove the washer for the plug you've just removed. Mine was seriously stuck to the bottom of the engine and could not be removed by hand. I used a plastic pry tool to remove it as can be seen in the picture.

Step 3: Move your drain pan over and remove the main drain plug. This is the smaller one with the copper washer, it requires a 5mm hex socket. Let it completely drain. Clean the metal shavings off the magnetic plug. (Tip: You may have to put your bike on it's rear stand to fit the drain pan underneath. I did for mine)

Step 4: Remove the oil filter. There is a special tool out there for Ducati filters which would come in handy but is not necessary. I actually used a pipe wrench on mine which is not a common method but it was way overtightened. It took some force to get off and was squeaky as if the gasket was never lubed during it's install. More oil will drain out so make sure to have your pan underneath.

Step 5: Remove the bung for the mesh oil filter. This requires a 14mm hex socket. It may take a little force to crack open. Make sure you get the washer off as well. With this removed you can now remove the plastic mesh filter. It requires a 17mm hex socket with an insertable tip of approximately 1.75". Longer will obviously work but any shorter than this and you might not reach it.

Step 6: Clean the mesh filter. I've read of people using gasoline but I personally ran it under hot tap water and used my finger to get some of the stuck metal filings off. I then shook what water out that I could, dried it with a paper towel, and hit it with a hair dryer on low setting for a few minutes until I was sure it was completely dry. There was surprisingly a good amount of shavings and little pieces of metal. I think this is a very beneficial part of the oil change and will personally be checking and cleaning this each time I drain the oil.

Step 7: Reinstall mesh filter. Be careful, it's only plastic threads. I used a torque wrench and set it to 10Nm as per the recommended torque spec. Use common sense here, it's not much more than hand tight.

Step 8: Reinstall bung for mesh filter with new washer (85250051A) using a 14mm hex socket. Torque to 42Nm.

Step 8: Reinstall drain plug for mesh filter with new washer (22032083A) using a 12mm hex socket. Torque to 42Nm.

Step 9: Reinstall drain plug with copper washer (85250421A) using a 5mm hex socket. Torque to 20Nm.

Step 10: Lubricate gasket of new oil filter with your new clean oil. Thread on by hand so its snug plus a little extra. If you have the proper tool set it to 11Nm. It is definitely possible to over exceed this value if you're trying to twist it on as tight as possible by hand. Some people like to pre-fill the new filter with their clean oil before threading it on. I think this is a good idea but I don't think it's a necessary step.

Step 11: Pour your new oil in the bike. My personal preference is Motul 300V 15W50. Make sure to reinstall the fill cap before starting the engine or oil will splash everywhere.

Step 12: Start your engine up and let it idle for 20 seconds or so. Shut it off, place something under the kickstand so it's level, and let the oil settle. Depending if you prefilled the filter, you will see the level in the sightglass has dropped quite a bit. Fill it up so the level sits somewhere between the two markings on the side of the sightglass. Mine used just over 3L. Make sure to check it some point in the near future after a short ride. The level should be checked cold.
 

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Thanks for the DIY. Make sure you only hand titghten the mesh filter itself (last photo). Its plastic and its not going anywhere.
 

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2017 Ducati Supersport, 2015 Ducati Scrambler Classic, 1994 Ducati 907ie
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I have the Ducati oil filter wrench that I bought a few years ago - it's like a giant socket that fits over the bottom of the filter. I find it is fine for tightening the filter but tends to slip off the filter when trying to undo them if they are really tight. I have a number of other filter wrenches but if all else fails end up using a pipe wrench.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Thanks for the DIY. Make sure you only hand titghten the mesh filter itself (last photo). Its plastic and its not going anywhere.
10Nm worked fine, but like I mentioned in the procedure some people prefer to only hand tighten the filter. Use common sense on this one. If you have a good torque wrench that you trust 10Nm worked for me. If your torque wrench is cheap or possibly out of calibration maybe just go a smidge past hand tight.

I have a billet oil Filler cap (not plastic) is the oil filler cap 10nm or ?
This isn't a torque spec you will find listed as the oem part is obviously just plastic and put on hand tight. I've never heard of torquing fill caps. If you need to add oil on the road and you have it torqued on you might find yourself in a bad situation.

I have the Ducati oil filter wrench that I bought a few years ago - it's like a giant socket that fits over the bottom of the filter. I find it is fine for tightening the filter but tends to slip off the filter when trying to undo them if they are really tight. I have a number of other filter wrenches but if all else fails end up using a pipe wrench.
This is the one I ordered:

https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B00KNN7NSQ/ref=pe_3034960_236394800_TE_dp_1

76mm w/8 flutes. Haven't received it yet but it will be good for torquing the filter to the right value. I'll update next time I do oil with how it works for removal. If it slips the pipe wrench will come out again LOL
 

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A tip for those of us in the USA who cannot find a 17mm hex readily without waiting for the Amazon. Get a bolt with a head size of 17mm, and 2 nuts with a head size of 17mm and make your own.

Also, I found compressed air (and safety glasses) work nicely to clean the mesh.

At least we do not need to remove the exhaust like you do on a Scrambler!
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Superb work, Amos.
Are you saying that I am secretely the great Amos operating under a second user name?

A tip for those of us in the USA who cannot find a 17mm hex readily without waiting for the Amazon. Get a bolt with a head size of 17mm, and 2 nuts with a head size of 17mm and make your own.

Also, I found compressed air (and safety glasses) work nicely to clean the mesh.

At least we do not need to remove the exhaust like you do on a Scrambler!
That is a creative idea, I like it!

Compressed air is a good alternate way to clean the filter. I don't have a compressor at the moment so it wasn't an option for me.

Does the filter require removing the fairing?
Nope! 🙂
 

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Superb work, Amos.
Are you saying that I am secretely the great Amos operating under a second user name?
Oops!

That’s what I get for posting at 4:30 in the morning before I’ve had a coffee.

All credit due to you, Audi. You did a great job with the write up and you obviously passed Dean Amos’ test since he quickly recommended Lucky make it a sticky! That’s an A+ !
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Tools Required:
17mm Hex Socket (IMPORTANT: MUST HAVE A MINIMUM INSERTABLE LENGTH OF APPROX. 1.75"/44mm)

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I'm having a **** of a time finding that socket. Do you have a link to where you got yours or the brand?
I called a few local tool supply stores. Not sure where you're located and what stores are in your area but I got mine from Bolt Supply House. Acklands Grainger was also able to get it for me but Bolt Supply House had it in stock.

I think I seen one on Amazon when I looked but didn't want to wait for shipping. They should list the length in the description.

I think mine is made by Gray Tools. Lifetime warranty and cost me $28 CAD. There website should tell you where you can buy it if you can't find one somewhere else. It's a 1/2" drive 17mm hex socket.
 

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I think mine is made by Gray Tools. Lifetime warranty and cost me $28 CAD. There website should tell you where you can buy it if you can't find one somewhere else. It's a 1/2" drive 17mm hex socket.
Thanks for all your work on this. I've got the oil change next month and I need a new rear tire. Going with a angel gt. Going to do both on my own.
 

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I'm having a **** of a time finding that socket. Do you have a link to where you got yours or the brand?
Make your own.

Take your 17mm 6pt or 12pt socket to the hardware store where you can buy bolts and nuts.

Find the bolt that the head fits the tightest in the socket.

Grab 2 nuts

Tighten the nuts against each other with some loctite(or without if not handy)

Use bolt head to remove filter.

If I remember right, I actually used a Standard bolt, as it was tightest, and had to sand down the flats just a tad and then it fit absolutely perfectly, probably even tighter than the real tool. I also believe I used a wrench on the rearward nut to remove the filter and cover, then the socket to reinstall it.

Mine was super tight from the factory, I would say over tight.

I have a pretty good shop at home, so I can mod tools and such at will. I tried 3 places to buy this thing and could not find it on a Saturday. I may order one on the Amazon for future, but then again, this works fine.
 

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Make your own.

Take your 17mm 6pt or 12pt socket to the hardware store where you can buy bolts and nuts.

Find the bolt that the head fits the tightest in the socket.

Grab 2 nuts

Tighten the nuts against each other with some loctite(or without if not handy)

Use bolt head to remove filter.
Dang that's slick
 

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Step 10: Lubricate gasket of new oil filter with your new clean oil. Thread on by hand so its snug plus a little extra. If you have the proper tool set it to 11Nm. It is definitely possible to over exceed this value if you're trying to twist it on as tight as possible by hand.
Man, this is twice I have had to nearly destroy a filter trying to get it off. I'm not sure why the techs these days are cranking on the filter so much. Totally unnecessary with that fat rubber gasket.
 
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