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Review says the bikes were fitted with the touring screen option. In the picture it is obviously in the highest position. Does it offer enough wind protection for long all day high speed rides or extended day trips is something to consider if this is an important consideration ........... To me it looks doubtful.




P.S. I'm not trying to bag the bike, I'm trying to be completely open minded and objective as information becomes available.
 

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The other point in the review that caught my eye was the description of the suspension reportedly being set up too soft for the track. In another review I believe the word 'plush' was used to describe the ride. Plush is not how I want my bikes to be set up as it means excessive soft to me. In this review the author stated that under brakes "it dives a lot".

You'd have to ask why would a manufacturer deliberately set up the bike for a track day to be too soft, give a plush ride, and dive excessively under brakes. These comments lead to me question is the bike under sprung and dampened for the average weight journalist (being something typical of the average rider).

Anyhow, something else to evaluate for yourself on a test ride.
 

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Both models have adjustable suspension, but it isn't a Sportsbike it's for the road so I guess that it will be the soft side of firm.
Certainly roads in the UK are not comfortable on a race setting.

From a report I read the bikes used on the track were set softer than they would normally for the track because it was raining. So as the track dried out later in the session the result was too soft for a dry track.

Quote.....
It can do track, but that’s not its natural home, this is all about comfortable, practical road riding with plenty of sporting kicks thrown in. But we got to ride it on track anyway...

They do offer a touring screen, the bikes on test did not appear to be fitted with this option. But some used the 'higher' position.
 

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Exactly as I hoped. Nice work Ducati!!!

Looking forward to mine coming soon!
 

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They do offer a touring screen, the bikes on test did not appear to be fitted with this option. But some used the 'higher' position.
"Our track bikes had a higher touring screen fitted for extra wind protection, and an aftermarket Akrapovic titanium and carbon end can, but other than that, the wets (we’ll come to those), and a softer suspension set-up, the bikes are standard."
 

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I saw that, it doesn't look like the touring screen I saw a picture of. But that was some time ago so things change.
 

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Both models have adjustable suspension, but it isn't a Sportsbike it's for the road so I guess that it will be the soft side of firm.
Certainly roads in the UK are not comfortable on a race setting.

From a report I read the bikes used on the track were set softer than they would normally for the track because it was raining. So as the track dried out later in the session the result was too soft for a dry track.
I'm still very skeptical about the soft setting because it was raining line. Surely they would set up each bike to suit the intended riders. Say one jouro is a featherweight, and another is on the large and heavily built side. Why would any manufacturer wanting a good report ask them to ride an identically set up bike. At the very minimum they'd set the correct sag for the rider's weight. Would take skilled Ducati technicians about 30 seconds per/bike rider.

As you'd expect a small army of Ducati Technicians to be on hand during these important test, if someone felt the damping was not to their liking out on the track why wouldn't they just run back into the pits and ask for it to be taken up a couple clicks (10 seconds). Would Ducati say "no, I'm not going to do that for you, ride it how we gave to you or don't ride it at all?". Doubt it.

One jurno reported the bike dived badly under brakes. The main reason bikes dive uncontrollably under brakes is because the front springs are too light for the riders weight. No amount of twiddling with the preload will change the problem of underweight-springs. Preload only alters the bikes static ride height, has zero effect on spring rate.

I'm sticking to my current belief that there is a very good chance the bike is currently sprung and dampened lightly (that's exactly what I'd expect). A heavy rider can ride an under sprung bike, just find it mushy soft. A light rider will get their teeth knocked out on a bike sprung for someone heavier. So manufacturers virtually always under spring bikes. Not a problem that can't easily be rectified, but possibly just allow another $600 in your budget if you weight average or above to get the springs and valving done to suit your weight.
 

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Great insight on your part John, correlating that to what test riders will be saying will be interesting since there's going to be a lot coming in and from different markets, UK, USA, Canada, etc.
 

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Great insight on your part John, correlating that to what test riders will be saying will be interesting since there's going to be a lot coming in and from different markets, UK, USA, Canada, etc.
Thanks, I hope somebody gets something useful out of it, rather than just accepting the usual 'everything is wonderful' spin from the journos. Certainly don't claim I'm right, just points that I think important that in the reviews jumped out to me, and that as a prospective buyer I would focus on when I get a chance to ride it myself, and ask other owners about.

The problem for a lot of relatively inexperienced riders who will no doubt be attracted to this bike (any bike) is they don't know what they don't know. Gee I've thrown enough money away over the years learning by trial and error in activities I didn't know a lot about. Last major was purchasing a power boat. I wish there'd been some cynics around that I could have tapped into to tell me the glowing reports in the magazines were a load of crap and the boat would be a totally unsuitable for the intended purpose.

Anyhow, for me ... probably my last contribution as I've decided the bike probably isn't for me. I'll go check it out when it comes into the shops, and keep an eye on the forum to see how people like it. However, I wanted a bike suitable for all day long hard fast riding, and the occasional several days away at a time. Virtually every review has come back saying there is no 'touring' in this bike. The screen is woefully small when you see someone my size on it so that even rules it out for day riding as I get tired being blasted at 140 kph plus for much of the day. It would have less wind protection than my current naked with its modest size screen. No lean angle ABS yet a premium price, etc.

Bottom line, its clearly not big enough for me. Contrary to the reviews the SS does have a direct competitor. It's the Suzuki GSX-S1000F. The 2017 version is apparently going to have a slipper clutch so spec wise it will be virtually identical, even weigh just 4 kg difference. It's a bigger and more powerful bike, and in the red/black color scheme looks ok. So that's probably the direction I'll go.

For those who feel the SS is for them and buy one, thrust you get many years of enjoyment from the bike.

John
 

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Some of the reports I've read do say its suitable for occasional touring, particularly as Ducati doing some panniers, a tank bag and a tail pack. So it'll do foe me on my one European tour each year. Its almost identical a riding position as my R1200RS and that was more than fine for touring. Being vertically challenged and having sat on three supersports I would agree that it doesn't seem suitable for tall or large people.

I did consider the Suzuki but after looking at it several times I found it impossible to do either a one or two week tour on it. Whilst it'll take a tank bag it wont take a tail pack due to the sportsbike design of the pillion seat and rear end.
 

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I did consider the Suzuki but after looking at it several times I found it impossible to do either a one or two week tour on it. Whilst it'll take a tank bag it wont take a tail pack due to the sportsbike design of the pillion seat and rear end.
Ventura

 

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GSX in blue is an attractive bike, and you learn something new every day (tail pack) though I wonder how secure it is.
 

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GSX in blue is an attractive bike, and you learn something new every day (tail pack) though I wonder how secure it is.
Secure as in theft or coming off while riding? It slides down onto a frame which goes into a pocket at the back the full height of the bag. Never come off. Pull up where your staying for the night, undo two simple clips that ensure the bag doesn't ride up the frame over bumps (it wouldn't), slip the bag up of the frame, and carry it by the handle or optional shoulder strap to your room. To be 100% waterproof in heavy rain the optional rain cover needs to be used.

I have a Ventura bag (the largest they make) on my current ride and it is 100% solid. A big benefit of the system is for sole touring the bag is fitted so the weight sits on the pillion seat, rather than hanging way out the back like a hard box. The effect on the ride is just like you had a small child pillion sitting directly behind you.

With the largest bag in the range I only need to one bag to fit everything for a couple weeks away. And that includes basic repair tools, mini air compressor, front and back spare tubes (current bike has tubes), etc and all cloths and wet weather gear. Is it as neat when not using the bag, as a factory pannier system, no because there are the frame rails. However they are easily removed completely. I leave the frame on all the time and for day riding with what they call a sport bag (just big enough to carry wet weather gear, wallet, glasses, phone etc.).

Probably 80%? at a guess of riders who tour in Australia use a Ventura (or rip off) bag system. No doubt Ventura will have a system for the SS in the near future, I recommend their products.

P.S. The Ventura pannier bags are 24 liters each. I doubt the genuine Ducati SS bags will be significantly larger.
 

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Ducati claims 22 liters each for their bags, but they are designed specifically for the SS and look like it.
I agree they do look good. I'd really be sold if they'd just make the MTS hard-cases an option.

As far as the windscreen goes, I'm sure it won't be long before there are multiple aftermarket options to choose from...
 
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