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We have a Prague here in Okla. (pronounced PRAGE) ;)


In all seriousness, Grossi. Absolutely wonderful. I'd love to go there. What a great ride!
 

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First leaves are coming down from trees. Well, yea, be aware. When parking back in a garage I noticed quite intensive smell, but other cars are fine, then it must be me 👀 I smelled all until I found that those lovely leaves making a great scenery flew into my exhaust cover 😏 I couldn't take them out, it was too hot heh... another reason to install Akrapovic. They got there somehow! You can see one brown.
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Also for my known road of curves I found a couple on Ducati Scrambler in nice dark green color with saddle bags. I thought, ok, it will be a nice ride together. But boy oh boy hahaha... I could stick to them until first half of the turn! I thought I am already good rider... 29458 km done! But still I was scared to keep up to them and lean the bike like they did! Not fair 😂 They literally vanished from my sight. I never drove there that fast. You know, one mistake and you are in the woods eh...
 

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In the States we have a course from Motorcycle Safety Foundation (MSF). It's a private foundation, trainers are paid by students for the class which includes classroom and riding instruction. In many states, passing the (intro) class will get the student a motorcycle endorsement on the license. In my case, it was mandated by my employer (advanced class). I thought it was pretty good, the slalom training was particularly effective.

So I'll cut to the chase about trail braking. MSF teaches to brake in a straight line and accelerate going into the corners. This was always a trouble spot for me since I liked to gear down and engine brake into the apex. Trying the MSF approach caused me to ride accelerate to fast and run wide. Now I generally trail brake or occasionally engine brake.

I wonder how this compares to the "Bikesafe" training?
Great question. Alex, the officer I rode with, helped me to use my front brake less, use engine braking more and trail brake. I was so much smoother and faster.
I don’t think there is a bikesafe policy on trail braking but the training is based on your level, bike and the officer themselves. Before the day I almost never used my rear brake, now my front brake is mainly for straight line and last few metres stopping.
 

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…helped me to use my front brake less, use engine braking more and trail brake.….Before the day I almost never used my rear brake, now my front brake is mainly for straight line and last few metres stopping.
Interesting.

I favor the front brake all the time because of the excellent stopping power and use the rear brake to complement the front.

Good onya for learning trail braking. We all do it naturally in our cars (although we don’t call it trail braking) but seem to get confused about what it means and how to do it when we get on two wheels.
 

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Great question. Alex, the officer I rode with, helped me to use my front brake less, use engine braking more and trail brake. I was so much smoother and faster.
I don’t think there is a bikesafe policy on trail braking but the training is based on your level, bike and the officer themselves. Before the day I almost never used my rear brake, now my front brake is mainly for straight line and last few metres stopping.
I think you may be confusing terms.
"Trail braking" doesn't mean using the rear brake. That's called "using the rear brake". :)

Trail braking is using the brakes, mostly or entirely the front brake, as you're leaned over and approaching the apex of the corners. The idea is to maximize the use of your available traction. As you lean more you lessen brake pressure, until as you near max lean you're off the brakes completely.
 

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Rich has got it right but I am believer in using lower gearing as well. Once one gets a "feel" of the bike, he can determine front and back brake. And then you can cover the front brake and sometimes brake and throttle at the same time as you cross the apex.

.......and I'd suggest it's more like dragging the front brake for control to the apex (steepest part of the curve) until you're gassing it. I'm no racer, I just like the "feel" of riding and controlling the bike.

The SS gives a lot of feedback and is pretty forgiving machine.
 

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I think you may be confusing terms.
"Trail braking" doesn't mean using the rear brake. That's called "using the rear brake". :)

Trail braking is using the brakes, mostly or entirely the front brake, as you're leaned over and approaching the apex of the corners. The idea is to maximize the use of your available traction. As you lean more you lessen brake pressure, until as you near max lean you're off the brakes completely.
This.

Like Ben Spies just shared at COTA, on the brakes past tip in and until the knee touches the ground. That’s definitely race track application but that’s where the best use of controls is developed and those techniques can (should!) inform our street riding.

I think it’s also important to remember that we have to load the front tire before we work the tire. Going into corners with an unloaded front end forfeits your optimal contact patch. If you realize you have too much speed for the corner and “grab” some front brake, chances are high you’ll tuck the front end because you’re being abrupt on the controls. In contrast, like @RD52 indicated above, having some lingering contact between the brake pad and rotor as you enter the corner maintains an optimal contact patch and allows you to apply very gentle pressure with positive results if necessary or release the brakes if you’re happy with your speed and direction.

I‘m a product of the Yamaha Champions Riding School so please understand I’m not sharing opinions from my Mom’s basement room but rather sharing distilled race and track proven principles and techniques from the best riders in the world.

Enjoy the journey!
 

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NC- Rich has been to riding school? I didn't know he'd been to any school. Did he pass?
 

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NC- Rich has been to riding school? I didn't know he'd been to any school. Did he pass?
LOL, when I started racing there was nothing, no track days and certainly no instruction. When you got your license you took a "course" that basically went over gridding procedures and what the flags meant. The next day, as your first time ever on a track, you went racing. School?? We didn't need no stinking school!! :)
 
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Like couple years ago at similar autumn time when my mom invited her friend in my young age (nurse) home I wonderfully came up quickly with idea it's great to go on a longer bicycle trip away from home :D this time I've found great roads with many curves. Too bad it's getting dark and cold fast. After 3 years I used my action camera and I must adjust it... shows the view in slow motion almost (stabilization?) so I give only clips. If you have a chance - go ride!
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I'm also practicing not to be afraid of left turns and I try to maintain left mirror on the dividing line, not to go too closer to the middle of a road. I'm stupid and it's so difficult for me... 🤦‍♂️
 

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I got caught in a sunset the other day and boy was I cold by the time I got home. The ride up until the sunset was awesome, perfect weather. My butt was warm though :)
There is a poem that I always like to think about while riding and getting stuck in traffic:

"Whether the weather be fine, or whether the weather be not,
Whether the weather be cold, or whether the weather be hot,
Whatever the weather, a burning header is in the crotch,
Whether we like it or not."
 

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I made another 200 km on twisty roads, here is only fragment of that,
around 44 second all the time you can hear damn mirrors shaking 🤦‍♂️ I don't have time to work on them.
2 min in total (I will remove later, no need to hold bad driving examples heh).
It was 12*C and my hands stiff and cold but ok, slippery actually - it was easy to wake up TC so I did slower not to risk season's end, I know I'm bad, anyway my goal was only to maintain the line and left turns on my half of the road.
Now time for warm bed, ebook and even more warm ⛄ Any good heatead gloves?
 

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Well… not ‘today’, but ‘this weekend…

#1. No comment necessary because I’ve already swamped the forum with this bl**dy pig of a job…
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#2. Once that nightmare concluded, I installed the RapidBike Easy. You‘d swear that Ducati made a special space to put the RBE unit…
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#3 then on to some easy upgrades. Ventura Evo rack.
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#4. And finally, EvoTech ‘shorty’ levers!
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After all that work, I didn’t even get to take if for a test run.

PS, I knew the CAT was big and heavy, but I had no idea it was THIS big and heavy.
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