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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

So my most recent bone-head move was to leave the key on my SSS in the "On" position all day yesterday. So...after leaving my office at the end of day and looking forward to a ride home, I was met with the sicking realization that the keys were not in my pocket and the sound of silence when I hit the starter switch.

My initial reaction was to contact our on-site maintenance guys as they will provide "jump starts". However, I quickly remembered that our batteries are buried deep down and behind the lower fairing making accessing the battery terminals next to impossible without tools. Even though I do have the little SAE plug on the left side of the engine for trickle charging, that cable (and presumably an inline fuse) won't take the amperage of a "jump start".

I considered trying to push start the bike (not knowing if that will work on a modern fuel injected bike), but quickly was reminded that the attached panniers would likely cause me to trip as I ran along side the bike and make for a heroic leap if I attempted to jump and straddle the bike after running up to speed. Of course I don't carry the orange keys to remove the panniers with me... Needless to say the idea of tripping and dropping my bike cooled me to that idea.

So, an Uber ride home was in my future. The next morning I brought to work a long extension cord, my Battery Tender, and rolled my bike to a nearby building that had an external electrical outlet.

I'm hoping over the course of the day the trickle charger will give me enough juice to get the Ducati started.

I really hate the design of the battery layout.......

Anyway, I thought I'd throw this story out there for "food for thought" and to see if I could have done something different. Yeah, besides not leaving the key in the ignition in the "On" position....:crying:
 

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Ugh,

So the Battery Tender has been running for about four hours now and has been blinking red the whole time. I believe that blinking red light indicates either there is something wrong with the connection or the battery. I'm pretty certain that the Batter Tender is good. Reasonably sure the dealer installed SAE connector is good as I've plugged my electric vest into it in the past and was kept toasty warm. That leaves me with hoping that the battery is so low that, that's causing the blinking red light, but I have my doubts. I'm fairly certain if the connection was good and the battery was taking a charge, the indicator light would be a solid red until the battery was fully charged (green), which might take 24 hours since it's a trickle charger.
 

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It appears that your battery is dead but you won't know until you hit the start button.

I've got 2 dongles on my bike. One is a 7 amp charging plug for the trickle charger and the other is a cigarette lighter plug that I can power my air compressor. I think I can get a jump from one of the portable jump boxes with cigarette insert plug.
 

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Maybe Derek can jump in, but my understanding is smart chargers, including a battery tender, won't work on a flat battery due to the smart chargers electronics not sensing the battery at the other end...

Could you find a couple of sturdy coworkers who can give you a push while you're sat on the bike?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
[QUOTE Could you find a couple of sturdy coworkers who can give you a push while you're sat on the bike?[/QUOTE]

Possibly, but is it possible to push start a fuel injected motorcycle? Do the injectors need some minimum current that a dead battery won't be able to supply?
 

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Maybe Derek can jump in, but my understanding is smart chargers, including a battery tender, won't work on a flat battery due to the smart chargers electronics not sensing the battery at the other end...
Different bike and battery but I just had to send a tender down to my offspring, who just happens to be holding my Triumph hostage, because he ran it dead with the stupid key setting that seems made to kill batteries. He charged it all night and it started the next day.
 

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Maybe Derek can jump in, but my understanding is smart chargers, including a battery tender, won't work on a flat battery due to the smart chargers electronics not sensing the battery at the other end...
This is correct. Most 'smart' chargers need to see a minimum voltage to recognise that a battery is connected before they will switch to charge mode. The trick is to temporarily connect a charged battery across the terminals of the flat battery. This trucks the charger into charging mode and you then disconnect the other battery and leave it to get on with charging the flat one.
With regard to push starting; if the battery is as flat as the smart charger won't charge it then the likelihood is that it is too flat to power the fuel pump in which case you are wasting the effort.
 

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[QUOTE Could you find a couple of sturdy coworkers who can give you a push while you're sat on the bike?
Possibly, but is it possible to push start a fuel injected motorcycle? Do the injectors need some minimum current that a dead battery won't be able to supply?[/QUOTE]

you can push start the SS I have had to do it twice so far. there is a knack to it though. It must be in 1st not second and you must make sure you prime the compression. (what I mean is once its in 1st make sure you push the bike backwards till your at the start of the stroke) then you can push and clutch it with a totally flat battery. it only takes a couple of metres.
 

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This is correct. Most 'smart' chargers need to see a minimum voltage to recognise that a battery is connected before they will switch to charge mode. The trick is to temporarily connect a charged battery across the terminals of the flat battery. This trucks the charger into charging mode and you then disconnect the other battery and leave it to get on with charging the flat one.
With regard to push starting; if the battery is as flat as the smart charger won't charge it then the likelihood is that it is too flat to power the fuel pump in which case you are wasting the effort.

I’ve had positive results with this also.
 

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how would one know what position the piston is in.....???
Just roll the bike backwards while in gear until it hits a “stop”. Means you’ve pushed the crank as far back as possible so it has a almost a full turn to initiate ignition where the engine turns freely. You need to redo it between each attempt, or the piston will just lock the engine and backwheel immediately.

Good to know that the SS will start with a bad battery, never would’ve guessed. I’ve only tried the above with carburettor bikes.
 

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This is correct. Most 'smart' chargers need to see a minimum voltage to recognise that a battery is connected before they will switch to charge mode. The trick is to temporarily connect a charged battery across the terminals of the flat battery. This trucks the charger into charging mode and you then disconnect the other battery and leave it to get on with charging the flat one.
With regard to push starting; if the battery is as flat as the smart charger won't charge it then the likelihood is that it is too flat to power the fuel pump in which case you are wasting the effort.
Charging with a “dumb” charger also accomplishes the same thing.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Charging with a “dumb” charger also accomplishes the same thing.
So, that's what I'm trying now. I've an old school 10/2 Amp battery charger and rigged an alligator-SAE-adapter (a lot of electrical tape...). Just hooked it up 20 minutes ago. I'll run it at 2 Amps for most of the day and check on it later.

If this doesn't work, I"ll try the advice about positioning and try to push start the bike. I've removed the panniers so that is at least doable now.

The way this saga is going, I'm mentally preparing myself for the task of removing the fairing and replacing the battery.

Wow, this has been a complete cluster-muck for a simple drained/dead battery.

To complicate things even more, I work at a secured facility, so even if I wanted to have a tow truck brought in and tow it to the Ducati dealership in town, it would be a very involved exercise in bureaucracy.
 

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drain after leaving it on will affect any bike but other than that i think the stock battery is pretty good. I had my bike stowed away for 2 months and it started fine when i got back to her.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
drain after leaving it on will affect any bike but other than that i think the stock battery is pretty good. I had my bike stowed away for 2 months and it started fine when i got back to her.
You may have missed to point of my frustration. Understood that draining the battery on a motorcycle will cause a problem. However, this is first bike I've owned where due to the location of the battery and/or smart circuitry that takes a common task ( charging the battery or getting a jump ) and makes it fairly complicated.

Every other bike I've had, you could easily replace the battery and jump it simply by removing the seat or possibly a side cover. My bone-head move of leaving the ignition on would have been resolved on my previous bike by getting a quick jump from a friendly car driver ( or going home and returning in my car with jumper cables) in 10 minutes. I've now been dorking with this situation for a day-and-a-half now.

Don't get me wrong, I love the bike, but I really don't like the some of the engineering choices.
 

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You may have missed to point of my frustration. Understood that draining the battery on a motorcycle will cause a problem. However, this is first bike I've owned where due to the location of the battery and/or smart circuitry that takes a common task ( charging the battery or getting a jump ) and makes it fairly complicated.

Every other bike I've had, you could easily replace the battery and jump it simply by removing the seat or possibly a side cover. My bone-head move of leaving the ignition on would have been resolved on my previous bike by getting a quick jump from a friendly car driver ( or going home and returning in my car with jumper cables) in 10 minutes. I've now been dorking with this situation for a day-and-a-half now.

Don't get me wrong, I love the bike, but I really don't like the some of the engineering choices.
I must say I like many of the design and engineering choices they’ve made on the SS, like all the thought that went into hiding the fairing screws. However, easy serviceability certainly isn’t one of those decisions...
 

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You may have missed to point of my frustration. Understood that draining the battery on a motorcycle will cause a problem. However, this is first bike I've owned where due to the location of the battery and/or smart circuitry that takes a common task ( charging the battery or getting a jump ) and makes it fairly complicated.

Every other bike I've had, you could easily replace the battery and jump it simply by removing the seat or possibly a side cover. My bone-head move of leaving the ignition on would have been resolved on my previous bike by getting a quick jump from a friendly car driver ( or going home and returning in my car with jumper cables) in 10 minutes. I've now been dorking with this situation for a day-and-a-half now.

Don't get me wrong, I love the bike, but I really don't like the some of the engineering choices.
You might consider installing a "dongle" to the battery that will allow a jump, just as you have one for trickle charger. Of course, when you have an opportunity or when you install a new battery.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I give up, I give up!

Placing the old-school (non trickle ) charger on the battery netted me zero collected electrons. Dead battery 2 pts. Me winner of a big ol' goose egg.

I considered removing the fairing at my workplace parking lot and attempting to replace the battery. However, as I pondered the thought under the 90 degree clear skies I suspected that there was a possibility of removing the fairing and replacing the battery only to find that the bike still wouldn't start. That thought and me screaming in the wind in vain with a red sunburn over every exposed inch of skin made me consider alternatives. That's how my luck has been running the last two days and so my next call was on the phone to ask for a tow to the local Ducati dealership in town.

The SuperSport should get picked up tomorrow morning and I'll let the dealership deal with it. The dealership stated the Ducati Road-Side Assistance program would reimburse me for the tow, so that will be nice if it actually materializes.

I'll report back whatever the case may be; simply a dead battery or something else. If a dead battery "why" it wouldn't accept a charge; smart circuitry in the battery, blown fuse in the SAE line to the battery, whatever.

Thanks for all the suggestions for those who replied and simply for having a venue to air my frustration. Still love the bike, still hate the lack of maintenance consideration.
 

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In some bizarre twist of logic, I’m sure all the Harley guys at work are going to work assiduously to convince you of the superiority of a cruiser.

I feel your predicament, Missile.
 
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