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After digesting the War and Peace-length novel that is the Ducati Supersport Owners Manual, I have a question.

For what weight rider are the "stock" spring preload settings mentioned in the manual? In previous Ducati manuals, they have specified that the spring preload is set for an "average weight rider" of X weight (I recall it being about 160 lbs). Is that the case on the SS? If so, what is that weight?

I ask because I imagine I am not an average weight rider and that I should adjust the preload in accordance with my weight. I would also surmise that I should adjust the preload further when I have someone riding on the back? Am I correct? If so, should I also adjust the front suspension preload when I have a 2nd rider?

I'd appreciate any feedback.
 
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After digesting the War and Peace-length novel that is the Ducati Supersport Owners Manual, I have a question.

For what weight rider are the "stock" spring preload settings mentioned in the manual? In previous Ducati manuals, they have specified that the spring preload is set for an "average weight rider" of X weight (I recall it being about 160 lbs). Is that the case on the SS? If so, what is that weight?

I ask because I imagine I am not an average weight rider and that I should adjust the preload in accordance with my weight. I would also surmise that I should adjust the preload further when I have someone riding on the back? Am I correct? If so, should I also adjust the front suspension preload when I have a 2nd rider?

I'd appreciate any feedback.
You raise a good point, this has been asked previously in this forum but no one has been able to provide an answer. Also, average weight varies from country to country, but if it even mentioned 80kg's we would at least have a base to work from. Force=mass*acceleration & Torque=force*distance. Or simply try and test until you find the happy medium.
 

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There is a pretty specific method to set preload covered throughout the internet, starting with measuring static, then seated preload and adjusting accordingly. If you can't get preload set correctly then a spring change is in order.

Considering the "sport touring" nature of the bike - 2 up seating and available panniers, I'm guessing it's sprung to accommodate a total weight of 350 lbs. If it's just you with no luggage, that spring is probably going to be pretty stiff and you will unlikely be able to set a good preload with it.
 
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Considering the "sport touring" nature of the bike - 2 up seating and available panniers, I'm guessing it's sprung to accommodate a total weight of 350 lbs.
Are you saying that the bike is factory set to allow for max loading of 350lbs (158.8kg)? If so, I don't know that this is necessarily the case. I would think that the bike is setup from the factory as all their other bikes are...if that's the stated 160lbs (72.6kg), or whatever. I wouldn't think that Ducati would assume that a majority of their potential riders will be riding two up with a full set of panniers and adjust the setup, by default, to account for this. At least I hope not, because I probably weight 160lbs with a full set of gear on and have no plans for panniers and the wife will not be riding for a while with me. I will need to adjust the rates to accommodate my much lighter load, if so. In my past years and several different makes and models of bikes, the factory settings have be just about right from the start. I hope this is still the case. On my test ride last week, it sure felt like it was spot on.
 

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Every owner should know how to set the "SAG" for the bike to be correct for the rider. The SAG is the amount the rear of the bike squats down with just the rider fully kitted up aboard. It is adjusted with the spring preload. Google it and you will find a million ways to do it correctly, even some Youtube videos.
 

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Are you saying that the bike is factory set to allow for max loading of 350lbs (158.8kg)? If so, I don't know that this is necessarily the case. I would think that the bike is setup from the factory as all their other bikes are...if that's the stated 160lbs (72.6kg), or whatever. I wouldn't think that Ducati would assume that a majority of their potential riders will be riding two up with a full set of panniers and adjust the setup, by default, to account for this. At least I hope not, because I probably weight 160lbs with a full set of gear on and have no plans for panniers and the wife will not be riding for a while with me. I will need to adjust the rates to accommodate my much lighter load, if so. In my past years and several different makes and models of bikes, the factory settings have be just about right from the start. I hope this is still the case. On my test ride last week, it sure felt like it was spot on.
Most of the Ducati bikes come sprung assuming an ocassional passenger. Stiffer than necessary for a solo rider, but not quite stiff enough for 2 up plus luggage. That they developed a specific pannier "touring" kit leads me to believe they have sprung this for something more than *just* the rider. The only way to know is put your kit on and get a buddy with a ruler.

The R models and/or mono-posto's come sprung correctly for a single rider @ 160 lbs.
 

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Every owner should know how to set the "SAG" for the bike to be correct for the rider. The SAG is the amount the rear of the bike squats down with just the rider fully kitted up aboard. It is adjusted with the spring preload. Google it and you will find a million ways to do it correctly, even some Youtube videos.
You can set the sag at both ends of the bike, not just the rear. But yes, Google it.

Technicaly, your description is correct, how much the bike settles with someone on it. What you are actually setting up is how much "lift" the bike will get before topping out the suspension, or how "deep" into a road irregularity that the wheel will extend itself before reaching the limit of extension of the suspension. Any movement between your sag setting and your full lift setting is pressure that the tire is still exerting on the road, which makes for a much smoother, controlled ride.
 

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Ok so I got my bike on Friday bunked off work early so I could get there on time. Trailered it back as the weather was crappy. Rode it most of Saturday and set the SAG today. Very Intresting results I always try and get an ideal SAG no of 34mm front and Back. I checked the rear 1st and without any adjustments and as luck would have it it was bang on 34mm. I then checked the front and it was at 60mm. So I set about adjusting preload to get the front to the ideal 34mm, after a few adjustments and re-measures it became apparent that I would not be getting to 34 from 60 . So long story short I settled at 50mm Front which still ment that the front was lower than the back so adjusted the rear to 50mm to achieve SAG ( I left 1 1/2 turns of preload in the front so I have a little room to adjust later probably get it to 48mm Max) I took it for a ride and it feels spot.
I am 98kilo and about 106 with full gear. I would be interested in what SAG no you guys are getting as I didn't expect not to be able to get below 50mm thanks
 

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Reviving this thread.

I got my front sag at 2 turns in, 44 mm (or 34% travel) and rear is 49mm (or 34% travel). I weigh 170 lbs with full gear.

FYI. Using Ohlins decoder chart, the -36/105 labeled on the rear spring rate is 600 lb/in (or 105 N/mm). That is what I originally had sized on my M696 Ohlins.
 

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Reviving this thread.

I got my front sag at 2 turns in, 44 mm (or 34% travel) and rear is 49mm (or 34% travel). I weigh 170 lbs with full gear.

FYI. Using Ohlins decoder chart, the -36/105 labeled on the rear spring rate is 600 lb/in (or 105 N/mm). That is what I originally had sized on my M696 Ohlins.
At 170 lbs, I would have thought the stock settings to be very close to ideal.
 

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After digesting the War and Peace-length novel that is the Ducati Supersport Owners Manual, I have a question.

For what weight rider are the "stock" spring preload settings mentioned in the manual? In previous Ducati manuals, they have specified that the spring preload is set for an "average weight rider" of X weight (I recall it being about 160 lbs). Is that the case on the SS? If so, what is that weight?

I ask because I imagine I am not an average weight rider and that I should adjust the preload in accordance with my weight. I would also surmise that I should adjust the preload further when I have someone riding on the back? Am I correct? If so, should I also adjust the front suspension preload when I have a 2nd rider?

I'd appreciate any feedback.
Fish, since there's no remote preload adjustment for the rear, you will want to set your preload once (front and rear) and leave it there.

You can measure and adjust your spring preload yourself if you have stands (or other method) to suspend the front and rear wheels off the ground (don't have to be at the same time).

I created a one-page suspension worksheet a few years ago that makes setting your static sag and ride height easy! Print it out and use it for your measurements.

Suspension Worksheet

You want about 30mm of ride height--that's the difference in mm between a) the bike suspended off the ground without rider and b) the bike on the ground with rider and his gear--for both the forks and the rear shock. The front forks can have a slightly higher number (5-10mm) than the rear. Measure from the axle to somewhere higher on the bike frame.

Let me know if you have any questions.
 

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At 170 lbs, I would have thought the stock settings to be very close to ideal.
They should be in theory. I realized that after getting my M696 suspension (Showa M1100 forks and Ohlins DU737) revalved and resprung recently, that these stock Ohlins need to be revalved as the compression/rebound adjusters aren't doing anything dramatic, granted its all low-speed damping.
 

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I have the standard model. I had the dealer set the sag for my weight (classified secret). I am happy with the preload.

The rear seems a tad sharp going over some of the ripples and dips in our local roads. I just adjusted the rebound, wanting to loosen it one "click". I was surprised that it is a screw adjustment with no detents. I turned it counterclockwise one full turn. I assume that this counts as an incremental level of adjustment.

Perhaps someone might know this, if not, I'll report my experience.
 

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Update. Rode the bike after adjusting the rear shock rebound (per above). It seemed to improve the ride over sharp bumps as desired.
 

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Update. Rode the bike after adjusting the rear shock rebound (pre above). It seemed to improve the ride over sharp bumps as desired.
It's good to adjust and play with the suspension set up to get the feel of the diferance but it's easy to get out of whack and then you won't feel any diferance it will just feel wrong. Make sure you document where you are and the changes so you can always go back to what was working. You said the rear felt a bit sharp as it went over ripples. Have you checked if you have any free sag at top out. If you lift the rear end of the bike it should travel at least 10mm befor it tops out and you run out of travel. I thought I would suggest you check this first as if you have no free travel it will give you these symptoms.
 

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Rhino, when you say free travel, you mean that the preload is maxed out and has no additional stiffening adjustment?
 

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Rhino, when you say free travel, you mean that the preload is maxed out and has no additional stiffening adjustment?
I think he's saying how much the bike squats using just the bikes weight on it, without the rider on it.

If you have the bike on the side stand and lift the backend up you should have some movement up until the shock "tops" out. If not, you should adjust some in.
 
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It seems to me that any time the suspension preload is tested unladen , then it must be that the travel is maxed out.

At any rate, riding over the same section of road, the harshness seems much better after one turn of the rebound screw. I am fairly happy with the sag and compliance.

The reason I asked about it in the first place was the Sachs shock didn't have a detent "clicker" for rebound adjust. It was just a turn on a screw, I went a full 360.
 

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Rhino, when you say free travel, you mean that the preload is maxed out and has no additional stiffening adjustment?
It is very important to have free sag, when you bike is level and sitting under its on weight you need to be able to lift the bike up against the suspension about 10mm. This prevents you being trampolined in the air. Forks will likely have a bit more.

Then you need to measure the amount your weight compresses the suspension. The free sag, plus the amount you compress the suspension, is your sag.

You need to be able to get about 30% of the suspensions travel to set your sag. This is around 35 to 40 mm on a bike with 140mm travel (is the superport). For track work you need less sag, say about 30mm.

If you can get the right amount of sag, but do not have free sag you will need to change your fork or shock springs. Similarly, if you use all (or hardly any) of your pretension adjustments to get the sag figures you will need to change springs accordingly.

But, make sure you have free sag...
 
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