Ducati Supersport 939 Forum banner

1 - 20 of 45 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm just riding so many short days on twisties, and I want the handling of the V2 for that. I'm really sad I can' afford to keep both at the moment, but I can always get another SSS one day, or maybe something else, for longer rides.

I'm very excited about the V2, obviously. It's one hell of a bike, and while it's lacking the comfort of the SSS, I really want the cornering precision. It's night and day from the SSS.

Alas.....here we go!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Good luck and enjoy the new ride! Post back a comparison when you've had a chance to ride the V2 for a few miles...I've always been right on the fence as well regarding full out sportbike vs. sport touring.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,966 Posts
@Allen F Sounds like you’ve ridden the V2...yes?

I really enjoyed my demo ride on the V2, fantastic bike!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
146 Posts
Enjoy and looking forward to reading the comparison post!

(y)
 

·
Registered
Supersport 939 S 2019
Joined
·
12 Posts
I had similar thoughts as Allen F. I took a V2 for a test drive one afternoon a couple of weeks ago, and it's a lovely bike. But I'm afraid there is no room for two bikes in my budget, so I will probably trade my SSS for a V2 in August.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I was thinking that the SS can lead you over to any number of bikes in the Ducati lineup, depending on what you want more of. I wanted more sportiness, so I moved to the V2. I could totally see swapping the SS for a Multistrada 950 with some solid panniers and so on, if you wanted more touring capability. And I could see someone going to a Monster for the naked experience. I'm sure that's true for some other models, too, but it seems to me that few brands have the slot filled that the SS fills, and so it is closer to a number of bikes because of that.

With all that said: Yes, I wasn't entirely sold on the V2 until I rode it and the V4.

The V4 is so effing amazing in ten different ways, and yet it's just way too much bike in ten different ways, too. With the V2, I feel like I have the exact same precise handling as I do with the V4 standard (however, the semi-active suspension on the V4S was ridiculously amazing). The V4 and V2 are very similar in geometry, with the most noticeable difference being the width at your crotch. Obvs. the V2 is much narrower.

But what truly sets the bikes apart is the engines. And the V2 has NOTHING on that V4 in terms of sound, power, smoothness, excitement, etc.... But the V2 has an entirely different vibe. It's way more like the SS engine. Like it's bigger, tougher brother.

Think of your SS with its power band still starting around 6k, but now it goes up to 11k (redline is at 12k), and all of that is usable with no deletions of Hp to meet emissions standards, etc.... It just keeps getting faster at going faster as it goes faster....you know what I mean: the SS is a bit linear, and the V2 is more of a ski jump - but, and this is important to me, the V2 never lurches from acceleration (the V4 does that readily).

I'm 50 and need to loose 20 (ok 30) lbs, and yet the V2 is really ridable for me. I wont say comfortable, but for the position it puts you in it's incredibly comfortable! It asks much more of you than the SS does, that's for sure. But, to be honest, what I lose to my wrists I gain in my (somewhat wonky) back. And it's a really fun position to be in. I think that racing position is fun in and of itself, but on the V2 it's even more fun because it's comfy. I also feel that it's the right position for the bike, whereas on some sport bikes the position seems gratuitously aggressive.

So, I'm going to go stare at it in the garage. I'll report back after riding it some more!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
716 Posts
Very helpful review. Enjoy and report back more.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Allen F

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I am using the stock exhaust (for now). I certainly don't need more power or sound, but that doesn't mean I wont go for it soon. :)

Went out to my favorite twisties this AM on the V2. My impression of the engine is that it's like having two totally different engines, depending on where you ride in the revs. From like 4k to 8k, it's much like the SS engine. If, instead you keep the lower RPMs around 6-7k and go up from there, it's got acceleration that truly surpasses the SS. Enjoying the lower torquey range makes the V2 really ridable in traffic, or on the highway for mileage, etc. And when I want to scream "hell yes!" I just ride in the higher rev range. Exiting a corner around 6k makes for a smooth exit and then a blast of power as the bike stands back up. So fun!

The heat under the seat of the V2 isn't too bad. The V4 was HOT. The 959 was similarly hot. They did a good job of dispersing the heat on the V2. Way hotter than the SS, but not so bad, really. I didn't really notice it, and it's a hot-ass day here in the Hudson Valley.

Off the stand, you've got to get some headway going before the bike balances. The SS was so forgiving in parking lots, but not so with the V2. It's a tiny trade-off for the nimble handling of the V2, but I need to keep this in mind, because I'm so adapted to the SS. Give the old noggin about a week to get that to second-nature.

Being out for about 2-hours, the only thing that hurt was my neck a little bit. That'll go away as I get accustomed to cocking my head back that much. I used to race road bicycles, so I know that pain goes away with more time in that position, and I'm not concerned about it. My wrists were fine, and my throttle hand never fell asleep like it always did on the SS (not sure why, but it did). I love the V2's seat. It's firm and racy, but doesn't hurt at all.

More here as I learn!

A.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,966 Posts
“My impression of the engine is that it's like having two totally different engines, depending on where you ride in the revs. From like 4k to 8k, it's much like the SS engine. If, instead you keep the lower RPMs around 6-7k and go up from there, it's got acceleration that truly surpasses the SS. Enjoying the lower torquey range makes the V2 really ridable in traffic, or on the highway for mileage, etc. And when I want to scream "hell yes!" I just ride in the higher rev range. Exiting a corner around 6k makes for a smooth exit and then a blast of power as the bike stands back up. So fun!”

Had very similar impressions when I rode one! V2 a little weaker in lower ranges, but not much was sacrificed for a lot more up top.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Had very similar impressions when I rode one! V2 a little weaker in lower ranges, but not much was sacrificed for a lot more up top.
Ed, exactly. And because it's a little less powerful down low, you can get the impression that it's not much more than the SS engine. I thought exactly that until I got onto the highway and opened it up. Panigale, si! When you get up into the Hp peaks, wow, that's a whole other trip. I was finding a sweet spot today by using the peak torque ~6k to begin my corner exits and then letting the top end just launch me out of the corner.

The fact that I was even able to get into that kind of nuance on day 2 of ownership tells you something about how easy the V2 is to ride if you're coming from the SS. It's like you already speak the V2's language and just have to adjust for a different conversation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
You know how you have that day when you finally click with a bike? Well, I had my first day like that on the V2 yesterday, and it was incredibly fun. I went out with a friend who is older (71, and admits that his reaction times are slower) and he was on his BMW 310, which is Vespa-slow. So we just rode really gently through the twisties as I broke in the V2.

What I didn't realize is how little one needs to fight the V2 compared to the SSS in the corners. I would just loll through corners on the V2, and when I looked down at my exit speeds, I was easily 10mph faster than I would have been on the SSS, and I wasn't doing very much at all to corner that fast. I literally thought I was going much more slowly, but in fact I was faster with almost no effort, worry, etc.... And my chicken strips are pretty damn small (not that I care that much, but it tells you something, I suppose).

I guess that's a "real sports bike" for you, but then again, no. The power is manageable, the suspension is sublime, the position is relatively chill, and I find controlling this bike effortless, even in Race mode (which is fast).

What I realize now is that the biggest difference between the two bikes is the handling precision and ease. The shorter wheel base and the aluminum frame make for a very very very different ride, and the SSS (even when dialed in with Dave Moss) feels sloppy and imprecise compared to the V2 (with stock suspension setup).

Dave Moss has emailed me the settings for the V2, so I'll do that today and report back.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Dave Moss ruined the handling of my old bike. Controversial I know, but his settings where hard as nails, and didn’t suit fast road riding, only a smooth track....at best. It was all over the place.

wouldn’t use his settings again, personally.

as for the SSS being sloppy in the handling department, it’s probably one of the best handling bikes I’ve ever ridden.... again, controversial I know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
522 Posts
Think of your SS with its power band still starting around 6k, but now it goes up to 11k (redline is at 12k), and all of that is usable with no deletions of Hp to meet emissions standards, etc.... It just keeps getting faster at going faster as it goes faster....you know what I mean: the SS is a bit linear, and the V2 is more of a ski jump - but, and this is important to me, the V2 never lurches from acceleration (the V4 does that readily).

I'm 50 and need to loose 20 (ok 30) lbs, and yet the V2 is really ridable for me. I wont say comfortable, but for the position it puts you in it's incredibly comfortable! It asks much more of you than the SS does, that's for sure. But, to be honest, what I lose to my wrists I gain in my (somewhat wonky) back. And it's a really fun position to be in. I think that racing position is fun in and of itself, but on the V2 it's even more fun because it's comfy. I also feel that it's the right position for the bike, whereas on some sport bikes the position seems gratuitously aggressive.
As usual it depends on where you ride and what you like. when I lived in North Carolina with easy access to good pavement and twisties, I bought an MV F3 and loved it. When I moved back to Michigan the MV riding position and stiff suspension was all wrong for the roads up here, so I bought the SS. If you can ride twisties or do a lot of track days, the Panis are great fun. On "normal" roads, not so much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Sorry to hear about your bad experience with Dave. I've found he's happy to help me tweak the settings, so don't worry too much if the starting point isn't exactly right for me. My SSS got way better right away, so I had a great first experience.

as for the SSS being sloppy in the handling department, it’s probably one of the best handling bikes I’ve ever ridden.... again, controversial I know.

"Sloppy" maybe isn't the right word, but in relative terms the SSS feels way more relaxed than the Panigale V2, and when pushing corners hard, relaxed can produce the opposite of relaxation. It's funny, but on the Panigale - again, for spirited twisty riding - I feel so relaxed, and so does the bike beneath me. Maybe the word I want is "composure." The Pani maintains composure in a way that the SSS just doesn't in a corner.

With that said, given what the SSS's stated goals are, it is an amazingly great handling bike!

A.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,994 Posts
For canyon riding like in the Ozarks, I am pretty happy with the SS. Yes, it's the best bike I've ever ridden. The taller bars are just about perfect for leverage, the balance, turn-in, smooth ride and braking are superb. And I am not one to ride faster than I can see to stop, so no blind curves and hills too fast. I can guess that a full on sport ride would be better on the track and for grinding knee pads but on the street the SS is pretty nice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
LowRyter, I couldn't agree more! And believe me: I will not be on that Panigale for nearly as long at a stretch. The SSS is so versatile and fun and comfortable - it scratches many itches, while the Panigale just scratches one very specific itch. But, wow, does it scratch it! ;-)

A.
 
1 - 20 of 45 Posts
Top