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I'm no instructor but here are videos from several reputable instructors who explain trail braking. They explain including the physics behind it, geometry of the motorcycle, etc. They all explain it the same way with the front brake.




If anyone has any sources of instructors advocating trail braking with the rear brake, I'd be interested to hear their opinions on it. Like I said, I'm no racer or instructor, just trying to learn the best techniques and tips.
 

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I'm no instructor but here are videos from several reputable instructors who explain trail braking. They explain including the physics behind it, geometry of the motorcycle, etc. They all explain it the same way with the front brake.




If anyone has any sources of instructors advocating trail braking with the rear brake, I'd be interested to hear their opinions on it. Like I said, I'm no racer or instructor, just trying to learn the best techniques and tips.
I am sure Greg from motojitsu has videos on including the rear brake in cornering as a choice. But like everything he says, he focuses on practicality and practice far more than rules. I personally think that learning how to use all the controls smoothly in almost all situations gives us more options when unexpected crap happens, especially in corners. Does there really have to be just one right answer for all situations?
 

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If anyone has any sources of instructors advocating trail braking with the rear brake, I'd be interested to hear their opinions on it. Like I said, I'm no racer or instructor, just trying to learn the best techniques and tips.
I’m an unashamed devotee of the Yamaha Champions Riding School.

Day One is all about front brake.

Day Two introduces rear brake but the YCRS team focuses on using it first and early in the braking zone to set the chassis but then focusing almost exclusively on the front brake for the majority of braking. They don’t discourage use of the rear brake but favor the front brake since the hands are going to relax at tip in (thus facilitating trail braking while leaned over) whereas the feet are not relaxed, certainly the inside foot won’t be.
 

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I am sure Greg from motojitsu has videos on including the rear brake in cornering as a choice. But like everything he says, he focuses on practicality and practice far more than rules. I personally think that learning how to use all the controls smoothly in almost all situations gives us more options when unexpected crap happens, especially in corners. Does there really have to be just one right answer for all situations?
I use my rear brake a lot more while street riding than I do on the track. On track, almost no rear brake unless I’m about to blow my line to tip in.
 

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Does there really have to be just one right answer for all situations?
Definitely not. But I do like to understand why something works, not just what others are doing. The way the first video explains trail braking makes sense to me. Ive seen videos of MotoGP riders doing all sorts of unorthodox **** while riding, so of course there is more than one way. With that being said, I've only recently started practicing trail braking. I don't use it for 95% of my riding at the moment. And I use the rear brake with the front brake for almost all of my braking other than trail braking in corners.
 

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I wish there were a better name for trail braking because I think it’s a somewhat confusing term.

We trail brake all the time in our cars. We just have to learn to recognize it and then apply it to riding on two wheels.

One of the most representative moments we trail brake in our cars is when we conduct a pressurized exit from the highway. You know, like when you‘re zipping along the highway, there’s a lot of traffic behind you and you can’t really slow down but you have to take the exit and it turns out to be a tight exit, marked at 25mph or so.

Without freaking out, we apply strong but smooth braking as we exit and then we smoothly ease off the brakes as we make our way around the curve of the exit ramp. We smoothly, not abruptly, trailed off the brakes after we committed to the curve.

From there, the story continues on with a small amount of maintenance throttle in the curve to maintain the speed we’ve set. Then when we see the entrance lane, we’re immediately back on the throttle to accelerate onto the straightaway of the next highway.
 

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Trail braking, rear braking... I follow the bible of 100 points of grip (Yamaha Champ School).


Once that had been ingrained into my mind, it helps with experimentation of how I feel my bikes' tires react to my inputs. MotoGP bikes react differently than SuperMoto. I always love sharing this video showing what I mean:


That person is constantly using their rear brake, along with front brake, to achieve those insanely tight turns. "But how do I learn this power?" Through practice and the layer of skills. In the guide I've been using to get my turn radius down, it tells you to pulse the rear brake post-apex: How to get under 30 sec on GP8 Gymkhana layout

What does this mean? It means it requires different techniques for different corners. Long sweeping corners that supersport bikes like probably don't require much rear brake mid corner. A corner the size of two parking spots will require that rear brake though. However, BOTH techniques require that you understand your 100 points of grip.
 

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Panicked when my Dewalt Impact Wrench/Gun wouldn't undo my rear wheel nut 😱
This is the first time I've removed the rear wheel since I picked up the 950 a few months back. I thought that the Dealer must have exceeded the torque setting when they put the rear wheel nut on after having the wheels sprayed red before I picked the bike up from them. The Gun worked perfectly fine on the rear wheel nut of the 939 :unsure:
Tried with a breaker bar to get the nut off and it wouldn't budge.
Tried again with the gun and then realised that the battery was dying and that was probably the reason why it wasn't up to the job.
Charged the battery and and a hour later the nut came off easy peazy :)
So, SC Projects end cans off, rear wheel off, front sprocket cover, hugger and chain guard too. Gave the chain a good clean and oil, cleaned all the areas hidden by the bits I took off.
Left and right fairing still off from last weekend when I took off the EvoTech Radiator and Oil Guards to give things a good clean unfer the fairings.
Will re-assemble tomorrow.
 

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I know this is kind of turning into a trail braking discussion but I use it all the time and I am a pretty new rider. I can't see how I would be able to ride without it. Trail braking saved me once from a disabled SUV sitting right around a blind corner. Also helped me keep one more duck in this world around a blind left hander. I use front brake first and then I add rear brake once I feel like I need more stopping power in a straight line. Once I'm comfortable with my entry speed, I release rear brake and "trail" off the front as I tip in. Sometimes I can just use the front brake to accomplish the tip in if I'm not giving it the beans and traveling at a more leisurely pace. Of course low speed is all rear brake, learned that lesson the hard way on my Ninja 650.

Anyway, took her out on some wet roads for the first time today. I never really ride in the rain or the wet, so I took it super easy, but it was still a fun ride. I'm doing all my riding in sport mode now (with level 2 ABS), I've become a believer. I was worried about it on the wet roads, but I wanted to challenge myself today and it all turned out alright. No code browns.
 

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BTW, if anybody’s curious, Nick Ienatsch is still wicked fast at 60 and I don’t foresee him slowing down for another decade. In fact, I can see him still dusting up a bunch of youngsters when he’s 75.

I was up in South Carolina with him, Chris and the YCRS crew earlier this month and and he’s so efficient in the braking zone, is so precise on getting direction and getting to WOT so much faster that he walks away on the exits. Two corners later and he just vanishes. I have to hot pit and go back out when the track clears up to recover my ego.

I’ll be with him again in January for four days both working and testing.

I got a late start at this track stuff (and it’s all @se7en fault) but so happy to be learning from Nick, Chris and the YCRS crew.
 

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Regarding trail braking. I never understood the instruction from MSF teaching acceleration entering into a turn. Rider enters a corner, may not have clear visibility of road debris, have not passed the apex and could run wide if misjudged. And even worse deal for blind corners or decreasing radius.

I tried to follow that advice for a while but discovered I was naturally prone to slow down until passing the apex, many times using gearing.

And for Nick, he used to do regular seminars at Cycle World shows. He was very receptive questions and answers, matter of fact, not ego driven.
 

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So the fairings are back on, bike cleaned, up on a rear paddock stand, battery trickle charger connected and a cover over it. That's it now until the spring 2022; March at the earliest 😕

Next job is cleaning and treating my leathers, boots, gloves and helmet and my textile gear
 
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So the fairings are back on, bike cleaned, up on a rear paddock stand, battery trickle charger connected and a cover over it. That's it now until the spring 2022; March at the earliest 😕

Next job is cleaning and treating my leathers, boots, gloves and helmet and my textile gear
Nice work! You inspired me to do something similar on my R1250RT. Took off some of the front and side trim to get a little bit of a deeper clean. Didn't bother with the rest of the plastic as I didn't think it was worth the time. I pulled the battery and hooked it up to a maintainer. Added stabilizer to a full tank of fuel and did an oil + filter change.

I have a rear stand for mine too as well as a center stand. I just left it on the kickstand. I read flat spots in tires was more of a thing with bias ply tires and not so much with radial tires. I felt like lifting the rear up would just put more weight on the front tire, possibly causing more issues than solving? Probably overthinking it, I dunno. I made sure the tires were inflated correctly and might just roll it a little bit every once in awhile. I know some guys put something under the tires so they aren't on the concrete directly too. I've never done that but maybe it's worth doing?

I was supposed to be winterizing two bikes this year. I put a down payment on a 950S with the full Akra system but the dealer screwed up and had the wrong exhaust. They can't get it until mid December so I told them I'd pick it up in spring.

Getting a cover isn't a bad idea either...
 

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So the fairings are back on, bike cleaned, up on a rear paddock stand, battery trickle charger connected and a cover over it. That's it now until the spring 2022; March at the earliest 😕

Next job is cleaning and treating my leathers, boots, gloves and helmet and my textile gear
What's your favorite ways to clean your leathers and textiles, Trip? Or have you already shared in another thread?

(And, my heart goes out to you poor souls that cannot ride your bikes all year round!)
 

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@Boe In answer to your question, I have started a separate thread here

 
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@Audi403 A cover is great for keeping the dust, fly and spider crap off the bike! Have you seen the 'mess' spiders make when they eat and crap 😂

As for flat spots on tyres during storage, there is a thread here about it

 

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It's been months and this finally clears up how to use the menus:
Rectangle Font Circle Number Parallel


I've been stuck in Urban mode. :LOL: .... 😫

EDIT: What DWC setting is best to easily pull some sick power wheelies but not do it as a dank nooner...
 
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