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Discussion Starter #1
There have been one or two over the years in both MotoGp with Maria Herrara and WSB with Ana Carrasco who won the 2018 World Supersport 300 Championship.
In 2005, Maria Costello stepped on the Podium in the TT.
There will be more female racers, but sadly none spring to mind at this moment.

So why can't a woman be as successful as a man in Bike racing? Fitness shouldn't have anything to do with it, nor state of mind. All Motorsports are a male dominated sport, but I would love to see more female riders in all classes across all championships; world and domestic championships

The film below is by Suzi Perry as she follows 3 female riders in Road Racing; so much more dangerous than circuit racing

 

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Shana Texter put on a really good run at Volusia Half Mile. She finished 2nd on the factory KTM in the Pro Singles Class.

Flat Track is much more dangerous than circuit racing.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Jenny Tinmouth comes to mind. I follow her on Twitter:

Damn, I forgot about Jenny. I was on a Trackday a few years ago at Oulton Park (her home circuit) and she was using the Trackday as testing for a round of the BSB. I think she still spanners in a bike shop about 10 miles from where I used to live. Shame she is not in BSB any more.
 

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Damn, I forgot about Jenny. I was on a Trackday a few years ago at Oulton Park (her home circuit) and she was using the Trackday as testing for a round of the BSB. I think she still spanners in a bike shop about 10 miles from where I used to live. Shame she is not in BSB any more.
yup, used to do all work on my bikes, Along with Mike from Motrac. Certainly knows her stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
yup, used to do all work on my bikes, Along with Mike from Motrac. Certainly knows her stuff.
Whereabouts do you live Sin? I'm assuming if Jenny worked on your bikes you are on the Wirral somewhere?
 

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Fitness shouldn't have anything to do with it, nor state of mind.
I'm not so sure that I agree with that. Marquez is obviously a once in a lifetime talent, but the guy is extremely shredded and it's obvious that he's using his strength to reign the bike back in when he pushes the tires past their limit. The predicament for Rossi has long been balancing muscle mass with his taller frame. He can't bulk up as much as he'd like to because of the excess weight. Pedrosa's size was an advantage in tire life but though he had all the talent in the world, he was a bit too small to be able to tame the bike as effectively as larger riders when he'd lose his rhythm. I've seen Quartararo's fitness regime and it's...intense, to say the least. I think we see guys like Lorenzo in his prime - or Fabio today - being so smooth that it looks almost effortless to ride they way they are. I think the way Marc muscles his Honda around the track makes it a little more obvious how strong a rider needs to be, but I do think that this is one Motorsport where women actually are at a disadvantage.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I'm not so sure that I agree with that. Marquez is obviously a once in a lifetime talent, but the guy is extremely shredded and it's obvious that he's using his strength to reign the bike back in when he pushes the tires past their limit. The predicament for Rossi has long been balancing muscle mass with his taller frame. He can't bulk up as much as he'd like to because of the excess weight. Pedrosa's size was an advantage in tire life but though he had all the talent in the world, he was a bit too small to be able to tame the bike as effectively as larger riders when he'd lose his rhythm. I've seen Quartararo's fitness regime and it's...intense, to say the least. I think we see guys like Lorenzo in his prime - or Fabio today - being so smooth that it looks almost effortless to ride they way they are. I think the way Marc muscles his Honda around the track makes it a little more obvious how strong a rider needs to be, but I do think that this is one Motorsport where women actually are at a disadvantage.
What I was suggesting is that fitness and/or state of mind should not be showstopper between the genders. I understand what you are saying about the different levels of fitness between riders, but surely the same logic you put across for males will apply to females as well. Look at Ana Carrasco - she won the 2018 World Supersport 300 Championship out of a field of 34 riders only 2 were female - the other being being Maria Herrara. I appreciate that for the smaller capacity bikes (in this case 300cc) being small framed and not 'heavy' in weight is a distinct advantage, but that goes for the male riders too; the likes of Scott Redding or Chas Davies would not have stood a chance due to their height - indeed in Scott Redding's earlier years in MotoGP on the smaller capacity bikes his height was a major disadvantage.
 

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What I was suggesting is that fitness and/or state of mind should not be showstopper between the genders. I understand what you are saying about the different levels of fitness between riders, but surely the same logic you put across for males will apply to females as well. Look at Ana Carrasco - she won the 2018 World Supersport 300 Championship out of a field of 34 riders only 2 were female - the other being being Maria Herrara. I appreciate that for the smaller capacity bikes (in this case 300cc) being small framed and not 'heavy' in weight is a distinct advantage, but that goes for the male riders too; the likes of Scott Redding or Chas Davies would not have stood a chance due to their height - indeed in Scott Redding's earlier years in MotoGP on the smaller capacity bikes his height was a major disadvantage.
I think if we looked at the gender breakdown on minibikes it would be pretty obvious that women are not starting off on a fair foot and there's not as much of a pool of talented women to choose from because they're simply doing something else. The same bothers me as an American. The last MotoGP champion from the U.S. was of course Nicky Hayden (rest in peace, champ) and it's obvious that all the "start them young" efforts go into other types of motorcycle racing such as motocross; with a more shallow pool we'll have less prospects to find an alien at the deep end. If there were more women trying we'd certainly see more women succeeding but I do think that there's a physical barrier to the top end of the sport. Using Dani as an example his physiology would make him stronger than a woman his size, but he really wasn't strong enough to pull together a championship despite having the talent. It'd be interesting to see a top-level female racer in qualifying and see what she could do in a single lap, but I think being at a physical disadvantage over 20 laps might be too difficult to overcome. It's sort of like tennis. It seems like there should be a close balance between the top women and top men, but there's the famous story of the Brit who was ranked, what, in the hundreds beating both Williams sisters in singles while being a tad tipsy from a couple of beers at lunch. In a car I see no reason a woman would be at a disadvantage, but motorcycle racing takes strength and endurance, and lots of it.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
@Ace Bongwater Johnson I agree with you about Dani Pedrosa - talented but always the Bridesmade never the Bride.
Maria Costello finished 3rd and got on the podium in the 2016 Classic TT race (350 to 500cc bikes - Maria was riding a Paton 500); there were 57 other competitors, all male. She also finished 12th in the 2016 Lightweight TT (up to 650cc) again, the lone female in a field of 51 competitors. As we know the TT course requires both strength and stamina to complete.
 

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I think that Shayna is probably the most successful female racer that I can think of. She's on the factory KTM now.

She won the Sac Mile a few years ago. About as pure racing that you'll see in any motor sport, 2 or 4 wheels.

 

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@Ace Bongwater Johnson I agree with you about Dani Pedrosa - talented but always the Bridesmade never the Bride.
Maria Costello finished 3rd and got on the podium in the 2016 Classic TT race (350 to 500cc bikes - Maria was riding a Paton 500); there were 57 other competitors, all male. She also finished 12th in the 2016 Lightweight TT (up to 650cc) again, the lone female in a field of 51 competitors. As we know the TT course requires both strength and stamina to complete.
I really wish Dani had gotten himself a MotoGP championship. Probably the nicest guy in the paddock and it was tough seeing him at the end being battered around by the Honda. I also wish I could see Stoner vs. Marquez, but c'est la vie!

I think I ultimately agree with you though it sounds like I don't. Competing for a MotoGP championship isn't the only worthwhile form of motorcycle racing of course. I think there are few women in motorcycle racing because they're not being pushed into it at a young age. It's obviously something hard to come into late in life and be successful at, so the women are largely starting off on the wrong foot. The same can be said of black riders or Chinese riders, or people from cultures anywhere where road racing bikes isn't so popular. The sad fact is that the most talented rider in the world could be a kid in Kansas sat on top of a tractor plowing fields, or a girl growing up on a council state in Birmingham. Neither of these kids are exposed to the right culture to have their talents discovered and nurtured. Even in Italy and Spain where motorcycle racing is most certainly a part of the culture, girls are still not being stuck on minibikes like boys and being brought up to race. I think that if girls were being encouraged to take up motorcycle racing as much as boy in the places we'd see more at higher levels, but I do genuinely think there would be a physical barrier at the highest levels because of the strength required to horse around a 240 hp bike that weights about the same as the CR50 I had as a tike. My wife enjoys watching MotoGP with me (I think it's all the handsome young Europeans in leather she likes more than the racing!) and she doesn't think it looks especially hard to do what they're doing. At the same time, I watch the wa That's the funny thing about those at the top of their profession. They make something so difficult look so easy!
 

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I am not so sure that Dani was well liked. I do know when the GP moved to Indy that the crowd booed him. Of course, that was expected because his accident with Nicky that nearly cost him the championship. And then Honda threw Nicky over the fence and designed the replacement bike for Dani. Nicky said he could barely fit on the bike and after he ran the season experimenting with new parts as he was winning the title.

So I wasn't surprised that he wasn't a crowd favorite but I noticed that he was a loner around all the other riders when they did the group photo. Even new comer Ben Spies was yacking it up with Nicky, Colin and Vale while Dani was just standing alone.

But I agree given his career that it is a bit sad the he didn't win a title. And I have no idea how popular he was with the other riders other than observing as a spectator. And do so far as Nicky, ultimately it was no hard-no foul.

Agree. A real shame that Stoner quit so early. All kinds of rumors it was for health reasons. No doubt on another level of talent and bike control. The deal at Laguna with Rossi was one for the ages.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
@LowRyter Dani did seem to be a loner and always on the edge of things; including winning a championship. He was a Honda man through and through and succumbed to injuries at the wrong time in his career - not that there is such a thing as a right time for injuries.

Off topic, but ......

Some riders are universally adored by everyone and others aren't. Take Lorenzo for example - booed by Rossi fans at quite a few rounds because he and the Doctor didn't see eye to eye.
Troy Baylis - never heard anyone say a bad word about him.
I'm sure it was Ben Spies (someone please correct me if I have got this totally wrong) who for some reason was disliked when he came to WSB and again correct me if I'm wrong, but unfortunately his mother (his manager?) didn't seem to be liked either and came in for some stick too. Yet Ben went on to take the title.
 

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@LowRyter Dani did seem to be a loner and always on the edge of things; including winning a championship. He was a Honda man through and through and succumbed to injuries at the wrong time in his career - not that there is such a thing as a right time for injuries.

Off topic, but ......

Some riders are universally adored by everyone and others aren't. Take Lorenzo for example - booed by Rossi fans at quite a few rounds because he and the Doctor didn't see eye to eye.
Troy Baylis - never heard anyone say a bad word about him.
I'm sure it was Ben Spies (someone please correct me if I have got this totally wrong) who for some reason was disliked when he came to WSB and again correct me if I'm wrong, but unfortunately his mother (his manager?) didn't seem to be liked either and came in for some stick too. Yet Ben went on to take the title.
I pretty much slagged on Lorenzo when he "won" his last title when Rossi was penalized. It wasn't because Lorenzo took advantage of it but that he public said the Rossi penalty was justified. In my mind it was a huge screw job and I still don't care for #93 for his antics and the fact that Dorna was so biased. Lorenzo ended up leaving Yamaha and all the wheels fell off. I am sure that Ducati and Lorenzo wish they'd never parted. It's a shame he didn't contend for the championship on the Duc and they only straightened out the bike for him after bridges were burned.

Spies was another eccentric, for example he was afraid of flying and very shy around fans. I took his picture once in the Suzuki paddock at Barber, he froze up and turned away, very odd. I have met his mother at their restaurant in Dallas and I can't imagine that her presence would've been an asset. I won't repeat our conversation other than that she was very nice and talks a lot. Ben was my favorite rider at the time. I think he was very talented and might've been champ under the right circumstances. I doubt that anyone WSBK would like him when he and his mechanic would just show up on a new bike and win nearly every race. I thought he was set. Unfortunately despite a promising start in GP, he had bad luck, broken motorcycles (broken seat, broken swing arm) and quickly lost confidence. Then he had serious shoulder injuries and that was it. Sad end for American GP racing.
 

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Actually Shayna has been successful. There's few things bigger in motorcycle racing than winning a Mile. She's done it. Due to her size, she's running in the Singles Class but on the factory KTM. I once saw her get knocked down on a no-pass, one-lane Daytona Short Track. She got right back up from the end of the pack. passed everyone in front of her until she got her original position back in practice. No one but her passed anyone.

I don't know any woman that's done more in motorcycle racing.
 
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