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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone,

I'm committing the act of doing my own servicing on the Supersport. Recently noticed that my oil filter weeps on startup but reseals itself once the engine is warm. Judging by the dirt buildup and the lack of substantial oil level change, the weeping has been going on for some time but only in tiny quantities.

My question to you all is, how tight should I install in the next oil filter? For the filter to weep and reseal like this after the engine warms up, tells me I put this one on too tight and the gasket is no longer flexible. Thoughts?
 

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I usually have no problem with light wrenched "hand tight", never too tight. If it's leaking, I'd suspect that it's the seal, not the tightness. Make sure the rubber seal from the old filter isn't still stuck there. Make sure both surfaces are clean. Examine the seal on the leaky filter.

I usually keep my filters as loose as possible provided they don't leak. If I had too much grief trying to remove old oil filters that I'd rather never go too tight. At least the SS is one of the easiest bikes to service.
 

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@BNMCoffee Unlikely too tight causing leak, imo. You’re probably already doing this, but make sure there is a thin layer of oil on the rubber filter seal and ensure the mating surface on the motor is clean. I guess we all have our personal preferences, but I give it a good twist beyond hand tight with a wrench being careful not to over tighten, but I don’t use a torque wrench for that.

Separately, I see some scuff marks in your pic that look a bit odd. Not sure why a wrench should be touching that area.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
@BNMCoffee Unlikely too tight causing leak, imo. You’re probably already doing this, but make sure there is a thin layer of oil on the rubber filter seal and ensure the mating surface on the motor is clean. I guess we all have our personal preferences, but I give it a good twist beyond hand tight with a wrench being careful not to over tighten, but I don’t use a torque wrench for that.
What does that mean? It's steel-on-steel threads... but the threads on the stud from the engine go into aluminum... somewhere. My main trick is to look at the gasket compression as I'm tightening it. However, seeing as this was my first oil filter change on a motorcycle, I might have gone for too compressed for sure. o_O

I just didn't want someone coming in and saying "Yeah... you put it on too loose. Twist it harder!"
 

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What does that mean? It's steel-on-steel threads... but the threads on the stud from the engine go into aluminum... somewhere. My main trick is to look at the gasket compression as I'm tightening it. However, seeing as this was my first oil filter change on a motorcycle, I might have gone for too compressed for sure. o_O

I just didn't want someone coming in and saying "Yeah... you put it on too loose. Twist it harder!"
The seal is not through the threads but a rubber gasket (attached to the filter) that seals against the bottom of the mating surface. You should apply a film of engine oil before screwing in the filter. I also prefill the filter with engine oil, ab easy process because the filter hangs down.

Hand tighten the filter and then give it 1/4 or 1/2 a turn so it feels firm. Wipe away any excess oil and monitor. If it leaks firm it up some more.
 

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Hand tight and then use an oil filter wrench to turn an additional 3/4 turn. Make sure you use some clean oil to coat gasket before installation and you should be fine for leaks. If you are not familiar using a torque wrench, you can end up applying it with the wrench cocked, screwing up the reading.
 
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