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I know the heat shield is discussed in another post, but I thought I'd start afresh so hopefully everyone sees this.

On the weekend I went for a ride with a friend of mine - we both have Supersport S's. He has had the recall heat shield fitted and I haven't. We rode for about 400kms with plenty of breaks. Each time we stopped, we checked the rear shocks and his shock was hotter than mine every time!! Using your hands obviously isn't an exact science, but it was clear to both of us that his shock was always hotter to touch.

I've noticed that my shock isn't very hot when I first get off and check it, but it heats up quickly once the bike is stopped. (obviously this would occur in traffic too) Therefore, sometimes I'd get off and check my shock first and then his and other times visa versa. Either way, we checked over and over and got the same result. There was only one occasion when I thought the temps felt similar.

We even checked the bikes engine temperatures at times to make sure his bike wasn't running hotter than mine. Twice the temps were exactly the same. On another stop, I checked after the bikes had been switched off for about a minute and mine was at 73c and his 77, so no major difference there.

Regarding weights and settings etc, he's about 20 kgs lighter than me and his suspension is set softer. Mine is still on the original settings. My bike has done about 2100kms, his is at around 3800kms.

In my opinion the issue is this - the heat shield reaches temperatures similar to the exhaust, but the shield is closer to the shock and therefore radiates more heat.

My local dealer has ordered a heat shield for me but there's no way I'll be getting it fitted!! It doesn't work!!
 

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I know the heat shield is discussed in another post, but I thought I'd start afresh so hopefully everyone sees this.

On the weekend I went for a ride with a friend of mine - we both have Supersport S's. He has had the recall heat shield fitted and I haven't. We rode for about 400kms with plenty of breaks. Each time we stopped, we checked the rear shocks and his shock was hotter than mine every time!! Using your hands obviously isn't an exact science, but it was clear to both of us that his shock was always hotter to touch.

I've noticed that my shock isn't very hot when I first get off and check it, but it heats up quickly once the bike is stopped. (obviously this would occur in traffic too) Therefore, sometimes I'd get off and check my shock first and then his and other times visa versa. Either way, we checked over and over and got the same result. There was only one occasion when I thought the temps felt similar.

We even checked the bikes engine temperatures at times to make sure his bike wasn't running hotter than mine. Twice the temps were exactly the same. On another stop, I checked after the bikes had been switched off for about a minute and mine was at 73c and his 77, so no major difference there.

Regarding weights and settings etc, he's about 20 kgs lighter than me and his suspension is set softer. Mine is still on the original settings. My bike has done about 2100kms, his is at around 3800kms.

In my opinion the issue is this - the heat shield reaches temperatures similar to the exhaust, but the shield is closer to the shock and therefore radiates more heat.

My local dealer has ordered a heat shield for me but there's no way I'll be getting it fitted!! It doesn't work!!
checked mine with infrared temp sensor at engine temp of 105c the pipe is 460c and the heat sheild about 260 but I have ceramic coated the pipe and wrapped the heat shields with zircotec ceramic coated aluminium then ceramic painted black for looks. btw its the akra exhaust. shock temp with the engine running between 76 - 98 depending on location. not looking forward to summer with a furnace between my legs.
 

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Interesting thread...we have a few members with infrared temp test equipment.

Has anyone done a stock shock setup temp sensor measure before and after shield installation? Or can anyone plan a future test?
 

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2017 Ducati Supersport, 2015 Ducati Scrambler Classic, 1994 Ducati 907ie
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I have an infrared thermometer so it is something to think about. It's just the hassle of removing the heatshield then fitting it back after that will probably put me off hurrying to do it. :eek:
 

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It sounds to me like the shield is preventing the shock from cooling off while in motion. Once stopped, the heat then radiates quickly to heat it up. My quick conclusion is that the shield will help when NOT moving, but hinder cooling when IN motion. To me, at least initially, I would prefer it to cool while riding. Yes, the shock will heat quickly when stopped or in traffic, but with the pipe cooling slowly once the bike is off, the heat will lessen quickly.

VERY INTERESTING!!
@Derek - I would love for you to experiment for us...if you can. Hopefully, the removal isn't too difficult. On the surface, it looks like two screws and you've removed it.

Following this thread closely...
 

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@Derek - I would love for you to experiment for us...if you can. Hopefully, the removal isn't too difficult. On the surface, it looks like two screws and you've removed it.
There is also the weather here to contend with at this time of year. Just now it is raining most days and in a few weeks we will have frosts and salt on the roads so I won't take the bike out. I'm currently working on a project bike for someone else but that should be finished this week then hopefully I'll have time.
 
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There is a thread here in the early days when the rear shock bump stop issue was first recognised. Cannot remember the chaps name but the guy from Hawaii tested the temperatures and posted the outcome.
 

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This may be hard to test in static environmental settings. As it’s possible the shielded shock could be on average hotter than the unshielded shock in various scenarios, but the shield may still lower the maximum shock heat...at the melting point.

So it will be hard to tell if it is hotter in all scenarios. Though it would still be interesting to measure some scenarios.

One other test, of course, is that of the real world. Have any bump stops melted yet with the shield?

It’s a little early since shield installations, but, Guys and Gals with shields, what are your observations?
 

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I called my dealer last friday and he told me that the schield is only avaliable for the standard (non S) model. Maybe that's only true for Germany. Can anyone confirm that?
 

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I called my dealer last friday and he told me that the schield is only avaliable for the standard (non S) model. Maybe that's only true for Germany. Can anyone confirm that?
My Supersport S is scheduled for a free heat shield next week. I called the dealer that i bought the bike at and told them i had heard about a potential service bulletin for a heat shield. they looked up my VIN and said that it was qualified for the service in their system. I'm located in the US by the way.

Also, there is at least one case of an Ohlins shock with a heat damaged bump stop. Someone posted a pic in the other thread, so you might want to push a little harder on the dealer if you want to get it installed.
 

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After reading the OP's account, I'm a little hesitant to get the cover, now. Winter is coming up here. I may wait until the spring to get it done. I would like to hear others accounts of real world heat issues, first.
 

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My dealer has a stack of rear shocks to be replaced for supersport owners. Both models.
Hmm. If the exhaust is cooking the shock, won't it cook the new replacement too? Doesn't seem like a solution. Or maybe they're just hoping to kick the can down the road until the warranty expires, as not all owners have time to pursue this issue.:wink2:

My SSS got the shield a few weeks ago. Shock still gets mighty hot. Can't keep finger on the spring when hot. I can't understand how this design made it through testing?:confused:
 

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Hmm. If the exhaust is cooking the shock, won't it cook the new replacement too? Doesn't seem like a solution. Or maybe they're just hoping to kick the can down the road until the warranty expires, as not all owners have time to pursue this issue.:wink2:

My SSS got the shield a few weeks ago. Shock still gets mighty hot. Can't keep finger on the spring when hot. I can't understand how this design made it through testing?:confused:
If the new heat shield doesn't stop the rear shock cooking, then they will have to come up with another solution. They can't just let the warranty run out and wash there hands of the problem. In the UK we have the sale of goods act to protect the consumer against this type of thing, I'm sure other country's have similar. I know the USA does, they managed to take on Porsche and win when they had the cylinders cracking with a class action law suit. I'm sure Ducati won't abandon us, the bad publicity wouldn't be good for them.
 

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I received these mails some time ago from Ohlins.

Operating temperature should be between 70 -150 °C depending on which bike at what it’s been used for.
The shocks can take a higher temperature but this will affect the damping charactaristics.
Some dampers sit very close to the exhaust for example and in these cases we set the damping according to the working temperature when we track and road test the bikes.

I hope this information helps.


Then I received this one.....

It should be fine with our shock, we have been making OEM shocks for S model Ducati’s for years and many of them sit close to the cylinders and exhausts. The shock itself can take up to 800 degrees before it starts melting, this is not good for the performance obviously but it won’t melt anyway.
If you have any issues, which I don’t think you will, but if you do then as it’s an OEM product you would have to go through your Ducati dealer who in turn will take up the issue with our OEM dept.

Med vänliga hälsningar/ Best regards,
 

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Hmm. If the exhaust is cooking the shock, won't it cook the new replacement too? Doesn't seem like a solution. Or maybe they're just hoping to kick the can down the road until the warranty expires, as not all owners have time to pursue this issue.:wink2:

My SSS got the shield a few weeks ago. Shock still gets mighty hot. Can't keep finger on the spring when hot. I can't understand how this design made it through testing?:confused:
They install the heat shield with the replacement rear shock...(?)
 

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They install the heat shield with the replacement rear shock...(?)
Not necessarily. If there is visible damage to the bump stop, then they are replacing. It's cheaper to replace the whole shock than to take it apart and replace just the stop. Without visible damage, they can be negotiated with, or so I've heard. YMMV.

Oh wait...you asked a question in a different order. To answer your question, yes. They would add the shield if they replaced the shock.
 

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Sorry for the confusion- I didn't ask a question. I was responding to lowflying's post "If the exhaust is cooking the shock, won't it cook the new replacement too? Doesn't seem like a solution."

I'm stating that my dealer is adding the heat shield at which time folks are getting a new ($950) rear shock under warranty.

The service manager said they have not replaced a rear shock on models proactively fitted with a heat shield, i.e. mine, a 2017 SSS fitted with a heat shield from the start.
 

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I received these mails some time ago from Ohlins.

Operating temperature should be between 70 -150 °C depending on which bike at what it’s been used for.
The shocks can take a higher temperature but this will affect the damping charactaristics.
Some dampers sit very close to the exhaust for example and in these cases we set the damping according to the working temperature when we track and road test the bikes.

I hope this information helps.


Then I received this one.....

It should be fine with our shock, we have been making OEM shocks for S model Ducati’s for years and many of them sit close to the cylinders and exhausts. The shock itself can take up to 800 degrees before it starts melting, this is not good for the performance obviously but it won’t melt anyway.
If you have any issues, which I don’t think you will, but if you do then as it’s an OEM product you would have to go through your Ducati dealer who in turn will take up the issue with our OEM dept.

Med vänliga hälsningar/ Best regards,
The shock won't melt. Ride more, worry less.
Yours Truly,
Ohlins

LOL

I think I'll take that advice.
 
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