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Other than using the factory standard settings for preload, compression and rebound F/R as per the manual, or a custom set up measuring sag per rider weight, etc, does anyone have a table of recommended settings by rider weight?
 

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The sag setting seems a little theoretical yet its practical. @Rhino has highlighted something I had not considered and that is the riders positioning and not only the riders weight. My weight is near the factory settings of 80kgs and never bothered playing with the preload for sag measurement.
The past few days I have been in the twisties of the lowveld region. I have always thought the suspension is too hard for the road conditions where I live. So I started at the factory setting of 16 clicks on the compression fork and softened it 2 clicks per day of riding, 4 clicks felt reasonable with less of my eyes rattling in their sockets, today I will be testing 6 clicks plus the 16 clicks factory setting on the front compression fork. Front rebound remains untouched. On the rear I am at 4 clicks softer and will try hardening it with 1 click clockwise. The rear I felt was a little bouncy, so today I test 3 clicks plus the factory's 6 clicks on the rear.
My point is that the road conditions vary and finding the optimum comfort takes a little effort albeit it is quite simple to do.
 

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The sag setting seems a little theoretical yet its practical. @Rhino has highlighted something I had not considered and that is the riders positioning and not only the riders weight. My weight is near the factory settings of 80kgs and never bothered playing with the preload for sag measurement.
The past few days I have been in the twisties of the lowveld region. I have always thought the suspension is too hard for the road conditions where I live. So I started at the factory setting of 16 clicks on the compression fork and softened it 2 clicks per day of riding, 4 clicks felt reasonable with less of my eyes rattling in their sockets, today I will be testing 6 clicks plus the 16 clicks factory setting on the front compression fork. Front rebound remains untouched. On the rear I am at 4 clicks softer and will try hardening it with 1 click clockwise. The rear I felt was a little bouncy, so today I test 3 clicks plus the factory's 6 clicks on the rear.
My point is that the road conditions vary and finding the optimum comfort takes a little effort albeit it is quite simple to do.

@amoslws
I am the same size/weight...curious to hear your findings. I felt that the back was too bouncey and the front too firm.
 

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@amoslws and @Hugg727 your impressions sounds about right I am 20kg heavier with correct SAG settings and if I was 20kg lighter I would expect the feel to be harder at factory settings. I have videoed my suspension rebound and compression movement and compared it with the movement on my last bike with as near perfect setup and I have found both rebound and compression are a touch too slow. I have a spread sheet that I set up years ago that helps me keep track of changes rather than a note book. I keep a fresh print out on the bike and make my adjustment (and impressions of the adjustments) then transfer it to the spread sheet later. I will be adapting 2 settings that I can dial in on the Go 1 for normal riding and another for aggressive cornering. I will post my info with adjustments and results. (hope to have a short 20sec video of the suspension action per adjustment for visual confirmation of travel, speed etc). Hopefully it will help people see the difference (better or worse ) on going each way . I have heard but not confirmed that some people have been adjusting compression several clicks with no noticeable difference ?
 

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@amoslws and @Hugg727 your impressions sounds about right I am 20kg heavier with correct SAG settings and if I was 20kg lighter I would expect the feel to be harder at factory settings. I have videoed my suspension rebound and compression movement and compared it with the movement on my last bike with as near perfect setup and I have found both rebound and compression are a touch too slow. I have a spread sheet that I set up years ago that helps me keep track of changes rather than a note book. I keep a fresh print out on the bike and make my adjustment (and impressions of the adjustments) then transfer it to the spread sheet later. I will be adapting 2 settings that I can dial in on the Go 1 for normal riding and another for aggressive cornering. I will post my info with adjustments and results. (hope to have a short 20sec video of the suspension action per adjustment for visual confirmation of travel, speed etc). Hopefully it will help people see the difference (better or worse ) on going each way . I have heard but not confirmed that some people have been adjusting compression several clicks with no noticeable difference ?
Good stuff! Looking forward to seeing your findings.
 

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@amoslws
I am the same size/weight...curious to hear your findings. I felt that the back was too bouncey and the front too firm.
Unfortunately where the twisties are in my country there are also sh!t loads of logger trucks, so at corner entry the roads are rippled and that is very exhausting when trying to get the right line, I have softened both front and back and I enjoy it so much more. Every bend has bumps where the trucks are braking for the turn and because of the ambient heat it starts to roll up the tar. It can be quite scary when the bike bounces 3 ft off the line, but softening them has really helped alot. I have a had five days in the mountains and it's been so much better since I adjusted the compression.
 

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Same video twice..nice video, though. Would love to spend a few minutes with this guy and have him set up mine, then go for a ride with him, then talk for a bit over a pint!! Cheers, mate.
 

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Same video twice..nice video, though. Would love to spend a few minutes with this guy and have him set up mine, then go for a ride with him, then talk for a bit over a pint!! Cheers, mate.
The first is see by pay, if I`m not wrong... There he sets the bike up...
D
 

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Same video twice..nice video, though. Would love to spend a few minutes with this guy and have him set up mine, then go for a ride with him, then talk for a bit over a pint!! Cheers, mate.
I imaging MotoGP technical crew would feel the same way. Takes them hours, even days of continuous testing, real time monitoring, and feedback from the worlds best riders to get their suspensions sorted.... just for one individual track. Imagine having a bloke on hand who could just bounce the bike a couple times and the jobs done. He's be able to do the who starting grid in about 30 minutes.

Definitely a 'suspension guru'.
 

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Unfortunately where the twisties are in my country there are also sh!t loads of logger trucks, so at corner entry the roads are rippled and that is very exhausting when trying to get the right line, I have softened both front and back and I enjoy it so much more. Every bend has bumps where the trucks are braking for the turn and because of the ambient heat it starts to roll up the tar. It can be quite scary when the bike bounces 3 ft off the line, but softening them has really helped alot. I have a had five days in the mountains and it's been so much better since I adjusted the compression.
I will be softening up the front as well this weekend. I have a few roads up in the mountains that give a lot of "chatter" in the turns. I slow my pace way down on this one road. Hoping the new settings will inspire a little more confidence.

Thanks:grin2:
 

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I will be softening up the front as well this weekend. I have a few roads up in the mountains that give a lot of "chatter" in the turns. I slow my pace way down on this one road. Hoping the new settings will inspire a little more confidence.

Thanks:grin2:
On ohlins, the left fork is compression, the factory settings are 16 clicks, best to do it in a quiet room because they are hard to hear and feel using an allen key. My final setting is four clicks anti clockwise on the rear wheel, I played at 2, 3 and 4 clicks and ended up with 4 plus the factory setting of 6 - 10 clicks anti clockwise. Final setting on the front is 6 clicks plus the factory setting of 16 (tested it by dialing back to zero) - 22 clicks from zero. Front fork has total of 28 clicks from maximum to zero compression on the dial. Turn anti clockwise to soften the compression.

Not sure you recall but i moaned about my eye balls rattling in the sockets from 200km/hr, with the new setting it has reduced it, it's still there but not as bad. Hey I can see the road again.
 

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On ohlins, the left fork is compression, the factory settings are 16 clicks, best to do it in a quiet room because they are hard to hear and feel using an allen key. My final setting is four clicks anti clockwise on the rear wheel, I played at 2, 3 and 4 clicks and ended up with 4 plus the factory setting of 6 - 10 clicks anti clockwise. Final setting on the front is 6 clicks plus the factory setting of 16 (tested it by dialing back to zero) - 22 clicks from zero. Front fork has total of 28 clicks from maximum to zero compression on the dial. Turn anti clockwise to soften the compression.

Not sure you recall but i moaned about my eye balls rattling in the sockets from 200km/hr, with the new setting it has reduced it, it's still there but not as bad. Hey I can see the road again.
A suggestion to consider.

Rebound damping is by far the more important, and excessive rebound damping will give a harsh ride that is very difficult to distinguish from compression damping. Another problem, it is very hard to distinguish if a harsh ride is coming from the back or front suspension. You may think it obvious, but the wheels hit that pothole or hump only 5 hundredths of a second apart at 100 kph. Just because you may feel it in the bars, it can still be coming from the back suspension through the frame into the bars.

Also, any subsequent changes you make to rebound damping will affect compression damping as in the vast majority of shocks they are not completely independent circuits. That's why its important to nail the vastly more important rebound damping first.

So my suggestion is back both front and rear compression and rebound damping off till the bike rides like a 40 year old Cadillac with blown out shocks. Then progressively increase the rear rebound damping to remove excessive rear end wallow in fast smooth sweepers, yet still gives an acceptable ride on rough roads. Then bring up the rear compression damping to make any 'micro' adjustment to the firmness of the ride. Then repeat the process for the front suspension.

The logic of this approach is that its far easier with separate compression and rebound adjusters to progressively increase damping in the order of importance, than to decrease say front compression thinking that's what's causing the harsh ride. The reality is it may be excessive rebound damping in the rear that is actually the problem. By bring the damping up in a systematic manner of importance and inter-reaction (rear rebound, rear compression, front rebound, front compression) you minimize the chances of this confusion.

You'll also get a far better feeling of how each adjustment affects the bike (rear rebound being the most important) without interference from the others. This is invaluable knowledge for in the future being more skilled at pin pointing exactly what future fine tuning adjustment you may wish to make.

Good Luck with it.
 

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A suggestion to consider.

Rebound damping is by far the more important, and excessive rebound damping will give a harsh ride that is very difficult to distinguish from compression damping. Another problem, it is very hard to distinguish if a harsh ride is coming from the back or front suspension. You may think it obvious, but the wheels hit that pothole or hump only 5 hundredths of a second apart at 100 kph. Just because you may feel it in the bars, it can still be coming from the back suspension through the frame into the bars.

Also, any subsequent changes you make to rebound damping will affect compression damping as in the vast majority of shocks they are not completely independent circuits. That's why its important to nail the vastly more important rebound damping first.

So my suggestion is back both front and rear compression and rebound damping off till the bike rides like a 40 year old Cadillac with blown out shocks. Then progressively increase the rear rebound damping to remove excessive rear end wallow in fast smooth sweepers, yet still gives an acceptable ride on rough roads. Then bring up the rear compression damping to make any 'micro' adjustment to the firmness of the ride. Then repeat the process for the front suspension.

The logic of this approach is that its far easier with separate compression and rebound adjusters to progressively increase damping in the order of importance, than to decrease say front compression thinking that's what's causing the harsh ride. The reality is it may be excessive rebound damping in the rear that is actually the problem. By bring the damping up in a systematic manner of importance and inter-reaction (rear rebound, rear compression, front rebound, front compression) you minimize the chances of this confusion.

You'll also get a far better feeling of how each adjustment affects the bike (rear rebound being the most important) without interference from the others. This is invaluable knowledge for in the future being more skilled at pin pointing exactly what future fine tuning adjustment you may wish to make.

Good Luck with it.
Agreed. If rebound is to high and compression is too low then chatter will occur. However without touching the rebound and keeping it at factory settings I suffered no chatter. Importantly one should choose a road they are familiar with when testing the suspension. Using the same road, I started at 90kph then adjusted compression 2 clicks anti clockwise, and then up to 105kph and then adjusted compression 2 clicks anti clockwise and then up to 130kph and adjusted the compression again. When I was satisfied and during that time I learned the road I decided to open up the SS and it went around the twistie considerablly smoother in comparison to the initial run. Job done. It comes down to the roads surface so a setting for one might not be a setting for a different road. Finding middle ground is probably ideal. Over 100 miles the surface will change and stopping to adjust the suspension every few miles can be a burden to enjoying the ride.
 

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A suggestion to consider.

Rebound damping is by far the more important, and excessive rebound damping will give a harsh ride that is very difficult to distinguish from compression damping. Another problem, it is very hard to distinguish if a harsh ride is coming from the back or front suspension. You may think it obvious, but the wheels hit that pothole or hump only 5 hundredths of a second apart at 100 kph. Just because you may feel it in the bars, it can still be coming from the back suspension through the frame into the bars.

Also, any subsequent changes you make to rebound damping will affect compression damping as in the vast majority of shocks they are not completely independent circuits. That's why its important to nail the vastly more important rebound damping first.

So my suggestion is back both front and rear compression and rebound damping off till the bike rides like a 40 year old Cadillac with blown out shocks. Then progressively increase the rear rebound damping to remove excessive rear end wallow in fast smooth sweepers, yet still gives an acceptable ride on rough roads. Then bring up the rear compression damping to make any 'micro' adjustment to the firmness of the ride. Then repeat the process for the front suspension.

The logic of this approach is that its far easier with separate compression and rebound adjusters to progressively increase damping in the order of importance, than to decrease say front compression thinking that's what's causing the harsh ride. The reality is it may be excessive rebound damping in the rear that is actually the problem. By bring the damping up in a systematic manner of importance and inter-reaction (rear rebound, rear compression, front rebound, front compression) you minimize the chances of this confusion.

You'll also get a far better feeling of how each adjustment affects the bike (rear rebound being the most important) without interference from the others. This is invaluable knowledge for in the future being more skilled at pin pointing exactly what future fine tuning adjustment you may wish to make.

Good Luck with it.
@John
have you adjusted your SS yet. What have you done. What weight are you. What results were achieved. I think essentially is should give rider confidence through the bikes handling.
 

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@John
have you adjusted your SS yet. What have you done. What weight are you. What results were achieved. I think essentially is should give rider confidence through the bikes handling.
I don't own an SS, just a long term interested observer. And the reason I'm still sitting on the fence is because I'm tall and waiting for someone to comes up with a screen that I think is going to be effective for long rides.

However, while I'm still 'fence sitting' I like to occasionally contribute where I think I can (which you may notice this is now just general topics), and suspensions is one area I've had a fair amount of experience. At the end of the day other than electronic semi active suspensions, modern suspension all work basically the same, some just better than others.
 

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I am away to the big smoke this weekend so I will start my process the weekend after this @John is (mainly, Mostly, Technical, any of these words) correct in his summery and process of rebound and compression set up even to the point of me recognising sentences and paragraphs which are regularly used by experts in various articles I have read over the years. I highly recommend everyone reads articles and watches YouTube videos just to familiarise themselves on how and why there suspension acts like it does . then adapt the most simplest way it works for you. Once you have something that works for you, start discussing it with others who are open to sharing their knowledge ( Note !!I did not Call this Advise )and that's when you start to gain the extra knowledge relevant to you and your bike. I have a simple system which gets me going quick and helps me reach my riding capability's. I hope to extend that further this year into being able to control High & low Speed compression.
 

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I don't own an SS, just a long term interested observer. And the reason I'm still sitting on the fence is because I'm tall and waiting for someone to comes up with a screen that I think is going to be effective for long rides.

However, while I'm still 'fence sitting' I like to occasionally contribute where I think I can (which you may notice this is now just general topics), and suspensions is one area I've had a fair amount of experience. At the end of the day other than electronic semi active suspensions, modern suspension all work basically the same, some just better than others.
There's a few chaps in here that are over 6ft. Some have changed the footpegs and the seat height and position. It's a small compact bike. Have you test ridden one yet. It's a pleasant punchy bike, you should try it.
 

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There's a few chaps in here that are over 6ft. Some have changed the footpegs and the seat height and position. It's a small compact bike. Have you test ridden one yet. It's a pleasant punchy bike, you should try it.
Yip @John I'm 6ft 3 and there is another guy who is 6ft6 (think his name is stretch or Lurch or something lol this is why I bought this bike it is great for tall riders, yes I am also waiting for a taller screen option I'm almost certain I will be buying the Double Bubble touring screen from Power Bronze it seems to be spot on. I do not want a screen that completely protects me from any wind or weather I just want the airflow to be directed to the top of my helmet. With the room available I don't think we will get a screen that will be able to remove any wind buffering to the shoulders. but I'm ok with that, this bike is not a multi or RS BMW.
 

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I can't speak much to the height problem you guys speak of as I'm only 5'8", but I can say that Powerbronze makes a really excellent product. I had one on my Ninja 1000 for about 6 years and it looked as good as the day I got it.
 
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