Ducati Supersport 939 Forum banner

41 - 55 of 55 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
I had the chance to test ride a V2 while waiting for my annual service on the SS to be done.
I didn’t rode for long though, the performances were great, I just was disappointed from the new dash, on a 18K€ bike I wish I had seen the same display of the bigger sisters and not its Tamagotchi version :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Discussion Starter #42
I'd say that for the longest time, Ducati stood for cutting edge power and technology built around a few very unique technologies. Ducati's always stood out as a bit radical, certainly quite beautiful, and very European in a sea of Japanese sport bikes. Given what's available from so many brands today, the SuperSport fails to stand out really, but the V4 Streetfighter (as one example) definitely stands out as a very forward-thinking bike that's truly what Ducati has built their reputation on (all while selling far more less powerful bikes via Scramblers and Monsters). But what about the SS feels truly special and amazing among all the bikes available today? I'd say not that much. Yes, it has all the little Ducati quirks and technologies, but not the bleeding edge of those technologies, and power is tame, handling great but not truly sport-handling (nice for touring, sure), and so on.

And I think anyone walking into a Ducati dealership will look at the SS and think: "Oh, so that's not really the "real Ducati." Not that that's an accurate assessment, but when I stand among the full lineup in a dealership, I do find myself thinking, "So, that's kind of their beginner's bike." or "Ah, kind of like an older Ducati, with most of its components aged out of the cutting edge bikes."

I hate to say this, but in so many ways the SS is trying to do what BMW has always done so well: offer a sensible hi-tech bike for grownups. But I've never that was Ducati's Jam, and I'm not sure they're all that great at it (I'd take a GS1250 over a Multistrada any day for various reasons). And, reversing my thinking, I feel the same thing about BMW's S1000 - nope, not what you guys are great at, and so not quite as appealing as a Ducati.

The more I think about all this, the more I'm thinking the real upgrades to the SS will be to include the full 6-axis electronics package of the Multis and Panigales, the TFT display, probably some more connectivity (perhaps a good integrated nav system), cheaper and better luggage (go for some truly hard cases, Ducati!), and I'd even argue that the foot pegs and seat should be lower and the bars higher, just to make the touring aspects of the SS more legit. Then add cruise control, and I'd be thinking hard about this new bike.

I say all this because I've gone from a SS to a Panigale V2 and a yet-to-be-decided 2nd bike for travel/adventure because I didn't feel the SS was all that great at sport or touring. But perhaps with some true sporting electronic upgrades and a position that's a little better for 8-hour hauls, then the SS could be truly unique in the Ducati lineup.

Some may argue that I'm describing the Multistrada 950, but that bike is TALL and ergonomically and visually a wholly different trip from what I'm imagining for an upgraded SS. I rode the 950 in Tuscany for a week, and my thinking after that was, "This bike is too tall, not that fun to corner on (because I feel like I'm sitting at a desk), nerve-wracking in parking lots, and not particularly sexy to look at."

So, my thinking on the SS has certainly shifted a lot since I bought mine last December and couldn't imagine a better bike. 6500 miles later, I was convinced the SS wasn't right for me. Alas....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,056 Posts
I'd say that for the longest time, Ducati stood for cutting edge power and technology built around a few very unique technologies. Ducati's always stood out as a bit radical, certainly quite beautiful, and very European in a sea of Japanese sport bikes. Given what's available from so many brands today, the SuperSport fails to stand out really, but the V4 Streetfighter (as one example) definitely stands out as a very forward-thinking bike that's truly what Ducati has built their reputation on (all while selling far more less powerful bikes via Scramblers and Monsters). But what about the SS feels truly special and amazing among all the bikes available today? I'd say not that much. Yes, it has all the little Ducati quirks and technologies, but not the bleeding edge of those technologies, and power is tame, handling great but not truly sport-handling (nice for touring, sure), and so on.

And I think anyone walking into a Ducati dealership will look at the SS and think: "Oh, so that's not really the "real Ducati." Not that that's an accurate assessment, but when I stand among the full lineup in a dealership, I do find myself thinking, "So, that's kind of their beginner's bike." or "Ah, kind of like an older Ducati, with most of its components aged out of the cutting edge bikes."

I hate to say this, but in so many ways the SS is trying to do what BMW has always done so well: offer a sensible hi-tech bike for grownups. But I've never that was Ducati's Jam, and I'm not sure they're all that great at it (I'd take a GS1250 over a Multistrada any day for various reasons). And, reversing my thinking, I feel the same thing about BMW's S1000 - nope, not what you guys are great at, and so not quite as appealing as a Ducati.

The more I think about all this, the more I'm thinking the real upgrades to the SS will be to include the full 6-axis electronics package of the Multis and Panigales, the TFT display, probably some more connectivity (perhaps a good integrated nav system), cheaper and better luggage (go for some truly hard cases, Ducati!), and I'd even argue that the foot pegs and seat should be lower and the bars higher, just to make the touring aspects of the SS more legit. Then add cruise control, and I'd be thinking hard about this new bike.

I say all this because I've gone from a SS to a Panigale V2 and a yet-to-be-decided 2nd bike for travel/adventure because I didn't feel the SS was all that great at sport or touring. But perhaps with some true sporting electronic upgrades and a position that's a little better for 8-hour hauls, then the SS could be truly unique in the Ducati lineup.

Some may argue that I'm describing the Multistrada 950, but that bike is TALL and ergonomically and visually a wholly different trip from what I'm imagining for an upgraded SS. I rode the 950 in Tuscany for a week, and my thinking after that was, "This bike is too tall, not that fun to corner on (because I feel like I'm sitting at a desk), nerve-wracking in parking lots, and not particularly sexy to look at."

So, my thinking on the SS has certainly shifted a lot since I bought mine last December and couldn't imagine a better bike. 6500 miles later, I was convinced the SS wasn't right for me. Alas....
It's all about what YOU need the bike to do for YOU, not someone else. The SS didn't work for YOU for the reasons you listed above; I can say for what I do and how I ride the V2 wouldn't be a better bike for me. Doesn't make it good, bad, outdated, crappy, whatever, just not right. If there is a bike that can do better for me what the SS does, i would buy it; right now there isn't.

Interestingly enough you sold your SS and replaced it with a V2 and a yet-to-be-named second bike and I think that is where the SS shines: it's touring enough to go all day long, and sporty enough to put a smile on my face, and I don't need two bikes to replicate that.

It was not sold as a touring bike. It was not sold as a canyon carver. It was sold as a bit of both.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,251 Posts
Said before: they are both great bikes, but each is designed for different purposes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
I also planned to take a closer look at the V2. After a test drive of 50 miles, I gave up on the project. The bike is just too deep for me, or I'm probably too old for it. It's just a super athlete. The SS is much more relaxed with the same joy on the country road. The Streetfighter would be much more relaxed from sitting, but she has a murderous punsh. The thing is really too violent.

I've always said it ... for me the Supersport is the best bike and combines sportiness with comfort. I don't need more on the country road
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Thanks for this post. It's information I really needed. I've been a Harley rider since the mid '90s, rode motors for a Sheriff's office as well (again they were Harleys). My first bike in '89 was a CBR600F, that was my only sport bike. I've always wanted a Ducati but always thought they were out of reach. I currently ride a '20 CVO Limited and have been looking at the Panigale V2 for a few weeks now.

I went to a "local" (over an hour away) dealer a few days ago to get a feel for the V2. Initially it felt very aggressive in the saddle. Sat on a SS and it seemed more comfortable. Sales guy said comparing price points on the SSS and the V2 the V2 offers more technology than the SSS. I know I will get used to the seating and forward lean on the V2 over time.

Going back this week to ride it. It's a gorgeous machine. I recently moved to Eastern TN and love the twisting mountain roads. I'm minutes from the foot of the Cherohola Skyway and that to the Tail of the Dragon and then Foothills Pkwy makes for a great loop. I'll keep the Harley for touring and when friends (all Harley riders) come to visit.

One issue though, I live up a mountain and it's a rocky/dirt road up to my place. How do you think the ride up and down such a road would be on the V2? I was just getting used to riding the CVO up and down when, while out on the Harley they dumped new rocks to resurface the road. Once it gets packed down it should be fine though.

Looking forward to learning more on this forum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,229 Posts
The V2 will be more a handful on dirt & rocks with the low bars and high pegs. Only you know what your road is like. I might note that the V2 is much more expensive than the SS ($16.5k vs $12.2k), has a more frequent maintenance interval, full sport rubber, and no option for saddle bags. Additionally, there are many nice used SS for under $10k.

The SS has a torquey engine that is pretty sporty whereas the V2 has a strong engine that will launch you to the moon. They're really not comparable bikes, one is street oriented and the other for the track.

I'd say that most folks would never use most of the V2 engine, however, there might an exception for the Cherohala, particularly if you have a badge. :cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
The V2 will be more a handful on dirt & rocks with the low bars and high pegs. Only you know what your road is like. I might note that the V2 is much more expensive than the SS ($16.5k vs $12.2k), has a more frequent maintenance interval, full sport rubber, and no option for saddle bags. Additionally, there are many nice used SS for under $10k.

The SS has a torquey engine that is pretty sporty whereas the V2 has a strong engine that will launch you to the moon. They're really not comparable bikes, one is street oriented and the other for the track.

I'd say that most folks would never use most of the V2 engine, however, there might an exception for the Cherohala, particularly if you have a badge. :cool:

Thanks for the input. I may have access to a garage at the foot of the mountain but I was thinking if I can get a 900# touring bike up here I should be able to get the 400# V2 up here as well. As far as bags...don't need them, I have the Harley for long rides/trips. If I did the SS it would be the S. Closer in price to the V2.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,229 Posts
Thanks for the input. I may have access to a garage at the foot of the mountain but I was thinking if I can get a 900# touring bike up here I should be able to get the 400# V2 up here as well. As far as bags...don't need them, I have the Harley for long rides/trips. If I did the SS it would be the S. Closer in price to the V2.
Why would you get the S only because it costs closer to the V2?

I bought my SS used and the previous owner traded in a Harley for it. Then he traded the SS that I purchased for a Panigale. I was surprised hearing that because the SS was barely broken in and still had the original sprocket on it. But I got a good deal with the bags just as I wanted. Actually all 4 of my bikes have bags since I like to take weekend trips to Ozarks. Since you're already in the twisties, the good roads are right at your front door.

For sure the V2 looks like your best option.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Why would you get the S only because it costs closer to the V2?

I bought my SS used and the previous owner traded in a Harley for it. Then he traded the SS that I purchased for a Panigale. I was surprised hearing that because the SS was barely broken in and still had the original sprocket on it. But I got a good deal with the bags just as I wanted. Actually all 4 of my bikes have bags since I like to take weekend trips to Ozarks. Since you're already in the twisties, the good roads are right at your front door.

For sure the V2 looks like your best option.

If I were to get a Supersport it would be the S which is comparable in price to the V2 and the V2 is much more bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,056 Posts
Thanks for this post. It's information I really needed. I've been a Harley rider since the mid '90s, rode motors for a Sheriff's office as well (again they were Harleys). My first bike in '89 was a CBR600F, that was my only sport bike. I've always wanted a Ducati but always thought they were out of reach. I currently ride a '20 CVO Limited and have been looking at the Panigale V2 for a few weeks now.

I went to a "local" (over an hour away) dealer a few days ago to get a feel for the V2. Initially it felt very aggressive in the saddle. Sat on a SS and it seemed more comfortable. Sales guy said comparing price points on the SSS and the V2 the V2 offers more technology than the SSS. I know I will get used to the seating and forward lean on the V2 over time.

Going back this week to ride it. It's a gorgeous machine. I recently moved to Eastern TN and love the twisting mountain roads. I'm minutes from the foot of the Cherohola Skyway and that to the Tail of the Dragon and then Foothills Pkwy makes for a great loop. I'll keep the Harley for touring and when friends (all Harley riders) come to visit.

One issue though, I live up a mountain and it's a rocky/dirt road up to my place. How do you think the ride up and down such a road would be on the V2? I was just getting used to riding the CVO up and down when, while out on the Harley they dumped new rocks to resurface the road. Once it gets packed down it should be fine though.

Looking forward to learning more on this forum.
I rented a cabin with a group of guys last year near Sylva, NC that had a gravel drive just over a mile long with a 14 degree slope right at the beginning/end of it. The SSS went up it just fine with a little momentum, and the switchbacks and 8 degree climb the rest of the way was fine. I have quite a bit of dirtbike experience, however no one in our group of misfits (600RR, F4i, ST1300, BMW 1200RT) was unable to make it.

The gearing on the V2 may be your biggest hurdle since it was the one thing I “struggled” with going up the drive, getting the momentum up.

If you’re selecting between the V2 and the SSS don’t look at it tech for tech as that’s not a good comparison since I can pay $12k for a Tracer GT and get even MORE wizardry for less than both bikes. It’s what works for YOU and your purpose, not what techno gadgets sound good. If you’re dead set on a Ducati sportbike you to identify how you are going to ride it and for how long.

I just pulled in to my house in Minnesota a few hours ago from a 2 day trip down to your area over the weekend where we stayed in Maggie Valley Thursday through Saturday and rode around until the rains hit. I just put Pilot Power 5s on my spring-for-my-weight SSS and scrubbed them in on the BRP and Moonshiner 28 then hit the Gap and the Foothills Parkway before heading back on the longest 265 mile day. I could not have had a better companion for what I did on this trip and it renews my love for the Supersport yet again. If you planned on 120 mile or so days, the V2 would be a great choice; for a longer ride, the SSS is about the perfect sportbike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Nope, these improvements add torque more than top end. At least that is my experience with Termignoni and Upmap. So if anything, the bike becomes stronger where it already is strong.
Anyone feeling a significant increase in top end power with a de-catted and re-mapped SS?
Mine had a full Akro and Up Map.

The biggest difference to me was the throttle response. It was markedly better with the open Akro than not.

The SS has huge torque lower in the RPM- it's a short shifters dream, IMO it's top end power is poor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,229 Posts
Kat, I agree. The power flattens out a little soon. Takes a bit of fun away. But I only miss it when I hit it in a straight-line. Otherwise, it's a good combination when you're cruising in the hills and mountains or just want to pass on a 2 lane road.

I remember when bikes were slower but scary. Now they're faster but not so scary.
 
41 - 55 of 55 Posts
Top