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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Guys I am finding mixed numbers regarding the torque settings on the rear wheel nuts.
160ft Lb - 190ft Lb
190nm - 230nm

Crikey that's a serious tug on a very thin walled nut. I am guessing the gearbox should be in neutral for rear wheel removal. A good hard press on the rear brake beats buggering the gearbox. Is this a two man job because that is some serious torque requirement.

I feel a bit insecure using these aluminium sockets, anybody have a tool supplier with good quality sockets that will not damage the nuts. The chamfer on normal steel sockets will possibly damage the nut too so I think we need to source a decent socket.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·

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I noticed many complaints about the aluminium ones. I went with an industrial chrome vanadium one and pick it up from the machine shop in the morning, having them trim it back because the chamfer was more than 1/3 of the nut depth. Better safe than sorry.
It;s good if you can to get other than a standard socket, the nut is large and open to twisting; the specially designed products locate in the centre bore to provide support and alignment, and a front spindle socket too. But I know loads of people using standard sockets that haven't had any problems.:laugh:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
It;s good if you can to get other than a standard socket, the nut is large and open to twisting; the specially designed products locate in the centre bore to provide support and alignment, and a front spindle socket too. But I know loads of people using standard sockets that haven't had any problems.:laugh:
Since buying the SS I have been working on relationships with the dealers engineers, they have to supply their own tools and the chief eng. said he uses a standard industrial socket, so I went with the same and removed the chamfer for safety sake. Pulled of the circlip today and placed the socket on both sides, it fits nicely. My new concern is 1" to 3/4" plus 3/4" to 1/2" reducers. On the left side, I think will be a two man job, one for holding the rear brake. Right side I think I can get away doing it alone.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Guys I am finding mixed numbers regarding the torque settings on the rear wheel nuts.
160ft Lb - 190ft Lb
190nm - 230nm

Crikey that's a serious tug on a very thin walled nut. I am guessing the gearbox should be in neutral for rear wheel removal. A good hard press on the rear brake beats buggering the gearbox. Is this a two man job because that is some serious torque requirement.

I feel a bit insecure using these aluminium sockets, anybody have a tool supplier with good quality sockets that will not damage the nuts. The chamfer on normal steel sockets will possibly damage the nut too so I think we need to source a decent socket.
So does anyone know the correct torque settings ?????
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for the confirmation, I made incremental settings to my torque wrench 200-240nm today whilst 'tightening' the nut before unloosening it to take off the wheel and it stopped clicking when I adjusted it to 240nm. 230nm from the factory assembly line is bang on.
I didn't know the measurement so I did it the logical way and work backwards to get the torque measurement. Got clicks without even applying force to the bar, then when the clicks stop you know you have it.
 

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I found a nice set of tools on e-bay US. Ducati 1098 Streetfighter Maintenance Tool Set. Chain/Wheel/Headset/Oil/Fork


Spanner for chain adjustment steel, oil filter wrench aluminum, rear wheel - front axle combo steel, top steering nut aluminum handle with steel pins, to the left out of the photo is a front axle holder alum with steel pin, all for $109 shipped. I haven't used anything yet but it all fits my 939S and looks to be nice quality.


You will still need a large Torx (#50? I will check later) to loosen the wheel housing to adjust the chain, but I had one already.


Frank





Maybe I should have one less adult beverage before using my camera. 0:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I found a nice set of tools on e-bay US. Ducati 1098 Streetfighter Maintenance Tool Set. Chain/Wheel/Headset/Oil/Fork


Spanner for chain adjustment steel, oil filter wrench aluminum, rear wheel - front axle combo steel, top steering nut aluminum handle with steel pins, to the left out of the photo is a front axle holder alum with steel pin, all for $109 shipped. I haven't used anything yet but it all fits my 939S and looks to be nice quality.


You will still need a large Torx (#50? I will check later) to loosen the wheel housing to adjust the chain, but I had one already.


Frank





Maybe I should have one less adult beverage before using my camera. 0:)
Frank it's a T60. Preferably a socket to ratchet type. Might be a bit difficult with the T-handle or allen Torx type. Used it recently to loosen the chain for some work I have been doing on the bike.
 

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I stumbled across this thread while trying to find out if the rear wheel nut is a right or left handed thread. It’s a conventional thread by the way, right handed.

In response to the points raised re specialist sockets, I used an industrial standard socket and put two rounds of masking tape around the nut first to limit marking. I filed any rough edges off the socket first too. It worked fine with no damage, I passed mt left arm through the rear wheel and held the socket firmly flush to the wheel while operating the bar with my right arm. This was with my Mrs on the bike holding both brakes on, it was much easier than I expected.

A word of warning though is that a standard sprocket doesn’t have much nut to bite on and so it could easily slip off damaging the nut and potential the rim too if it isn’t held firmly flush to the wheel. I definitely wouldn’t want to try this without some weight on the bike and the brakes being applied.

Incidentally, I would have bought the stainless socket on the link earlier in this thread. The only reason I didn’t is that I already had the 55mm socket that was given to me when my father sold his MV Augusta F4.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I stumbled across this thread while trying to find out if the rear wheel nut is a right or left handed thread. It’s a conventional thread by the way, right handed.

In response to the points raised re specialist sockets, I used an industrial standard socket and put two rounds of masking tape around the nut first to limit marking. I filed any rough edges off the socket first too. It worked fine with no damage, I passed mt left arm through the rear wheel and held the socket firmly flush to the wheel while operating the bar with my right arm. This was with my Mrs on the bike holding both brakes on, it was much easier than I expected.

A word of warning though is that a standard sprocket doesn’t have much nut to bite on and so it could easily slip off damaging the nut and potential the rim too if it isn’t held firmly flush to the wheel. I definitely wouldn’t want to try this without some weight on the bike and the brakes being applied.

Incidentally, I would have bought the stainless socket on the link earlier in this thread. The only reason I didn’t is that I already had the 55mm socket that was given to me when my father sold his MV Augusta F4.
For safety sake I use a 12 point instead of a 6 point chrome alloy socket. (machined and re-chamferred)
 

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For safety sake I use a 12 point instead of a 6 point chrome alloy socket. (machined and re-chamferred)
Yes, the one I have I saw a 12 point but standard other than any internal imperfections having been gently filed away.
 

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I found a nice set of tools on e-bay US. Ducati 1098 Streetfighter Maintenance Tool Set. Chain/Wheel/Headset/Oil/Fork


Spanner for chain adjustment steel, oil filter wrench aluminum, rear wheel - front axle combo steel, top steering nut aluminum handle with steel pins, to the left out of the photo is a front axle holder alum with steel pin, all for $109 shipped. I haven't used anything yet but it all fits my 939S and looks to be nice quality.


You will still need a large Torx (#50? I will check later) to loosen the wheel housing to adjust the chain, but I had one already.


Frank





Maybe I should have one less adult beverage before using my camera. 0:)
I got this kit too, or rather a similar one as it has one more tool and was actually advertised as for our bike. Seems that these listings ends and gets relisted every so often so this link will probably stop being current soonish. A bit annoying but usually eBay provides a link to the relisted item.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Ducati-S...4?pageci=018f0640-78db-4568-8e81-e02ee501c8d1
 
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