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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey All,
I live in a Condo during the week and cannot plug in the battery. Is there a rule of thumb as for how long you can go without riding or having it plugged in?
Also, how much draw would it take? I'm looking at a stand alone battery generator like the photo below. It has 18,000 mAh high battery capacity which can charge a cell phone 15+ times. I could charge this unit once a week without being annoyed but wondered if anyone knows how much they require to stay strong.
 

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35 minutes. The bike, of course, can go much longer, but your soul begins to wither after 35 minutes without riding. ;)


Your battery generator is just about the same capacity as a good bike battery, so using it would just about double your ability to let it sit. A weekly charge (or good ride) is acceptable. I wouldn't go more than that as a habit; it isn't good for the bike in many ways. Modern bikes with more electronics do drain more battery with disuse; you'll want to keep an eye on that.


Not to mention that modern E10 gas starts to go bad in 2 or 3 weeks, unless you dose it with stabilizer. And E10 also adsorbs moisture from the air, which isn't good for your gas tank if you have a plastic one. (A PA6 nylon tank can be ruined this way. Newer bikes with an HDPE tank and tank covers are not as susceptible to this, but it still isn't good for them.) If you try to get in a decent ride -- at least an hour -- every week, and you mostly succeed, you should be OK.


PhilB
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
35 minutes. The bike, of course, can go much longer, but your soul begins to wither after 35 minutes without riding. ;)


Your battery generator is just about the same capacity as a good bike battery, so using it would just about double your ability to let it sit. A weekly charge (or good ride) is acceptable. I wouldn't go more than that as a habit; it isn't good for the bike in many ways. Modern bikes with more electronics do drain more battery with disuse; you'll want to keep an eye on that.


Not to mention that modern E10 gas starts to go bad in 2 or 3 weeks, unless you dose it with stabilizer. And E10 also adsorbs moisture from the air, which isn't good for your gas tank if you have a plastic one. (A PA6 nylon tank can be ruined this way. Newer bikes with an HDPE tank and tank covers are not as susceptible to this, but it still isn't good for them.) If you try to get in a decent ride -- at least an hour -- every week, and you mostly succeed, you should be OK.


PhilB
Phil,
Thank you for this! A ton of great info there. Ill be ordering one of these to ensure she stays strong. The fuel info is new to me too. I didn't know it turned so quickly. I have a Shell up here with 0 ethanol so Ill be ok there.

thanks again,
 

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Phil,
Thank you for this! A ton of great info there. Ill be ordering one of these to ensure she stays strong. The fuel info is new to me too. I didn't know it turned so quickly. I have a Shell up here with 0 ethanol so Ill be ok there.

thanks again,
Yes, ethanol-free gas will help a lot. But still, tires, gaskets and seals, belts, and other parts will last longer and work better if they are exercised frequently, and not allowed to sit and dry out too long.


PhilB
 

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Hey All,
I live in a Condo during the week and cannot plug in the battery. Is there a rule of thumb as for how long you can go without riding or having it plugged in?
Also, how much draw would it take? I'm looking at a stand alone battery generator like the photo below. It has 18,000 mAh high battery capacity which can charge a cell phone 15+ times. I could charge this unit once a week without being annoyed but wondered if anyone knows how much they require to stay strong.
There is no rule of thumb. Bikes fitted with alarms will run the battery down quicker and trackers much quicker.
The OEM battery is quoted as only 10aH so you would be nearly doubling the capacity of the battery.
I only charge the batteries on my bikes about once a month while they are not being used during the winter (no alarms no trackers). The bikes always start and batteries have lasted me more than five years. The one on my Multi was over seven years old when I sold the bike and still working well.
 
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Interesting Derek. You've not found any evidence to suggest that a properly connected tender causes any undue harm, have you? The reason is I have a friend who swears he has kept his on a tender and still ruined the battery. It's an ongoing debate between him and I.
 

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Most tenders show a green light when the battery is up to voltage. It is possible for the connector to the battery to develop a high resistance due to oxidation. The tender sees a voltage and thinks the battery is OK and the green light stays on but in reality it is doing nothing as no current is flowing. When you come to start the bike the battery hasn't got enough oomph to fire it up.
 

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I used to use an optimate many years ago, I'm convinced it killed a battery on a bike of mine. I now use a solar panel rigged up to a voltage regulator designed for charging batteries. Works a treat, it even supplies a current on cloudy days. The bike has been connected to it all winter.
 

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You’re in luck. I measured the exact parasitic drain of the Supersport.

It’s 0.22 mA. That’s very low for any motorcycle much less a modern one.

My battery manufacturer (Shorei) has a chart to calculate how long the battery will hold its charge at a particular drain.

Based on 0.22 of the Supersport, the Shorei battery is estimated not to need a charge for 12 months!

The stock battery may not last as long as a lithium; but based on the minimal drain from the SS, it should still hold its charge for a while. I’d think fully charging the battery once a month would be more than enough while the bike’s not being ridden.
 

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You’re in luck. I measured the exact parasitic drain of the Supersport.

It’s 0.22 mA. That’s very low for any motorcycle much less a modern one.

My battery manufacturer (Shorei) has a chart to calculate how long the battery will hold its charge at a particular drain.

Based on 0.22 of the Supersport, the Shorei battery is estimated not to need a charge for 12 months!

The stock battery may not last as long as a lithium; but based on the minimal drain from the SS, it should still hold its charge for a while. I’d think fully charging the battery once a month would be more than enough while the bike’s not being ridden.
Interesting analysis, thanks...
 

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I have a charger for each bike, during the winter I put them on charge for a few days when the green light comes on I will leave it a couple of days & then switch them off for 3 to 4 weeks & then put them back on again.
I have had the Honda [motobatt gel battery] on this winter laid-up routine for 4 years + & other previous bikes for longer than that & never had to buy a battery also never had an issue with starting.


my Ducati Scrambler seems to drain the battery quicker when stood than the other bikes.


some say you can leave them on a tender for long periods & it will not fry the battery, I was advised by a technician some time ago that its not a good idea to do that..
 

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I don't charge mine at all

You’re in luck. I measured the exact parasitic drain of the Supersport.

It’s 0.22 mA. That’s very low for any motorcycle much less a modern one.

My battery manufacturer (Shorei) has a chart to calculate how long the battery will hold its charge at a particular drain.

Based on 0.22 of the Supersport, the Shorei battery is estimated not to need a charge for 12 months!

The stock battery may not last as long as a lithium; but based on the minimal drain from the SS, it should still hold its charge for a while. I’d think fully charging the battery once a month would be more than enough while the bike’s not being ridden.
Yep, the Supersport was designed to have a very low drain on the battery. I commute to work on my bike every day, so don't have much of an issue with charging, but I have left my bike unused for four weeks while away on holiday and it started first time. The only time I've used my charger was when I accidentally left the LED park lights on. Even then it took 3 days to drain the battery.
 

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Yep, the Supersport was designed to have a very low drain on the battery. I commute to work on my bike every day, so don't have much of an issue with charging, but I have left my bike unused for four weeks while away on holiday and it started first time. The only time I've used my charger was when I accidentally left the LED park lights on. Even then it took 3 days to drain the battery.
I did the same once, accidentally left the LED park lights on when I was out at a restaurant. When I came back several hours later and saw I left them on, I thought, oh no, it’s never gonna start! But start right up it did.
 

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The only time I've used my charger was when I accidentally left the LED park lights on. Even then it took 3 days to drain the battery.
That’s comforting to know that leaving the parking lights on while at work won’t necessarily discharge the battery!

I put the key on PARK once but caught it just before I walked away.
 

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LEDs use VERY little power. I'm surprised it died in 72 hours. I would have almost expected a week before drained.
 

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The SS has 14 LEDs in the front parking light (DRL) rated at 0.8W each. That is 11.2W, although I'm not sure that all of these LEDs are lit in parking mode.
The tail light has 8 LEDs rated at 0.45W each. That is 3.6W
The number plate light has 3 LEDs rated at 0.67W each. That's another 2.01W
That makes a total of 16.81 watts being drawn while the parking lights are on. So assuming a nominal 12V when the engine isn't running, the current draw is 16.81W / 12V = 1.4 amps. If only 1/2 of the DRL LEDs are light in parking mode the current drawn would be down to 0.93A

With only a 10Ah battery I'm surprised it lasted as long as it did.
 

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The SS has 14 LEDs in the front parking light (DRL) rated at 0.8W each. That is 11.2W, although I'm not sure that all of these LEDs are lit in parking mode.
The tail light has 8 LEDs rated at 0.45W each. That is 3.6W
The number plate light has 3 LEDs rated at 0.67W each. That's another 2.01W
That makes a total of 16.81 watts being drawn while the parking lights are on. So assuming a nominal 12V when the engine isn't running, the current draw is 16.81W / 12V = 1.4 amps. If only 1/2 of the DRL LEDs are light in parking mode the current drawn would be down to 0.93A

With only a 10Ah battery I'm surprised it lasted as long as it did.
Thanks for completely countering my comment. I didn't do the math. Sorry.
 

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The SS has 14 LEDs in the front parking light (DRL) rated at 0.8W each. That is 11.2W, although I'm not sure that all of these LEDs are lit in parking mode.
The tail light has 8 LEDs rated at 0.45W each. That is 3.6W
The number plate light has 3 LEDs rated at 0.67W each. That's another 2.01W
That makes a total of 16.81 watts being drawn while the parking lights are on. So assuming a nominal 12V when the engine isn't running, the current draw is 16.81W / 12V = 1.4 amps. If only 1/2 of the DRL LEDs are light in parking mode the current drawn would be down to 0.93A

With only a 10Ah battery I'm surprised it lasted as long as it did.
Very helpful, thanks Derek.
 

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I use a tender after every ride...Harley, Triumph, Ducati...All in the garage, always on charge and never had a problem.

The Triumph is a 2014 Thruxton I bought used and I'm sure the battery would have died long ago if I had not kept it hooked up!
 
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