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Hey guys and gals, 46m from NY and im thinking of picking up a supersport. Its between ss, t120bonnie, monster. I have always loved this bike, im looking for something fun, not to worried about crazy top end speed, something i can ride all day with out breaking my back.

I ride an R3 on the track, enjoy german sports cars.

S vs non S, pros cons, thinking 2020 unless i find a 19 left over.

Thanks for having me

AC
 

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Hey guys and gals, 46m from NY and im thinking of picking up a supersport. Its between ss, t120bonnie, monster. I have always loved this bike, im looking for something fun, not to worried about crazy top end speed, something i can ride all day with out breaking my back.

I ride an R3 on the track, enjoy german sports cars.

S vs non S, pros cons, thinking 2020 unless i find a 19 left over.

Thanks for having me

AC
I too was looking at the SS and Bonnie Thruxton with the half fairing. I like a degree of wind protection so the Monster was never on my radar.

Settled on the SS because the Thruxton is carrying weight to look like something it's actually better than ..... eg faux carb covers. The SS isn't trying to look like anything that it isn't. In 17k mls I haven't regretted the decision once. But both are great bikes, and I might well have been saying the same thing on the Triumph site if I'd gone the other way.
 

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Hey guys and gals, 46m from NY and im thinking of picking up a supersport. Its between ss, t120bonnie, monster. I have always loved this bike, im looking for something fun, not to worried about crazy top end speed, something i can ride all day with out breaking my back. I ride an R3 on the track, enjoy german sports cars. S vs non S, pros cons, thinking 2020 unless i find a 19 left over. AC
If you've always loved the look of the supersports bikes but didn't like the discomfort experienced when riding them, the SS might be your bike. It's such a great bike for the street, with a sporty but not uncomfortable riding position, a great seat, a wonderful quick shifter and plenty of mid-range torque. It's one of those machines which has all the attributes in harmony (looks/engine/chassis/brakes) rather than focusing on just one element. I owned a Monster 1200 before, but didn't like the lack of wind protection.

For me the S versus non-S model decision was easy - the Ohlins suspension and quick shifter were worth every penny (I had owned a 748R with Ohlins and an MV F3 with a quick shifter previously) - the seat cowl was just an added bonus. What I would suggest is to buy a past model year bike, as there have been no mechanical changes since the 2017 model introduction (mine was a low-mileage 2017 bought this past Spring). OBTW, my car is a 2017 VW GTI, so I understand the attraction of German machines as well.
 

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I think the standard model is the way to go. I couldn't justify the cost and maintenance of the Ohlins nor the reliability issue with DQS (but I personally enjoy shifting and throttle matching).

The negative with these bikes are buzzy mirrors and abrupt grabby clutch when the engine is cold.

So far as handling and control, it's in another category. It's light, torque-y, turns on a dime. Also can get factory bag package. The most comfy bike I own and have done several 400 miles days on it for the 8 months and 9k miles that I've owned it.

The only modification is to go with smaller countershaft sprocket (14T) (-1).

I don't see a direct comparison to the other two bikes for reason Keith mentioned.

There are lots of leftover bikes out there for good prices. A fellow rider in Vermont mentioned a great deal in the area, so you might check around. I'd recommend that if you purchase one, have the dealer install the 14T sprocket and set the suspension sag when you sit on the bike before you leave with it (especially the later if you get the S model).
 

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I think the standard model is the way to go. I couldn't justify the cost and maintenance of the Ohlins nor the reliability issue with DQS (but I personally enjoy shifting and throttle matching).
Cost is always an issue for buyers, but the ability of the Ohlins suspension to both soak up poor road conditions and yet be fully adjustable for track duty makes them worth the money to me. On the quick shifter, I only use the clutch for first gear take-offs, then leave the clutch alone on upshifts. I'm still experimenting with it on downshifts. It's one of those things that once you have it, you'll not want to go back.
 

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I think the standard model is the way to go. I couldn't justify the cost and maintenance of the Ohlins nor the reliability issue with DQS (but I personally enjoy shifting and throttle matching).
Wow. You just take every possible opportunity to trash Ohlins don't you?

I've had my S bike with Ohlins since June of 2017 and have had $0 maintenance costs associated with the suspension so far. I only had one issue with the quick shifter, and it wasn't actually quickshifter issue, it was the gear select return spring that needed to be replaced, which is the same part number on any of the bikes.

The reality is that the Ohlins bikes are $1500 more than the stock bikes. However, buying the Ohlins suspension and retrofitting it is actually more expensive on a component cost basis. IIRC, the forks were $2200 and the shock was $1250. So - the S bike saved you over 50% of the cost of the upgrade, and got you a bonus free up/down quick shifter.
 

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Welcome to the forum, I have the non “S”, I think it’s a great bike. I’ve not ridden the S model so don’t know if I would prefer it for my riding.
Get a test ride on both if you can then decide for yourself.
 

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Hello and welcome!!!!

Tons of info on the forum already going over every question you have so feel free to search around a bit and see what others have said. Personally, I think the S is absolutely the way to go but it’s up to you to decide where your money is best spent.

There is nothing out there quite like this bike. Ride one, you’ll either love it and want it or you won’t and there are a ton of other great options out there. I rode mine just to discount it as an option and immediately realized this was the bike I’ve been wanting for years. Just finished up my first full year of ownership and I still day dream about riding it more than any other bike I’ve owned in 40+ years of riding motorcycles and owning over 35 different bikes.

That should say something.
 

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Missed the S vs non S. I have the S. Went to a dealer that had both to test. Tried the S first and didn't even bother taking the base model out. I'd never ridden with QS before, but loved it. And those Ohlins work great, and look SO sexy.

I keep my bikes for life. Pretty sure I'd have regretted not getting the S long after I'd stopped missing the dollars I saved.
 

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For me the Ohlins suspension on the S is a must! It happened a couple of times for me when in a bend I notice some rough surface but the suspension just eats them up, it's a great feeling that I can rely on the bike so much!

The quick shifter is also great, although it's my first. I use it mainly to downshift and engine break, although it might be bad for the engine, I really like using it like that and the sound the Akra slip ons make. It's super fun to up shift too!
 
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The only real difference between the standard and S is the Ohlins suspension. The seat cowl and quickshifter that are standard on the S can be optioned on the non-S.

No matter which suspension you opt for, get it set up properly. Sag can be set by anyone who knows what it is and can read a tape measure, but damping should be set by someone with a bit of understanding. Your local race shop is probably better than your dealer. Even so, any adjustment made properly will put you in a closer window of correct damping. Suspension should be serviced regularly, irrespective of what brand. 10,000 to 15,000 ks is considered ideal for hard street riding. It will cost approximately the same for Sachs/ Marzocchi as it will for Ohlins. If you look after your suspension it will be reliable.

If you have a heavier build you might need heavier springs to get the optimum sag numbers. Again, a race shop or suspension specialist is your friend.

I went for Ohlins. If I'm buying a bike for its handling ability the extra was a no brainer. The Ohlins gives a smooth ride, absorbs shock, keeps the tyres on the road, and doesn't fade. That's why they are used on race bikes. The Ohlins on the Supersport is not the same as used in MotoGP or WSB but it is good. I felt the SSS was just better than the SS, but I should go back and try a SS at some stage to see how different they feel now.

We were talking quickshifters over the weekend. Everyone in the group said the same thing (Ducatis, Triumphs and BMWs represented), the rider thought they were a gimmick when they bought the bike, but after having one wouldn't be without. I still use the clutch in town or cruising, but when the pace picks up it is brilliant.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for all the replies and insight into the bike. Ill do some more research and come back with any questions.
 

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Wow. You just take every possible opportunity to trash Ohlins don't you?

I've had my S bike with Ohlins since June of 2017 and have had $0 maintenance costs associated with the suspension so far. I only had one issue with the quick shifter, and it wasn't actually quickshifter issue, it was the gear select return spring that needed to be replaced, which is the same part number on any of the bikes.

The reality is that the Ohlins bikes are $1500 more than the stock bikes. However, buying the Ohlins suspension and retrofitting it is actually more expensive on a component cost basis. IIRC, the forks were $2200 and the shock was $1250. So - the S bike saved you over 50% of the cost of the upgrade, and got you a bonus free up/down quick shifter.
Every opportunity? My goodness, one sentence when asked about it? You protest too much.

If you want Ohlins, fine. Some of us don't think they're worth it. I stated my opinion without mentioning yours, you could do the same. I don't understand the insecurity of the S owners when this comes up. It seems those of us with standard suspension are happy with it, don't really fiddle with it much nor have to get it resprung like we hear from Ohlins owners.

Regardless, I suggest anyone purchasing a new bike have the sag/preload set by the dealer upon delivery.
 

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@LowRyter, how big an issue do you have with the clutch being grabby. For me, I'm careful coming up the ramp from my garage onto the driveway and that's about it. I pretty much assume that on the second application of the clutch, it will be normal. Admittedly I don't typically go straight into bumper to bumper traffic, just moderate urban conditions.

Is the 'grabby' clutch a bigger issue for you? Is it for other riders?
 

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@LowRyter, how big an issue do you have with the clutch being grabby. For me, I'm careful coming up the ramp from my garage onto the driveway and that's about it. I pretty much assume that on the second application of the clutch, it will be normal. Admittedly I don't typically go straight into bumper to bumper traffic, just moderate urban conditions.

Is the 'grabby' clutch a bigger issue for you? Is it for other riders?
Never had an issue with a grabby clutch on the SSS over 2 years of ownership, predictably progressive. I do warm up the bike for a couple of minutes before I ride though. 50 years of riding all sorts of bikes has indoctrinated me with a bad habit? Wet clutch engines need heat IMHO. My dry clutch track bike is more grabby even after a warm up.
 

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The odd thing is that both LowRyter and I have Guzzis with automotive style dry clutches which I suspect would give most riders a bit of difficulty until they acclimatised. I'm not sure just which Guzzi LR has but mine (a 1tb V7) definitely takes up at a different point and probably wants a longer warmup than the Ducati. But the different take up makes me clumsier (in shifting more than starting off) if I go straight from one to the other

I've heard complaints about the grabbiness of the clutch from others - not just LowRyter - it does seem to be an accepted 'issue' but I'm wondering if it becomes less of an issue over time
 

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AC,

As can be expected here in our SS community, you’re getting even-keeled advice from some of our reliable citizens who own the S bike.

Since this was my first sportbike and I bought it strictly for commuting to work on straight, flat roads, I forewent the Öhlins and purchased the base model. We have a few seasoned Scottish riders here whose opinions I always find insightful and helpful. One of them has the base model and, IIRC, felt the same way I did.....the base model is good ‘nuff.

Although I don’t think I’ve yet reached the limits of the potential settings on the Marzocchi and Sachs suspension, if I were to buy another SS, I’d probably fleet up to the S version. Better to have and not need than need and not have. Anyways, I don’t regret the base model because it gets me to work just fine and the bike handles twisties just fine. Any limitations right now have more to do with the rider (me) than the bike.

None of this is meant to discourage you from getting the S model but rather to share that the base model is pretty darn good.

I think the only drawback about owning the S version is the nagging complaints from LowRyter who stubbornly asserts his dislike for Öhlins suspension as if they were facts.

Everybody else seems to get along just fine with each others’ choice in suspension.
 

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I went with the base model. It still has name brand suspension parts on it. I'm not sure what my past Yamahas and Kawasakis had, but the base suspension on my Supersport is way better. I've done several long weekends ranging from 1500 to 2500 miles and everything was fine. I might add the seat cowl though.
 

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@LowRyter, how big an issue do you have with the clutch being grabby. For me, I'm careful coming up the ramp from my garage onto the driveway and that's about it. I pretty much assume that on the second application of the clutch, it will be normal. Admittedly I don't typically go straight into bumper to bumper traffic, just moderate urban conditions.

Is the 'grabby' clutch a bigger issue for you? Is it for other riders?
For my bike it isn't a big issue. I have the same experience as you describe. When the bike is cold, the clutch needs to cycled a couple of times. It's pretty easy to kill the bike. The clutch is fine after ridden a couple of blocks and cycling the clutch. However, even expecting it, I still might kill the bike once every 3 or 4 times. To me, it's more a quirk than a problem, now if it was constant, then it would be. BTW- I warm up the bike first but its seems to have little effect until I cycle the clutch the a couple of times.
 

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I went with the base model. It still has name brand suspension parts on it. I'm not sure what my past Yamahas and Kawasakis had, but the base suspension on my Supersport is way better. I've done several long weekends ranging from 1500 to 2500 miles and everything was fine. I might add the seat cowl though.
That matches my experience as well. This bike handles better than any bike I've ever ridden much less owned. There is something about Italian bikes that have a great feel and balance like I don't get from any other bike whether Japanese, German or Brit. That and the styling are the two reasons I put up with the quirks and maintenance. Although this bike is quirky, it hasn't required any unscheduled maintenance.

I have the same Marzocchi/Sachs combo on my Guzzi V11 Sport and after screwing with it and getting the shock rebuilt, have finally gotten it worked out and like it fine. The funny part is there was also and upgraded Sport/Lemans with Ohlins and it's a similar go around as we see here. It's much more polite on the Guzzi side because we're always working on these bikes and need each other to keep them going, fabricating parts, like windage trays, gearbox springs and transmission braces, and selling them to each other to defray the costs. Much more camaraderie and tolerance. Older and more mature crowd coupled with a few mechanical geniuses (not me).
 
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