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2018 Supersport S and 2020 Monster 1200 S
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Well… not ‘today’, but ‘this weekend…

#1. No comment necessary because I’ve already swamped the forum with this bl**dy pig of a job…
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#2. Once that nightmare concluded, I installed the RapidBike Easy. You‘d swear that Ducati made a special space to put the RBE unit… View attachment 44197

#3 then on to some easy upgrades. Ventura Evo rack.
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#4. And finally, EvoTech ‘shorty’ levers!
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After all that work, I didn’t even get to take if for a test run.

PS, I knew the CAT was big and heavy, but I had no idea it was THIS big and heavy.
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Good work Muzz, you've got a new garden ornament:ROFLMAO:
 

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2018 sss
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I think you may be confusing terms.
"Trail braking" doesn't mean using the rear brake. That's called "using the rear brake". :)

Trail braking is using the brakes, mostly or entirely the front brake, as you're leaned over and approaching the apex of the corners. The idea is to maximize the use of your available traction. As you lean more you lessen brake pressure, until as you near max lean you're off the brakes completely.
Agreed. I was braking till the apex, not just using the brakes to slow down to get to cornering speed before the corner. I was however using the rear brake to do this. I don’t just use the rear brake all the time, but it was in interesting learning experience. The bike was more settled in the corners and allowed for speed adjustment with better control.
I do think I need to move my rear brake pedal lower though as my ankles aren’t too flexible.
 

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Agreed. I was braking till the apex, not just using the brakes to slow down to get to cornering speed before the corner. I was however using the rear brake to do this. I don’t just use the rear brake all the time, but it was in interesting learning experience. The bike was more settled in the corners and allowed for speed adjustment with better control.
I do think I need to move my rear brake pedal lower though as my ankles aren’t too flexible.
Using the rear brakes in corners is a bad idea. Front brake should be used for trail braking. It loads the front suspension which gives more traction to the front tire. It shortens the wheel base which allows the bike to turn in easier. As you add lean angle you start to trail off the front brake, hence the name. If you do it wrong and lock up the front, at least it's a low side crash. If you slide the rear in a corner, now you're high siding (a much more violent crash).
 

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2018 Ducati SSS Red
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60 Posts
Went for a short ride on Sunday and on way back hit a pot hole at moderate speed (100-120 kmph). Bike jumped up in the air (1/2 feet) and landed on both wheels. I immediately realized I have lost front with either a ripped tire or broken wheel. Unfortunately, it was latter and rim got seriously bent. Fortunately, suspension and other assembly is fine. Had to take bike to dealership on flatbed. Now, it will take a month to get the replacement rim. Bike out of action till then.

I was also amazed by the stability of the bike, how it landed on both wheels (1.5 in fact) and still I managed to control it very easily. Also, technique of hugging the bike from legs and keep upper body free (i.e. have no pressure on handlebars) probably saved my life (or from major injury at least).

Bent rim :(

Tire Wheel Automotive tire Motor vehicle Tread


Bike loading on a flatbed:

Tire Sky Vehicle Plant Wheel
 

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@abhimanyu Damn - I feel for you :( At least the bike stayed upright and you are ok.

Not sure what it's like in India, but in the UK we can take out a claim against the local authority who is responsible for maintaining the roads if our vehicles are damaged by pot holes; there is certain criteria that has to met though.
 

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@abhimanyu Damn - I feel for you :( At least the bike stayed upright and you are ok.

Not sure what it's like in India, but in the UK we can take out a claim against the local authority who is responsible for maintaining the roads if our vehicles are damaged by pot holes; there is certain criteria that has to met though.
I think there is some similar rule here. I will check that as well!!
 

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I think there is some similar rule here. I will check that as well!!
Make some enquiries @abhimanyu. Why be out of pocket and have to pay for damage caused to your bike by someone else's neglect?

Did you get photos of the pothole? If you haven't, then get some and also try and get a photo showing the depth and width of it. If you don't use a tape measure then use something that people can compare the size to like a pack of cigarettes or a coin.

In the UK, if it has been like that for a while and the local authority knew about it but didn't deal with it, then people have a good chance of of claiming for the damage caused to their vehicle.

God, I sound like a serial claims hunter 😦 But if someone is at fault why should you have to pay for getting your bike fixed?
 
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Thanks @Triplesapper I will get the pics. Place is only 60 kms from my place, I will see if I can go and get a solid pics. Coin for reference is a great idea!! :)

Since rim damage is covered in my insurance (fortunately, I got the most comprehensive one), so I was not too concerned :) but makes sense, local authority is liable for the bad roads, and to top it, it commands a huge toll tax as well.
 

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Even though rim damage is covered on your insurance, you claiming on your insurance for this damage may affect your next years premium (i.e. it may go up) unless you have your no claims discount protected?
 

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Even though rim damage is covered on your insurance, you claiming on your insurance for this damage may affect your next years premium (i.e. it may go up) unless you have your no claims discount protected?
I enquired for the claims, but claim settlement for bad roads will take forever (if it goes through), as govt is not very clear on the rules. Also, they generally find a way out, like i was speeding. Speed limit was 60 kmph at the place. Even if I am able to scrape through the works, road developer's liability is limited and will not cover the cost of new rim. I might have to file a law suit and that is not worth it, as my bike will be in service center for longer.

Glad you're OK, that could've been nasty.
Thanks! I realized and was indeed very lucky to land with right side up.
 

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I was waiting for info about speed limits... yea... you were too fast and it's easy to cancel your request. You won't get anything fighting - too much hassle when first line would be - 100 on 60... it's bad luck and super more luck you landed properly. Try to make a custom clock from the rim and put it in a garage heh.
 

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I enquired for the claims, but claim settlement for bad roads will take forever (if it goes through), as govt is not very clear on the rules. Also, they generally find a way out, like i was speeding. Speed limit was 60 kmph at the place. Even if I am able to scrape through the works, road developer's liability is limited and will not cover the cost of new rim. I might have to file a law suit and that is not worth it, as my bike will be in service center for longer.
When I smashed the muffler on my bike due to broken pavement, I didn't even get a reply from the highway dept. I even had a Highway Patrol cop talk to me at the the time and went back to mark the pavement.

Luckily, the pipe and muffler were pretty cheap on eBay since so many change those parts out with aftermarket pipes.
 

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We went out on a nudie run today. He was nude, not me. I took off his fairings over the weekend, to inspect as much of the wiring as I could, but couldn't find any issues that might cause the ABS/DTS/Speedo errors which persist. He's going back to the dealer tomorrow.

Tire Wheel Automotive tire Automotive lighting Vehicle


Interesting how much cooler my legs felt with him undressed. That said, I prefer the fairings... "clothes maketh the man" don't they say?
 

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Using the rear brakes in corners is a bad idea. Front brake should be used for trail braking. It loads the front suspension which gives more traction to the front tire. It shortens the wheel base which allows the bike to turn in easier. As you add lean angle you start to trail off the front brake, hence the name. If you do it wrong and lock up the front, at least it's a low side crash. If you slide the rear in a corner, now you're high siding (a much more violent crash).
Don't agree at all. Why you think motogp riders use rear break all the time?
My own experience is that in slow corners in the mountains the rearbreak helps a lot to stabilize the bike.
 

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Why you think motogp riders use rear break all the time?
Hmmm…not sure about that. I see a lot of rear wheel in the air with a right leg dangle in the MotoGP and WSBK braking zone. Unless all those leg danglers have a thumb brake, I think they’re almost exclusively on front brake.

That doesn’t refute your excellent point that a gradual application of rear brake before the corner stabilizes the chassis. I agree with that 100%.

Maybe we can all agree that being abrupt on the controls is one of the seven reasons we crash.
 

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Don't agree at all. Why you think motogp riders use rear break all the time?
My own experience is that in slow corners in the mountains the rearbreak helps a lot to stabilize the bike.
Agree, the rear brake stabilizes the bike when braking and cornering. I use front trail braking most of the time but sometimes a little rear brake helps, especially going steeply downhill when you're weighted too much over the front of the bars. And I sometimes <gasp> just kick it down a gear, back off the gas and let engine slow me down.
 

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Don't agree at all. Why you think motogp riders use rear break all the time?
My own experience is that in slow corners in the mountains the rearbreak helps a lot to stabilize the bike.
Yes, but two things:
They are far, far better riders than you or I.
Most of them use a thumb brake for that.

I know that when I started racing, I tried using the rear brake. Turned out to be a terrible idea, at least for me. There was so little weight on the rear end that the brake was extremely sensitive, and it caused far more issues than it solved. I quickly switched to front brake only, and it took all my concentration to focus on that, both straight up and down and as I trail braked towards the apex.

On the street, I find that engine braking supplies all the rear end braking I need. Only time I touch the rear is during parking lot speed maneuvers.
 
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