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We all love speed but as an instructor once told me: speed doesn’t kill, deceleration (stopping) does.
to this day I practice hard braking/short stops constantly. I’m still working my way up to ”stoppies“ on the SS but I can definitely stop her quickly. The brakes are great on the SS. It’s a very well designed bike. (thats my opinion anyway).

I also appreciate the engine braking of a V twin. I keep the rpm no lower than 4500/5k
but learning how to brake and especially trail brake is simply critical.
the only other thing I think is critical: if you really want to fly, go to the track. It’s well worth the money. You learn so much so quickly (especially just how much you really don’t know). It gives you perspective for when you’re back on the street.
 

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I was riding on the North Shore Road between Henderson and Overton, NV yesterday morning. It is a really nice 2 lane curvy road. I jacka$$ on a Honda CBR passed me on my right since there was a double yellow line on my left. I saw him in my rear view mirror and when I looked back at the road he came around me on the right. I didn't see him in my right rear view mirror and only saw him when he was nearly abreast of me. This could have caused an accident If I hadn't been maintaining my lane position.
 

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Reviving an old thread...on "Safety First”.

Easy to say, but hard to do, sometimes when having so much fun! :)

I love having fun on my SS, and usually ride 8/10 - 9/10 on the back roads near me, or elsewhere, when its safe to do so. But every once in a while, I’m enjoying the ride so much that my guard is lowered, and I need to silently remind myself: take it down a notch, Safety First. Or I make a mistake, and try to use it as a lesson to not do it again... even after all these years of riding.

Like today, for example. It is 68F, a beautiful day, back roads are empty, and I’m mov’n fast both on the corners and the straights. And then suddenly just a few feet around one of my fav back road blind corners that opens to a nice little triple digit straight, a car is stopped right in the middle of my lane. A lady parked her car right past the bend because she wanted to prevent a large turtle from being run-over, and is helping it off the road! Yeowsers! Just a minute before I was thinking was a beautiful ride today, no traffic! Fortunately, I didn’t wick it up to 9/10 because it was blind, and left enough time and space to avoid an unpleasant incident. But still, Whew! Reinforced again, to dial back when the line of sight is obstructed. As anything could be around that corner, or over that hill. That had NEVER happened before anywhere near that spot on that road, but it happened. Maybe never will again, maybe.

I would say I’m an aggressive street rider, but try to do it safely. Including trying not to wick it up too far when my line of sight is obstructed around a corner or hill, and/or on unfamiliar roads. If I can see far enough either around the corner or down the straight to take some kind of evasive action, then I go for it. If my line of sight is obstructed, then I try to dial it back to 7/10 or whatever would be needed to enable emergency braking or swerving. But sometimes, forgive me, I forget...!

I also over-took a car today a bit too fast. Not a big deal. Wasn’t anything terribly bad. But when over-taking cars, I try to do it gracefully so as not to scare the driver, or incite any un-necessary drama. There was no problem, but I thought, hmm, I could have over-took that driver more gracefully and given that driver more room when I re-entered the lane in front of them.

Just some thoughts... other safety comments always Welcomed!
 

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Good thinking Ed K

We have all done something that when we reflect on it we think we were foolhardy.
I have over my years of biking, at times gone for overtakes that wern't realy there and when I have just made it, I thought to myself 'what were you thinking' Thankfully I am not the hooligan on 2 wheels I use to be.
I try and poistion myself on the road prior to an overtake so as I can give myself the best possible line of vision and for the car driver to see me in their mirrors.
Like you Ed I try and give cars and other vehicles more room when overtaking; it gives me more room and time to make an emergency manouver should something go wrong and prevents the car driver from being frightened when a bike suddenly appears at their side.

Several years ago I did a day long free BikeSafe Course with the Police. You spend an hour in the classroom and they take you out on observed rides on the roads for the remainder of the day. There were 2 of us in my group and 1 Police Rider and they took us on some quiet spirited rides. It was so funny to have a Police Rider in between the 2 of us and watching all the bikes coming towards us slowing down when they saw the Police Rider. Even better when we came up behind other bikers who slowed down when they saw the Police in thier mirrors and then we overtook them and disappeared off.

The biggest take away from the day for me was my road positioning for overtakes. I use to be too close to the vehicle I was going to overtake, the Police Rider told me to hang further bike, give the car plenty of room and use the superior accelaration of the bike to do a quick, clean overtake. Basic stuff I know, but I had developed the 'boy racer' bad habit of tearing up behind a car, sitting on his tail and wanting to get past him as quick as I can.

If anyone in the UK is thinking if doing a BikeSafe Course, do it

BikeSafe - BikeSafe

A sobering statistic for the county of Dyfed-Powys in Wales where live: Each year in Dyfed-Powys an unacceptable number of riders are either killed or seriously injured. Between 2012 and 2016, the number of motorcyclists to lose their lives on our roads numbered 186! Looking at a ‘good year’ (2012), whilst motorcyclists represent just 0.8% of traffic in Wales, they represented 37% of serious and fatal accidents.
 

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As I approach my 70th birthday and have ridden for over 50years, without any serious incident, but have had some very scary moments. I can highly recommend that riders of any age should take part in as many courses as they can. My working background has been in SAFETY in various disciplines. Aerodrome Reporting Officer responsible for Aerodrome/Airport safety and serviceability inspections, Motorcycle instructor, Pilot Training.

I still shake my head in utter disbelief when I see riders wearing inappropriate clothing. One of the first things we taught learner riders - invest in the best clothing, you only have one body look after it.

Emergency braking, how many of us continue to practice there skills, switch off the ABS. One day you will get off the latest and greatest bike with all the bells and whistles and ride and older bike with no safety aids at all. New bikes and cars with the newest gear can make us complacent.

Down here in Oz we teach the 3 second rule as a minimum distance between ourselves and the vehicle in front and increase that distance when the conditions deteriorate ( other countries do the same). A lot of heavy vehicles have a sign on the rear that says "If you can't see my mirrors I can't see you " the further away from the vehicle on front the greater visibility you have and use your acceleration to pass safety.

Riding safely is about awareness, riding to the road, and weather conditions, observing everything around you, constantly scan your surroundings, think ahead, don't just concentrate on the vehicle in front keep you eyes up and look as far forward as you can and use your peripheral vision. If you look at the pothole you will hit it, don't target fixate.

I am no expert, I ride as quickly as I need to and as safely as I can. Her indoors would not be happy if i was laid up in hospital or worse.

Ride Safe

Cheers Duncan from Tasmania
 

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As I approach my 70th birthday and have ridden for over 50years, without any serious incident, but have had some very scary moments. I can highly recommend that riders of any age should take part in as many courses as they can. My working background has been in SAFETY in various disciplines. Aerodrome Reporting Officer responsible for Aerodrome/Airport safety and serviceability inspections, Motorcycle instructor, Pilot Training.

I still shake my head in utter disbelief when I see riders wearing inappropriate clothing. One of the first things we taught learner riders - invest in the best clothing, you only have one body look after it.

Emergency braking, how many of us continue to practice there skills, switch off the ABS. One day you will get off the latest and greatest bike with all the bells and whistles and ride and older bike with no safety aids at all. New bikes and cars with the newest gear can make us complacent.

Down here in Oz we teach the 3 second rule as a minimum distance between ourselves and the vehicle in front and increase that distance when the conditions deteriorate ( other countries do the same). A lot of heavy vehicles have a sign on the rear that says "If you can't see my mirrors I can't see you " the further away from the vehicle on front the greater visibility you have and use your acceleration to pass safety.

Riding safely is about awareness, riding to the road, and weather conditions, observing everything around you, constantly scan your surroundings, think ahead, don't just concentrate on the vehicle in front keep you eyes up and look as far forward as you can and use your peripheral vision. If you look at the pothole you will hit it, don't target fixate.

I am no expert, I ride as quickly as I need to and as safely as I can. Her indoors would not be happy if i was laid up in hospital or worse.

Ride Safe

Cheers Duncan from Tasmania
Truth.
 
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