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Discussion Starter #1
I have noticed some have posted that the SuperSport is not a sport touring motorcycle.

From my perspective sport touring is not interstate highway cruising or riding with a pillion. I consider sport touring as a multi-day ride on scenic and challenging roads.

The SS meets my needs perfectly with the OEM panniers, DQS and heated grips. It is light enough that the curvy roads are fun rather than tiring. It is comfortable enough to ride more than 500 mi/day. The 4 gal fuel tank is adequate for most routes with good gasoline mileage. The mid range torque is fabulous for twisty mountain roads. The DQS allows effortless shifting in the twisty mountain roads. The heated grips are nice on cool morning when Gerbing heated gloves are not needed. I use Gerbing gear in Winter riding.

I have ridden several multi day rides and can vouch for the suitability of the SS to be a great sport touring motorcycle. I would not want to tour on a motorcycle that was any heavier or taller than the SS. The panniers are adequate for a 5 day ride without even expanding them or adding a tank or tail bag.

A few weeks ago I rode from Las Vegas to Oregon and back through the challenging Siskiyou mountain roads near Yreka, CA. A week from Sunday I will ride up to MT via Escalante, UT, Berthoud Pass and Trail Ridge Road. On my way back I will ride the Beartooth Highway and the Chief Joseph Highway.
 

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No argument from me. It would certainly have fit the category when the term was quoined and bikes like the VFR750 and BMW RS ruled. Even BMW must be confused; don't we understand that the RS is the sport tourer and RT is the tourer.
 

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Are you taking highway 12 near Escalante? If so be careful you go off their your a goner. The factory bags look nice but 1500 dollars that's insane!!
 

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I have noticed some have posted that the SuperSport is not a sport touring motorcycle.

From my perspective sport touring is not interstate highway cruising or riding with a pillion. I consider sport touring as a multi-day ride on scenic and challenging roads.

The SS meets my needs perfectly with the OEM panniers, DQS and heated grips. It is light enough that the curvy roads are fun rather than tiring. It is comfortable enough to ride more than 500 mi/day. The 4 gal fuel tank is adequate for most routes with good gasoline mileage. The mid range torque is fabulous for twisty mountain roads. The DQS allows effortless shifting in the twisty mountain roads. The heated grips are nice on cool morning when Gerbing heated gloves are not needed. I use Gerbing gear in Winter riding.

I have ridden several multi day rides and can vouch for the suitability of the SS to be a great sport touring motorcycle. I would not want to tour on a motorcycle that was any heavier or taller than the SS. The panniers are adequate for a 5 day ride without even expanding them or adding a tank or tail bag.

A few weeks ago I rode from Las Vegas to Oregon and back through the challenging Siskiyou mountain roads near Yreka, CA. A week from Sunday I will ride up to MT via Escalante, UT, Berthoud Pass and Trail Ridge Road. On my way back I will ride the Beartooth Highway and the Chief Joseph Highway.
Been a while since you've been seen in here. Welcome back. Safe journey next week!
 

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Are you taking highway 12 near Escalante? If so be careful you go off their your a goner. The factory bags look nice but 1500 dollars that's insane!!
One of the more spectacular rides and enjoyable rides I’ve had the pleasure. Hope you had a safe ride there. I don’t recall it particularly risky. But riding a long wheelbase, fully-loaded street bike over the nearby Moki Dugway, well, a little care was needed there...
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Just did 300 miles via Utah 12 last Sat :)

it definitely is on the far Sport edge of sport touring bike in my opinion....but, that is why I bought it :) My only complaint is that my legs get cramped and I have to pause often for a stretch......but, I don't want a change. i want it just like that and i will just keep pausing :)
I will be riding on Utah 12, I have ridden it before. It is much less challenging than the route I rode recently in northern CA or Trail Ridge road or the Beartooth.
 

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...........for sure the SS isn't an FJR, MS, Trophy, Versus, Norge, RT, RS, K bike, Duke, VFR, or ST.

Another category?

I've taken the SS for a week's trip for 1500k+ miles. But it ain't them. 6k miles in 6 months.
 

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There’s “Sport Tourers” (things from the distant Past) and “SuperSport Tourers” (of Today)... Haha...
This is it in a nutshell, because it all depends on what you want/need/expect out of your “sport tourer”:

- If you want a one up, SPORT tourer, there’s really none better.
- If you want a two up SPORT tourer, there are better options, a top box with a backrest and legroom for the passenger makes the difference. KTM Super Duke GT or the Triumph Sprint are two that come to mind.
- If you want a one up, sport TOURER, there are better options. See most BMW sport touring offerings.
- If you want a two up, sport TOURER, there are better options. FJR, ST, Concours, etc. are a few.
- If your body can put up with the ergos, the SS is a great longer distance SPORTS TOURER.

The SS is everything the VFR was supposed to be but isn’t (mainly FUN and exciting), and is very close to the perfect do-it-all sport styled bike but does have a slightly aggressive riding position and is somewhat limited for long distances depending on what you’re doing and how you pack it.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I did an Iron Butt about 6 weeks ago. It needs cruise control to be perfect.
I am disappointed that cruise control was not offered as an option or as standard equipment. I only miss it when I am leading and try to hold a constant speed on straight stretches. I would never use cruise control in the curvy mountain roads.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
This is it in a nutshell, because it all depends on what you want/need/expect out of your “sport tourer”:

- If you want a one up, SPORT tourer, there’s really none better.
- If you want a two up SPORT tourer, there are better options, a top box with a backrest and legroom for the passenger makes the difference. KTM Super Duke GT or the Triumph Sprint are two that come to mind.
- If you want a one up, sport TOURER, there are better options. See most BMW sport touring offerings.
- If you want a two up, sport TOURER, there are better options. FJR, ST, Concours, etc. are a few.
- If your body can put up with the ergos, the SS is a great longer distance SPORTS TOURER.

The SS is everything the VFR was supposed to be but isn’t (mainly FUN and exciting), and is very close to the perfect do-it-all sport styled bike but does have a slightly aggressive riding position and is somewhat limited for long distances depending on what you’re doing and how you pack it.
I will be 70 next month. As a geezer I find the riding position perfect. A more upright position would make me feel like a sail. I like the leg position and feel more in control with my legs slightly rearward. I would not be comfortable with my legs further to the rear.

I agree with your first point about one up sport touring, but the third point is conflicting the first point.

I agree that there are many better options for two up touring, but I would never consider two up touring to be sport touring.
 

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I will be 70 next month. As a geezer I find the riding position perfect. A more upright position would make me feel like a sail. I like the leg position and feel more in control with my legs slightly rearward. I would not be comfortable with my legs further to the rear.
That’s awesome you’re able to find it so comfortable at your age. My 69 year old dad finds it very comfy, as do I at almost 48, fat and with a bad back, but there are other bikes, not upright ones, that are more comfortable for me for longer times. I find the SS position almost perfect, but my Sprint with the Corbin seat is even better with the bars a little more forward and down a bit more, and the legs slightly more rearward. I can go about half as much longer on the Sprint before a rest than the Duc, until the road twists.

I agree with your first point about one up sport touring, but the third point is conflicting the first point.
How so? The Duc is great, don’t get me wrong, but I have to concentrate on my speed and throttle position when droning down the highway or especially interstate getting to the fun places because the throttle is very touchy and the Twin is very torquey. On my Triumph, VFRs or the K1200 BMW I owned for a short time, it wasn’t anything I thought of nearly as much, the throttle was a lot less “instant” and the difference between 70 and 100 wasn’t a slight turn away. Going back to the words I capitalized I think the SS is a great “sport touring” bike with the emphasis on the “sport” where others can be better at the “touring” portion.

I agree that there are many better options for two up touring, but I would never consider two up touring to be sport touring.
Ooo, sorry to hear that. My wife is a great pillion, and we’ve had no problems showing guys in their full leathers at a “full race” tuck on their rockets how an older couple out for a Sunday ride can actually corner as they watch us pass then see our taillight disappear when the road tightens up in our jeans and street jackets listening to music on the Sena. I actually almost hate to say that I’m not much slower two up than I am solo a lot of the time. It’s a beautiful thing, really.

I’m not sure where you reside but for me I have to ride (tour) an hour or more of fairly straight roads before I get to the curvy areas where the sport runs free. When I lived in Madison, Wisconsin I was surrounded by curves that were literally minutes away from my house. I’d jump on the bike on Saturday morning, ride 300-400 miles that day and never be upright for more than 5 miles at a stretch yet never be more than an hour or two from my house. That was when my Superhawk, CBR929RR and 954 really shined. Once I moved here I went back to the VFRs and more comfy sport bikes after a try on a CBR1000RR. I find Southern or Mountain riding to be the same, much easier to find the Sport aspect because of the terrain, in fact I’d probably keep the Triumph and get a supersport bike instead of the SuperSport if I lived closer to the corners.

It’s great your definition of “Sport Touring” is so heavily “Sport” leaning, especially at your age. My dad is the same way, and I hope to still be riding that style at your guys’ age.
 

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Shows just how 'personal' riding position is, and why it's pointless to ask anyone's opinion.

I still own a 94 VFR and a 2007 Triumph ST1050.

The VFR is largely retired and only kept in the hope that it makes money one day, not for me but perhaps my son.

On paper the Triumph is a better SportTOURER. Bigger tank, better mpg, larger panniers, and cruise control (but that was an add on that I fitted).

That said, I've ridden nearly 10,000 mls since I bought the SSS last October. Of that the combined milage on the VFR and ST is less than 200 mls.

I'd thought the Triumph would be my first choice for multi day tours. But that hasn't happened. (Although it might have if I didn't live 5 minutes from Monarch Pass)

For my old bones the SSS is near perfect. The seat is by far the most comfortable, even than the custom Sargent on my Triumph. Foot pegs and bars are in the perfect position. I'd like CC but the throttle is so light that it would be more for licence preservation than anything else. The mirrors suck, but a $20 bar end cured that.

Bottom line. Members on this forum can give great input on long term ownership like reliability, dealer support etc. But only you know what fit and feel works for you. Sit on lots of bikes, narrow your list down, then test ride.

I was convinced that my next bike would be a Tracer GT. Loved everything I read about it. It has CC. Loved the look. Then I sat on it. Felt like I was on a Gold Wing.
 

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Shows just how 'personal' riding position is, and why it's pointless to ask anyone's opinion.

I still own a 94 VFR and a 2007 Triumph ST1050.

The VFR is largely retired and only kept in the hope that it makes money one day, not for me but perhaps my son.

On paper the Triumph is a better SportTOURER. Bigger tank, better mpg, larger panniers, and cruise control (but that was an add on that I fitted).

That said, I've ridden nearly 10,000 mls since I bought the SSS last October. Of that the combined milage on the VFR and ST is less than 200 mls.

I'd thought the Triumph would be my first choice for multi day tours. But that hasn't happened. (Although it might have if I didn't live 5 minutes from Monarch Pass)

For my old bones the SSS is near perfect. The seat is by far the most comfortable, even than the custom Sargent on my Triumph. Foot pegs and bars are in the perfect position. I'd like CC but the throttle is so light that it would be more for licence preservation than anything else. The mirrors suck, but a $20 bar end cured that.

Bottom line. Members on this forum can give great input on long term ownership like reliability, dealer support etc. But only you know what fit and feel works for you. Sit on lots of bikes, narrow your list down, then test ride.

I was convinced that my next bike would be a Tracer GT. Loved everything I read about it. It has CC. Loved the look. Then I sat on it. Felt like I was on a Gold Wing.
You make really good points, and absolutely prove how different people are and what works for them.

I think if I had a Sprint ST and not the GT I would probably choose the Duc over the Triumph every trip no matter the straight road distance. I really wanted to like the ST but never came to grips with it, riding both a 955 and the 1050, then I rode the GT, went and picked up my wife and 10 miles later we knew we finally found our bike we’d been looking for.

I was the same way with the Tracer and Tracer GT. I was absolutely convinced it would be my two up bike after being so impressed with the 900 Yamaha triple motor but so unimpressed with the FZ-09 chassis. We rode one at a demo day and it was nice but way too upright and from initial impressions I thought I’d end up in the circle that was trying to put lower bars on the NC700X I had for a while. Hint: you really can’t go much lower without hitting the tank or fairing at full lock.

I’m jealous of your 94 VFR. That gen is my favorite, had a 97 and it was such a great bike, to me it was my favorite riding VFR, pretty **** sporty but I liked the red with white wheels 90 VFR the best looks wise. I looked for one a few years ago and they are hard to find in good shape. Most have been ridden, what they were designed to do.
 
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...Bottom line. Members on this forum can give great input on long term ownership like reliability, dealer support etc. But only you know what fit and feride. el works for you. Sit on lots of bikes, narrow your list down, then test...
Exactly.

To me, the current idea of a sports tourer (multistrada, Africa Twin, etc) is not a SPORTS tourer.

This bike, to me (and wife), has the fit, performance, and handling of a sports tourer. It scatches,tours, and commutes. You can do 600Ks without walking like John Wayne. It scrapes pegs with the best of them until the silly side of 100 mph (sorry,officer, I meant 100 kmh). And yet you can ride it to work.

Fit is everything, and yet old school sports tourers have always given me that fit.

Try basic ergonomics. You can get after market goodies to make any bike fit any rider, but you need to factor that in to the overall cost of ownership.
 

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I've done nearly 700 miles over the last few days on varied roads; motorway, A-roads, B-roads, unclassified single track roads. Yes, to me the Supersport is definitely a "Sports Tourer" :)
 
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