Ducati Supersport 939 Forum banner
1 - 20 of 66 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,531 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was quite shocked (see what I did there?) at the recorded shock temps on the Superpsort, the S will obviously be the same.

So I contacted Ohlins head office in Sweden to enquire what the maximum operating temperatures should be. I didn't refer to any particular make of bike.
The first response was to contact my local distributor. Isn't this just terrible?

However persistence has got me a response. Which is cause for concern, I attach the response below. Perhaps some one could contact Sachs with a similar question?

Operating temperature should be between 70 -150
C depending on which bike at what it’s been used for.
The shocks can take a higher temperature but this will affect the damping characteristics.
Some dampers sit very close to the exhaust for example and in these cases we set the damping according to the working temperature when we track and road test the bikes.

I hope this information helps.

Med vänliga hälsningar/ Best regards,
Andrew Notman

Product Specialist MC R&T
Sales, Marketing & Racing.

I have written back with the details of the bike and the temperatures that members have recorded. Let's see if I get a response to that.

I know he mentions some bikes get hotter due to shock placement, but more than double?

Steve
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
316 Posts
I was quite shocked (see what I did there?) at the recorded shock temps on the Superpsort, the S will obviously be the same.

So I contacted Ohlins head office in Sweden to enquire what the maximum operating temperatures should be. I didn't refer to any particular make of bike.
The first response was to contact my local distributor. Isn't this just terrible?

However persistence has got me a response. Which is cause for concern, I attach the response below. Perhaps some one could contact Sachs with a similar question?

Operating temperature should be between 70 -150
C depending on which bike at what it’s been used for.
The shocks can take a higher temperature but this will affect the damping characteristics.
Some dampers sit very close to the exhaust for example and in these cases we set the damping according to the working temperature when we track and road test the bikes.

I hope this information helps.

Med vänliga hälsningar/ Best regards,
Andrew Notman

Product Specialist MC R&T
Sales, Marketing & Racing.

I have written back with the details of the bike and the temperatures that members have recorded. Let's see if I get a response to that.

I know he mentions some bikes get hotter due to shock placement, but more than double?

Steve
Well done Steve - very interesting, please keep us in the loop:smile2:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
442 Posts
I haven't looked at my bike however, I wonder if its possible to wrap the pipe to reduce the heat exposure to the shock. Or is the source of the heat the cat? Like I said before if an aftermarket company can fix the exhaust issue, they will sell a boatload of product.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,240 Posts
I haven't looked at my bike however, I wonder if its possible to wrap the pipe to reduce the heat exposure to the shock. Or is the source of the heat the cat? Like I said before if an aftermarket company can fix the exhaust issue, they will sell a boatload of product.
It's the cat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
I mentioned this in another thread as well, but just wanted to get it out to as many eyes as possible:

Ducati does seem to know that the heat is not good for the shock because they are agreeing to replace mine when they install whatever fix it is they develop. At first they said, "No the shock is fine" but after I pushed back on that answer through my dealer, they have apparently acquiesced and have said "ok" to replacing it as well.

So if/when you have this heat issue, make sure you let them know that you also expect to have the shock replaced!! 900 degree heat/cool cycles can in no way be good for the coil metal or the shock fluid. Better to be safe than sorry IMHO.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,240 Posts
I'll be interested to see how this works out for you...and subsequently us. Problem is we are waiting on Ducati. This could be a long wait from what I've read on other forums...if it ever actually does happen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
I mentioned this in another thread as well, but just wanted to get it out to as many eyes as possible:

Ducati does seem to know that the heat is not good for the shock because they are agreeing to replace mine when they install whatever fix it is they develop. At first they said, "No the shock is fine" but after I pushed back on that answer through my dealer, they have apparently acquiesced and have said "ok" to replacing it as well.

So if/when you have this heat issue, make sure you let them know that you also expect to have the shock replaced!! 900 degree heat/cool cycles can in no way be good for the coil metal or the shock fluid. Better to be safe than sorry IMHO.
Replacing the shock will do nothing and you will see the same happening again so you can replace the shock many times! The point is, the shock works great. The heat doesn't influence the working of it. Done 5000km until now and the bike handels superb!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Replacing the shock will do nothing and you will see the same happening again so you can replace the shock many times!
Well when Ducati develops and releases the fix, this should prevent further heat issues, so I should only need one replacement.

I was simply stating when you take your bike in for the recall to also ask for the shock to be replaced as well.

You def don't have to do it, but I would rather have the peace of mind knowing that I have a shock that wasn't exposed to these levels of heat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,531 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Ok, after the first question about max temperatures to Ohlins, I was more open and explained what bike and the temps that were being recorded.. I had this reply this morning.

It should be fine with our shock, we have been making OEM shocks for S model Ducati’s for years and many of them sit close to the cylinders and exhausts.
The shock itself can take up to 800 degrees before it starts melting, this is not good for the performance obviously but it won’t melt anyway.
If you have any issues, which I don’t think you will, but if you do then as it’s an OEM product you would have to go through your Ducati dealer who in turn will take up the issue with our OEM dept.

Med vänliga hälsningar/ Best regards,
Andrew Notman
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
326 Posts
according to the poll, I don't think so.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Has anyone noticed any issues on the S?
In all honesty I would believe they have to be... I wonder if the poll not having an option to vote "yes and I have a an S" option is skewing the results? Or the title of the thread, "Non S model heat issues"?

I wonder how many S owners actually checked?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
In all honesty I would believe they have to be... I wonder if the poll not having an option to vote "yes and I have a an S" option is skewing the results? Or the title of the thread, "Non S model heat issues"?

I wonder how many S owners actually checked?
I've checked each time my bike ( S ) was in 'heat' conditions : traffic mainly.
Weather is very hot these days in Paris, I've been in Paris traffic the hottest day of the year (June 21), my legs and my ass burned, my balls were cooked, but the bike had nothing melted...
However, I expect to have problems due to the heat one of these days.
There's one thing to avoid, it's to put your smartphone in charge under the seat... I can't imagine a Samsung s7 there, as it has already heat issues without being on a Ducati...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,816 Posts
I haven't noticed anything on mine either under reasonably hot, but not extreme, conditions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Its a shame they didn't place the shock off to the side like the do on the Panigale models.

It is not like Ducati is new to this and it is pretty obvious that the shock is too freaking close to the exhaust pipe.

I mean if you have to intentionally dent the pipe to make room for the shock there is a design flaw, LOL.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
886 Posts
I think the proximity has more to do with the parts bin than it does poor design, though some would say a parts bin design *is* a poor design.

Judging by the part numbers and diagrams, it's a shared design with the Monster 1200. The difference is that the Monster routes the exhaust differently than the Supersport, which may contribute to different heat dissipation patterns under the bike.
 
1 - 20 of 66 Posts
Top