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Maybe you should try to understand my answer before you write anything.

1 I am not completely dissatisfied with the handling. The handling is good. But from my point of view not perfect and you can improve it. That's exactly what I do. 90% satisfied and 10% dissatisfied.

2 As I have written, my problem will not occur with bigger and heavier people. You wrote in another thread that you are 6.3 tall (192 cm) and about 215 to 218 pounds (about 100 kg) heavy. I am significantly smaller and lighter than you. Please understand that people are different and therefore everyone else may have problems.

3. do you already have the Comfort seat of the Supersport? Then you have already done a part of my planned modification. Then you sit higher than me and have a much bigger lever than me with your heavier body. Then it is no wonder that you are completely satisfied with the handling.

And one more thing: With the Ducati Supersport I intentionally bought a sporttourer. That means I want to ride it like a sporty touring bike. If I have to ride the Supersport like a real Superbike, then the Ducati Supersport is the most useless bike in the world. From my point of view, Ducati must develop the next supersport more towards Touring in order to increase the distance to the Panigale family. With my modifications I am already doing this with the current Supersport.
Maybe you should try to understand my answer before you write anything
yes I have tried to understand. My comment is simply that I disagree. Not with what you want to achieve but rather with the belief that the change in bars will result in better handling of the Supersport. I do think you may be more at ease with the wider bars as it is what you are used and therefore you may end up happier having them but my point is technically I don’t believe it would better the handling. I also don’t see that a heavier rider has any greater advantage over a lighter rider by distributing there weight to help the bike turn better if anything it can be worse by unbalancing the natural line of the bike and introducing the need for more bar input to correct the balance. Good luck with it mate. It’s your bike and I am sure you will get what your after in the end.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
I think the SS is just about the perfect compromise between handling and comfort. Despite the wide bars and narrow tires on the GS, I'll still take the agility of the SS any day of the week. The weight, soft suspension and upright riding position negate any advantage an Adventure Bike might have. I've never ridden an Adventure Bike that handles as well as its counterpart, GS vs RS, DL650 vs SV, V85TT vs V7iii. I do understand why riders like Avd Bikes, largely due to comfort and versatility but I can't agree that handling or agility is a virtue.

Now, if we want to compare the SS to a Panigale, although I haven't ridden one, I've ridden several full on sportbikes. I agree that on a twisty road I feel like I have more control and leverage with higher and wider bars, lightweight, compliant suspension on the SS.

Finally to ChuX point, perhaps bar risers would give you the extra leverage needed? I put them on my bike simply to get my gut over the gas tank (not terribly successful). I can't tell they impacted handling but they are marginally more comfortable so they might be of benefit to you.

You might check HSBK and see if they are still running a sale. (See my earlier post.)
Thank you for your input. But I don't think that bar riser will improve the handling. Bar riser are made for more comfort, because you have less weight on your wrists.

Wrong suspension settings may make the bike harder to bring up from full lean like Rhino said. Start with suspension settings for you and your riding style before worrying about changing the bike mechanically. I think you will find your bike transformed after your suspension tune.
Yeah, I think so, too. In any case, the chassis setup is also a point that I will take care of in spring. I have the feeling that the rebound of my fork is too soft and doesn't react to changes. For this I have an appointment at an Oehlins specialist workshop. No matter how I adjust the front fork, it always feels like a pogo spring.

I am 5'9 tall and 66 kgs in weight and believe my SSS handles beautifully! However, I can't claim that I ride it 100% as I'm not that confident in my own skill, nothing wrong with the bike though. Having said that if you feel that YOUR experiments with YOUR bike might help you even feel better on it, I'd say go for it man and please let us know if you think the changes helped. We all ride our bikes for the feeling they give us, so it's important how you feel about yours.

Also, whenever I make a smallest change to my bike, it makes it that much more mine and different from all other SSSs out there 🙂 to misquote the US Marine Creed, "This is my bike. There are many like it, but this one is mine." 🙂
Thank you for your words. I will definitely report on my modifications and results so that others can benefit. Maybe others will feel the same problem sooner or later. I have been riding motorcycles for 20 years and have always moved my other motorcycles very quickly and with maximum lean angles. The problem I have with the machine only occurs at maximum lean angles. Until then the handling is very good.

yes I have tried to understand. My comment is simply that I disagree. Not with what you want to achieve but rather with the belief that the change in bars will result in better handling of the Supersport. I do think you may be more at ease with the wider bars as it is what you are used and therefore you may end up happier having them but my point is technically I don’t believe it would better the handling. I also don’t see that a heavier rider has any greater advantage over a lighter rider by distributing there weight to help the bike turn better if anything it can be worse by unbalancing the natural line of the bike and introducing the need for more bar input to correct the balance. Good luck with it mate. It’s your bike and I am sure you will get what your after in the end.
Sorry, but I know I'm right. Why? Because it's simple physics. Physics is always the same. No matter which bike you ride. When cornering / handling everything revolves around lever forces and when I increase the efficiency of lever forces, the handling improves. Another option would be to reduce the rotating masses (lighter rims), but this would be the last option as it is the most expensive option.
 

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Discussion Starter #23 (Edited)
Comparison Comfortseat with Standardseat:


Due to the Comfort bench seat the knee angle is slightly increased and my upper body moves forward slightly. Position of camera and motorcycle are unchanged. In a direct comparison the subjective impression is much higher than the pictures might suggest.

I expect two things from this:
1. higher leverage of my body when shifting weight due to the higher bench seat
2. a larger front wheel orientation


Comfort-Seat with cover:


As you can see a mounting of the seat cover is possible without problems.

Comparison 2 degree and 10 degree ducabike handlebars:


The 10 degree handlebar is longer than the 2 degree handlebar and the 2 degree handlebar is as long as the standard handlebar.

Standard from rider perspective:


2 degrees from rider perspective:


2 degrees from above:


10 degrees from rider perspective:


10 degrees from above:

From my point of view there is no big difference between the 2 degree and the standard handlebar. Therefore I will keep the 10 degree handlebar. The picture shows the position with maximum forward orientation (+ 4cm). But you can also choose a compromise between front and top (e.g. +2 cm upwards and +2 cm forwards).

Therefore I expect a modification with more leverage over the handlebars and a better handling.
 

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ChuX- I think I missed the point and see my remarks weren't relevant. I confused your complaints with another poster that had was comparing the SS with an Adventure/Dual Purpose bike. I see that you're riding at max lean and have issues with riding position and setting up Ohlins suspension. You appear to be a much more advanced rider than me, I am a street rider and don't explore riding at the ultimate limit.

Hopefully after you set up the suspension to your liking and make all the adjustments with the bars and seats, you'll find the "sweet spot".
 

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Discussion Starter #25 (Edited)
I changed my handlebars over the weekend and it was a bit more difficult than I thought. You have to drill several holes in the handlebars to get the instruments to fit properly. These have small nipples in different places. With the help of a caliper I transferred the holes from the original handlebars to the Ducabike handlebars. That went quite well. Second problem was that the holes were not exactly 5mm or 6mm wide, but 5.2 and 5.6mm.



This also leads to the fact that you can adjust the Ducabike handlebar stubs only once. You can't simply turn them into another position after mounting. For this you would have to drill all holes again and I don't know how many holes the material can take. I have chosen a position that makes the handlebars appear as wide as possible.

After a short test ride I have to say that it feels very good. I think this is a step in the right direction. Also, the handlebars now look more like a sport tourer like the Kawasaki 1000 SX.



I also thought again about the handling. It may be that I have lost a lot of handling by changing from a sport tyre to a tour sport tyre (Angel GT2). Touring sport tyres are not as sharply shaped as sport tyres and therefore rather flatter. This leads to a higher laziness when turning into the curve. In combination with the stub handlebars, I can well imagine that this leads to heavier handling when it comes to fast corner changes.

However, you should definitely be able to ride touring sport tyres on a sport touring bike. I'm changing to a Metzeler M7RR in May and I'll know more afterwards. In my opinion, a new Supersport should definitely have wider stub handlebars. Like on the Kawasaki 1000 SX.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Interesting. I am running Angel GT2s and noticed no difference in the handling, but a lot more grip...
Even if we leave the topic a bit, but are you satisfied with the GT2? I am not at all happy with the tyre. Apart from the worse handling, I don't get any feedback from the tyre about the grip level of the tyre. It does not give me any additional trust. On my R 1200 GS I had the Metzeler Roadtec 01 and the tyre gives the driver an incredible amount of trust.

But the handling in general must be worse compared to a sport tyre. This is due to the construction and is shown in every good tyre test. Touring sport tyres are less sharply shaped than sport tyres. All you have to do is look at the two pictures. The Angel GT 2 is flat in the middle. On the Rosso III you hardly see a flat spot in the middle. This makes the Rosso III turn a lot easier into the curve.

Whether you can feel this probably depends very much on where you live and which routes you ride. I only feel it when I ride a lot of fast corners in a row on tight roads.


 

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I'm not sure what your problem is exactly. I weigh about 70kg and am 1.7m tall on a good day. I have absolutely no problems getting it to corner whatever the road conditions, I think I could do with the handle bar raiser but leaning forward is more comfortable. In terms of getting it to flip into a corner I only ever had problems when I had been driving with cold and under inflated tyres. As soon as I corrected this all was as normal. I'm still running the Pirelli Rosso IIIs which have trouble getting up to temperature when the ambient temperature is 8 or below. I have never changed the suspension settings. My husband also rides this bike and he has never had any problems with cornering, in fact he says it throws around really easily and he uses same suspension settings as me. He thinks the Pirellis are easier to turn compared to say a Michelin which he has on his bike which is more of a wet weather tyre.
 

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Another fan of Angel GT2s here. Scratching or touring, a good all round tyre ,better in the wet and turn in unchanged IMO. The Rosso 111s wear a lot faster so they flatten off quicker which is why they get replaced. Turn in therefore is more predictable for longer.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
I'm not sure what your problem is exactly. I weigh about 70kg and am 1.7m tall on a good day. I have absolutely no problems getting it to corner whatever the road conditions, I think I could do with the handle bar raiser but leaning forward is more comfortable. In terms of getting it to flip into a corner I only ever had problems when I had been driving with cold and under inflated tyres. As soon as I corrected this all was as normal. I'm still running the Pirelli Rosso IIIs which have trouble getting up to temperature when the ambient temperature is 8 or below. I have never changed the suspension settings. My husband also rides this bike and he has never had any problems with cornering, in fact he says it throws around really easily and he uses same suspension settings as me. He thinks the Pirellis are easier to turn compared to say a Michelin which he has on his bike which is more of a wet weather tyre.
Thanks for your feedback.

I don't have any problem steering into a curve. The handling of the machine is only a bit lazy when changing direction quickly (left, right, left etc.) and only in high lean angles (> 45°).

Maybe this is mainly due to the tyre change from Diablo Rosso III to the Angel GT 2. A sport touring tyre is simply a bit lazier than a sport tyre when it comes to fast directional changes. In my opinion, the leverage is too low with the Supersport's stub handlebars for a sport touring tyre . Therefore I changed to the Ducabike stub handlebars. I also bought the higher comfort seat to increase the leverage of my body weight.

In May I will switch back to sport tires (Metzeler M7RR). Probably I will have an easy handling in combination with Ducabike stub handlebars and comfort seat.

That my problem could be at the suspension, was not my idea, but input of the other users here in the forum. Nevertheless, I will have the suspension adjusted or checked, because the bike reacts very nervously during light braking maneuvers in leaning position on the front axle. In my opinion too nervous. Furthermore I had the impression that the rebound of my front fork does not react at all to other settings. But this is a completely different problem and has actually nothing to do with the topic here. For this I have an appointment on 12.03.2020 at an Oehlins Servicepoint.
 

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... For this I have an appointment on 12.03.2020 at an Oehlins Servicepoint.
Let us know what sort of adjustments they make.

It could well be they sort out some of your problems - now I have mine pretty well dialled in I can feel the difference if I adjust any damping setting more than a click or so each way. Most noticeable is if rear compression is too fast the bike runs wide on exiting low-speed corners.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Yesterday I did the first small test lap (about 150 km), but due to the cold temperatures (about 8 degrees Celsius / 46.4 °F), I didn't want to ride high lean angles. But my first impression is fantastic. The handling has improved substantially. Fine line corrections in lean angle are now possible without any effort. It seems that you have 100% control of the bike at every second and can adjust the line at any time.

But now I sit a bit more towards the front wheel. It might be a good idea to buy not only the 10° Ducabike handlebars but also the spacers to get back the original sitting position.
 
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