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Six safety criteria I try to keep in mind -

1) How familiar am I with this road?
2) How rested am I?
3) What are the surface conditions?
4) What are the ambient and traffic conditions?
5) Is my bike in top repair?
6) Can I afford the ticket I would warrant if I were caught at this speed?
 

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Invest in yourself

This forum is not much different than many other motorcycle or car enthusiast sites in that the majority of post ( and sections ) are geared towards performance improvements for the motorcycle. Whether it be suspension, tuning, gearing, braking, .etc. All of these are important and quite honestly, fun.

However as majority of us know, ( say this cliche out loud with me...), "the most important improvement you can make to a vehicle is to the nut behind the wheel (in this case, the triple clamps.)."

Think about this. If instead of spending that $1000 + on an exhaust with an accompanying "tune", you invested the same amount of cash in your rider knowledge and/or skills via a motorcycle school or track session. How much better would be your experience (and safety) be on your subsequent rides. Get this, it's totally transferable to your next bike too!

I would LOVE to see a section or rider education specifically with reviews and experiences from attendees of various rider schools.

Some that come to mind in the United States;

CLASS Motorcycle School, Sport riding technique, Track days, California race tracks

Superbike School https://superbikeschool.com/

Motorcycle Safety Foundation https://www.msf-usa.org/

I'm sure there's a lot more and it would be great to hear about our members' experience with them.
 

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We've had a similar issue in South Oz, lost 10 so far this year compared to 2 last year.

Some of us are trying to set up a mentoring program for newer riders through a local facebook group. We've had a couple of runs that seem to be a success. One who had just passed his licence even went as far as getting a suspension setup after watching well setup bikes when he was riding a bucking bronco.

I've started a blog about safety basics, motorcyclementors.info.

Last night I ran a training session with the local fire brigade, in conjunction with an ambo, about handling crashed bikes, first aid (the ambo ran this part) and removing helmets.

We do what we can...
Kudos to you Steve, and a nice site too.
 

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Six safety criteria I try to keep in mind -

1) How familiar am I with this road?
2) How rested am I?
3) What are the surface conditions?
4) What are the ambient and traffic conditions?
5) Is my bike in top repair?
6) Can I afford the ticket I would warrant if I were caught at this speed?[/QUOTE

Agree with above. Interesting article on McPint that includes his speed and safety advice for road riders:


https://www.motorcyclenews.com/news/2018/september/john-mcguinness-bike-riding-techniques/
 

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Very neat place to ride, it appears. We have to watch out for tractors here, but road much wider. Driving in Cornwall a few weeks ago, I’m sure roads were no more than 8 ft wide and many tractors!
 

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Six safety criteria I try to keep in mind -

1) How familiar am I with this road?
2) How rested am I?
3) What are the surface conditions?
4) What are the ambient and traffic conditions?
5) Is my bike in top repair?
6) Can I afford the ticket I would warrant if I were caught at this speed?
Agree with above. Interesting article on McPint that includes his speed and safety advice for road riders:


https://www.motorcyclenews.com/news/2018/september/john-mcguinness-bike-riding-techniques/
Great article! Especially agree about riding within the visibility limits and about always respecting the lower speed limits. I have to admit my definition of lower speeds is 50 km/h or below though as those are usually associated with residential areas/homes/villages, above is mostly open country around here.
 

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Nice reminder of the roads I grew up riding in the 70's and 80's. But not all great riders make great instructors. John Mcguiness is undoubtedly the former. But watch the video and ask yourself what actual advice will improve your riding. Be smooth? Now watch any video of Nick Ienatsch. I don't think I've watched Nick for more than a couple of minutes without picking up a real world technique that can improve my riding. Like John, I grew up snicking into top gear as soon as possible and trying to show my brake light as little as possible. But now, thanks to Nick and others, I make full use of my gearbox, and trail brake into every blind turn. Read and watch as many experts as possible and pick out what works best for you.
 

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I'll add one I saw a bike do and nearly wreck on the interstate last week.

don't follow too closely. pass or give them space. you never know what's on the road in front of the car/truck you're behind or how well they will manage the situation.

I was 3 lanes over but saw a bike fly up on a car and either the car didn't care it was about to hit a semi truck tire or was distracted looking behind them at the bike coming up fast but it popped right up from under the car and hit the bikes face (Not rider, I don't think) I'm sure it caused damage. thankfully he didn't freak out or go down.
 

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I once ran over a semi tread in my Camaro after being to close to the car that kicked up in front of me. By no means was I tailgating when it happened. I just now keep a greater distance. I don't drive or ride next to anyone until the lane is clear and I can pass them as quickly as practical. I also slow down going over blind hills and am careful weaving through traffic.

I wait when the road is clear and go quickly.

I follow the credo "ride as fast as you can see to stop."
 

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Nice reminder of the roads I grew up riding in the 70's and 80's. But not all great riders make great instructors. John Mcguiness is undoubtedly the former. But watch the video and ask yourself what actual advice will improve your riding. Be smooth? Now watch any video of Nick Ienatsch. I don't think I've watched Nick for more than a couple of minutes without picking up a real world technique that can improve my riding. Like John, I grew up snicking into top gear as soon as possible and trying to show my brake light as little as possible. But now, thanks to Nick and others, I make full use of my gearbox, and trail brake into every blind turn. Read and watch as many experts as possible and pick out what works best for you.
Nick is awesome. Great rider, great instructor, great writer. His Pace series on street riding has been a part of my riding since it was first written.

Lee Parks is another good one.
 
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I was 3 lanes over but saw a bike fly up on a car and either the car didn't care it was about to hit a semi truck tire or was distracted looking behind them at the bike coming up fast but it popped right up from under the car and hit the bikes face (Not rider, I don't think) I'm sure it caused damage. thankfully he didn't freak out or go down.
You must be talking about our ride back from the First Annual.

I can’t forget the road gator I ran over....I thought for sure I was going to go down or at least smash up the lower fairing.

I got lucky.
 

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Yesterday evening something happened that is a fairly common occurance, but thought it's worth mentioning.

A car infront of me wanted to race - when the car infront of him turned off the road, he floored it probably expecting me to take the bait. Never something I want to get involved with; although I could've passed him easily but who knows what's ahead? I don't want to come up behind more traffic and then have this hot-shot right behind me. I matched his pace but let him stay way ahead so it was obvious I wasn't getting involved. A side benefit of this is I could use him as a spotter as the route I was taking is a known road for bikes and the previous time I was down there, the police were out catching speeders.
 
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