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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone flush the radiator?

I was planning on removing a plug from the water pump housing to drain the fluid. I "believe" it is the large one peaking out of a small window in the port-side fairing there. This would make it easier since I don't remember seeing a drain on the radiator when I had the port side fairing off...and I can get some limited access to the cap with it still on.....so, will probably leave the fairing on. Would be easier to spot if that is the right plug with the fairing off but I am far to lazy for that. Looks to be my target. ;) Am hoping that I can get most of the system drained with that plug out and the radiator cap off. We'll see if the overflow reservoir is a willing participant or not ;)

Planning to drain, add water/vinegar mix. Run for ~10 min or so to get to temp. Let cool, of course ;) , drain that out with the same plug again, add distilled H20 and run for 10 again. Cool and drain, then will add Engine Ice.

Would appreciate critical input but particularly from anyone having done this.
 

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The plug on the water pump housing is intended for draining the coolant. I don't think it would need a serious flush unless the bike has seen a lot of miles but no harm in doing so. Refill the system via the radiator cap and, if it is like most other Ducatis, on the side stand and it will self bleed. Top it up after running the engine until the thermostat opens. On the SS the reservoir won't drain by itself because it's below the level of the radiator cap.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I don't think it would need a serious flush unless the bike has seen a lot of miles but no harm in doing so.
Changing from ethylene glycol to propylene glycol. Dont want to mix them and figure as long as I am flushing I might as well clean it out.
 

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There's an air bleed on the vertical cylinder but working it is a nightmare. Air gets trapped in the coolant channels, best way to remove any blocked air is to lower the vertical cylinder below the radiator. You'll hear the air bubbling through the system up to the radiator. Try find a small steep embankment, like the bowl of a cricket ground, or any ramp for that matter.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
A few things: Thanks @amoslws good info and I wish I had been following the forum more closely and had seen this
:( It probably does explain why i had to add the coolant into the radiator a shotglass at a time. Took forever to percolate down through.

@Derek you were spot on correct. I drained it out and it could not have been more pristine looking. Definitely no need to flush the system out with vinegar, so I didn't. I did the distilled water fill/ flush to get the pink stuff out but it was unbelievably clear with perfect color like it was straight out of the jug.

Regarding the fairing: I finally just took that top, black piece off which gave me great access to the radiator. It is only two hex screws so no prob at all.

Temperature. It is still a bit early but so far I am amazed how much cooler the bike runs with Engine Ice. Really did make a difference. Looks like the ticket for those of you getting too hot at traffic lights.
 

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@Snowboard Duke How much of a difference did the early indications from using Engine Ice make on temps?
 

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Also, is this concern not applicable to the SS motor...there is no steel anywhere in the SS cooling system?

“It doesn’t have traditional Glycol in it and it will corrode any steel that is present in your coolant system. This includes parts on the water pump like the impeller.” (This posted by an R1 owner.)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Ed, I don't want to give an estimate temp number how much lower until I ride it one more time but after filling it and riding around it was able to idle at stops and run for quite a while but never hit 200. We aren't nearly as warm here as where you are but it was running lower than it has been for those moves previous.

The bike came with Ethylene Glycol coolant. Engine Ice is propylene glycol. I live in a very cool area so I wasn't/am not trying for better cooling, I have a track day booked and ethylene glycol is not allowed.

I did not put Engine Ice in my bike when I was last at the track and this is my first experience with this coolant. I'm sure there are others more experienced with it. However, I believe that propylene glycol is a better coolant as far as heat transfer... BUT... has to be changed more often. That is the big drawback. It doesn't stay good as long as EG coolants which can last 5 years. Company lists the below:

The Engine Ice Hi-Performance Coolant ™ formulation has shown outstanding performance in testing that measures its ability to prevent corrosion within all cooling systems, including aluminum, copper, cast iron, steel, magnesium & solder. Engine Ice Hi-Performance Coolant ™ has shown excellent performance in all of the AS™ D 5216 (Propylene Glycol Base Engine Coolant) tests. Also, Engine Ice Hi-Performance Coolant ™ meets all the corrosion performance requirements of AS™ D 3306 & AS™ 4985 (the main specifications for premium ethylene glycol antifreeze).
 

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I figured manufacturers largely changed to ethylene glycol because it doesn't taste as good when you drink it as propylene glycol....
 

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Discussion Starter #11
@Ed K I have found several sources saying that Engine ice will reduce running temp ~20 degrees F. Now that I have ridden a bit i will say that I believe it reduces it by ~ 10 maybe 15 degrees. I truly do notice a cooler running bike with this stuff.
 

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@Ed K I have found several sources saying that Engine ice will reduce running temp ~20 degrees F. Now that I have ridden a bit i will say that I believe it reduces it by ~ 10 maybe 15 degrees. I truly do notice a cooler running bike with this stuff.
Thanks, significant reduction!

It would be interesting, if possible, to provide another update when the fluid is changed with regards its appearance, color, etc.
 

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@Ed K I have found several sources saying that Engine ice will reduce running temp ~20 degrees F. Now that I have ridden a bit i will say that I believe it reduces it by ~ 10 maybe 15 degrees. I truly do notice a cooler running bike with this stuff.
I’m surprised you notice even that much, that’s good. Lots of people initially say they notice a difference but that’s mostly due to the fact they are watching the temp more often or just the hope it’ll be better and project it is better but most independent research shows little to no difference in normal operation.

Please keep us informed as time goes on. As @Ed K said a longer term update as it gets “used” would be good to know.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I’m surprised you notice even that much, that’s good. Lots of people initially say they notice a difference but that’s mostly due to the fact they are watching the temp more often or just the hope it’ll be better and project it is better but most independent shows little to no difference in normal operation.

Please keep us informed as time goes on. As @Ed K said a longer term update as it gets “used” would be good to know.
ha ha....could be. Yesterday I put ~200 miles on a ride and was thinking....it is running cooler but I think only 10 degrees or so. Perhaps after another 200 I'll amend that down to 5 🤣

Like I said....I'm not looking for cooler temps, just track allowed. In fact, living just outside of Yellowstone NP and Grant Teton NP...I don't need or want cooler...so I hope I keep ammeneding....but for now, the non-scientific, anecdotal observation (you know the same thing that got us the trepanning and blood letting) is that it does run cooler.
 

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Great info thread. Was wondering about changing coolant as bike is 2.5 yrs old now. Worried that it might be like a BMW and require a special tool, but if I can just drain it, tip it up (as above) and refill it then that is good.
I might be advised to measure how much comes out and make sure it is the same as manual / how much goes in??
 

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Great info thread. Was wondering about changing coolant as bike is 2.5 yrs old now. Worried that it might be like a BMW and require a special tool, but if I can just drain it, tip it up (as above) and refill it then that is good.
I might be advised to measure how much comes out and make sure it is the same as manual / how much goes in??
Ahhm, checked manual. 45,000 kms or 4 years. So I won't worry about it yet!!
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Interesting. I am surprised because I thought ethylene glycol started getting old at 3 yrs. And by old I mean losing the anticorrosion qualities. But lets face it....how often to car owners change theirs? Umm....never? Every 10 years? The stuff seems to last very well so I guess not so surprising after all maybe.

I changed to Prop glycol which has an even shorter life so will have to change sooner. Am looking at every other year out of laziness. The company recommends every year and says to use it within 2 years of the manufacture date.

Re: your other question....no special tools needed other than I used a large syringe to drain the coolant reservoir.
 

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